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September, 1910 




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The St. Mary's Muse. 



SUMMER NUMBER. 



Vol. XV. September, 1910. No. 1. 



THE SIXTY-NINTH SESSION, I9I0-191I. 

September 13, Tuesday New pupils report. 

September 14, Wednesday Old pupils report. 

September 15, Thursday Session opens at 9 a. m. 

The preliminary work of the year will begin on Monday, the 12th, 
when local pupils will report in the morning for registration and classi- 
fication ; this registration of local pupils will continue on Tuesday 
morning. 

All new boarding pupils are expected during Tuesday, when they will 
register, be assigned to their places, and informally examined and classi- 
fied. On Wednesday morning the informal written test in English will 
be held; and registration, examination and classification will continue 
through the day. 

On Thursday morning the session will formally open with the Chapel 
Service at 9 o'clock in the morning. After the opening service the 
classes will meet for organization and assignment of work. On Friday 
morning the classes will meet regularly in accordance with the regular 
schedule, and regular work will continue from Friday. 

All new pupils probably already know that the St. Mary's holiday is 
Monday and not Saturday ; and all pupils will be interested in knowing 
that the class work this session will be held from 9 to 1:30 and 2:15 
to 3:15, the morning Chapel service being at 8 :30 instead of at 9, as in 
late years. 



2' The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Faculty and Officers 1910-19011. 

Rev. George W. Lay Eector. 

Miss Eleanor W. Thomas Lady Principal. 

Mr. Ernest Cruikshank Secretary and Business Manager. 

Academic Department. 

Rev. George W. Lay Bible and Ethics. 

Miss Eleanor W. Thomas English. 

Mr. Wm. E. Stone History and German 

Mr. Ernest Cruikshank Science 

Miss Frances Macauley French, 

Miss Anna C. Buxton English 

Miss Nina K. VanDyne Mathematics and Spanish. 

Miss Helen Urquhart Latin and French. 

Miss Muriel M. Victor Elocution and Physical Culture, j 

Miss Kate McKimmon Primary School. 

Miss Mabel A. Horsley Preparatory Work. 

Miss Louise Hill Assistant. 

Music Department. 

Miss Martha A. Dowd, Director Piano, Theory. 

Miss Hermine R. Scheper Piano, Harmony. 

Miss Bertha May Luney Piano, Organ. 

Miss Susie Simms Battle Piano. 

Mr. R. Blinn Owen Voice, Organ. 

Miss F. Zulette Wilson Voice. 

Miss Marjory Sherwin Violin. 

Art Department Miss Clara Fenner, Director. 

Elocution Department Miss Muriel M. Victor, Director. 

Business Department Miss Lizzie H. Lee, Director. 

OTHER OFFICERS. 

Mrs. Lavinia Gretter Matron. 

Miss Eva Hardesty Housekeeper. 

Miss Lola E. Walton Matron of the Infirmary. 

Dr. A. W. Knox School Physician. 

Miss Lizzie H. Lee Bookkeeper. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



With the Faculty— The Teachers Old and New. 

The announcement of the changes among the teachers is usually for- 
mally made not long after the session is over. Of course, there are 
,many whispered bits of gossip in this connection among the girls during 
the spring, and in some cases rumors become almost certainties, but it is 
[only in rare cases that final good-byes are said at Commencement. We 
part from the teachers if not from the girls as if we expected to see them 
all back in their old places with the opening of the new session. 

And yet there are always changes, and this year quite as many as 
usual, and these changes are always among the most interesting bits of 
iconversation on school matters for the summer. The failure of the 
Muse to appear in June has delayed the talk somewhat this year but not 
prevented it, and many will enjoy the announcements even in Septem- 
ber, as a preliminary to the work of the new session. 

The chief officers of the School remain the same in 1910-11 : Mr. Lay, 
■Miss Thomas, Mr. Cruikshank, Miss Dowd, and the rest will be in their 
former places ; in the Music Department the change will be slight ; in 
the Academic Department there will be five new teachers ; and there 
will be a new head of the Elocution Department, and a new Matron. 

To speak first of those who leave us : Miss Jones, Miss Kellogg, and 
Miss Towers resigned in the spring. Miss Jones will continue her work 
:at Teachers' College, Columbia University, and take her degree next 
spring; Miss Kellogg will give up teaching; Miss Towers has not an- 
nounced her plans. In June Miss Brown resigned, and later Miss Dun- 
lap, who is in poor health. Miss Mclntyre leaves to be with her mother 
at home next year, and Miss Sallie Haywood Battle will also be at home. 
In the Music Faculty, Miss Neil's marriage took place in June and Miss 
Williams has given up teaching. Mrs. Leake completed her duties June 
Jlst and her successor was to have been Miss Bentley, but Miss Bentley's 
ill health precluded her continuing her work next year, and Mrs. Gretter 
will be the Matron. 

And now for a brief introduction to the newcomers, to each of whom 
;he Muse, in behalf of the student-body, extends a hearty welcome to 
St. Mary's. 



4 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Miss Frances Macauley, who will take charge of the French in suc- 
cession to Miss Kellogg, is already well known to the girls of last year 
as she assisted Miss Kellogg in the Department last spring. Her home 
is Detroit, and she was educated there in private schools, then went 
through the classical course at the Detroit High School, and after gradu- 
ation spent a year at the well-known school of Miss Comegys in Phila 
delphia. A student of French from early childhood, she then decided 
to specialize in that subject and went to France to continue her studies, 
spending two years there at the Univerite de Grenoble from which she 
received the "Certificat d'Etudes Francaises." Miss Macauley made a 
very pleasant impression on the girls last spring, and this impression 
will be strengthened the coming year. 

Miss Nina K. VanDyne, of New York City, who succeeds Miss Mar- 
garet Jones in charge of the Mathematics, comes from New York City 
and received her preliminary education in the city schools there, gradu- 
ating at the Wadleigh High School before entering Cornell. She spent 
four years at Cornell, where she paid special attention to mathematic 
and Romance Languages, and graduated there in June. Her record at 
Cornell was an excellent one and the prominent part she took in student 
life there presages a greater usefulness in the St. Mary's life. In addi- i 
tion to teaching the mathematics, Miss VanDyne will have charge of 
Spanish, courses in which will be offered this year for the first time. 

Miss Helen Urquhart, of Ashfield, Mass., will be in charge of the I 
Latin, in Miss Dunlap's place. She is of Southern parentage and comes 
from Massachusetts, where she was educated first at the Ashfield High 
School and then at the North Adams State Normal School. She entered 
Mount Holyoke College in 1907 and has just graduated there. In col- 
lege her major studies were Latin and French, and she will assist Miss! 
Macauley with the French. In the general side of the school life she 
is relied on to more or less take Miss Jones's place in inspiring the 
athletics, as she is fond of all kinds of athletic sports. Miss Urquhart 
is a Southerner by antecedents if not by residence, as her father went<| 
North from Alexandria, Virginia, and her mother was a Miss Slicer, ol 
Baltimore. 

The Elocution Department this year will be in charge of Miss Muriel 
M. Victor, of Arlington, N. J., who takes the place of Miss Brown 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Miss Victor has had considerable experience in private teaching and is 
very highly endorsed. Miss Victor's special training in elocution was 
had at the Hawn School of the Speech Arts in New York City, of which 
she holds the certificate. She also studied privately with several well- 
known teachers in New Jersey; with Dr. Henry Gaines Hawn, of the 
Hawn School ; for a year with Dr. S. S. Curry of the Curry School of 
Boston, at Columbia University, New York ; and with Mr. Barry of 
Columbia, at the Brooklyn Academy of Arts and Sciences. She took 
the Emerson system of physical culture with Mrs. Annie Newton Hart, 
of Newark ; the Southwick system with Mrs. Marion C. Jewell, of Ar- 
lington, and studied bodily expression with Miss Marie Sonn, of New- 
ark. Miss Victor has achieved much success as an elocutionist and has 
taken a prominent part in the elocution world. She is a member of the 
National Speech Arts Association, being a member of its Program Com- 
mittee, and also of the New York and New Jersey State associations. 

Miss Anna C. Buxton, of Winston-Salem, N. C, who takes Miss 
Towers's place in the English work, is an alumna? addition to the fac- 
ulty. She is the daughter of Hon. J. C. Buxton, of Winston-Saleni, 
and was a St. Mary's girl in 1902-03. After leaving St. Mary's she 
entered Bryn Mawr and remained there three years, up to the begin- 
ning of her Senior year. Since leaving college she has been living at 
home and teaching in the Winston schools. She is very popular in Win- 
ston and her friends believe will be equally popular at St. Mary's. 

Miss E. Zulette Wilson will take the place of Miss Neil (who is now 
Mrs. Decker) in the Voice Department. Miss Wilson made a most 
pleasant impression on the Rector when he met her in New York last 
spring, and also on Miss Florence Slater and Miss Wickham, well 
known to St. Mary's girls, for whom she sang. Miss Wilson is a 
native of Waterbury, Conn., where she received her education in 
private schools, the last of them the well-known St. Margaret's, a 
church school of note. Miss Wilson's first teacher was George E. 
Boyd, of Waterbury ; from him she went to New York to continue her 
lessons with Frederick Bristol, with whom she studied four years, sing- 
ing meantime in choirs and as a soloist. From New York she went to 
Paris for a summer's study with Juliani, who says of her : "I am proud 
of her lovely voice and fine intelligence." On her return from Paris 



6 The St. Mary's Muse. 

she continued her church work and concert singing, and during the win- 
ter of 1908 studied with Richard T. Percy in New York, a well-known 
coach. Her teaching experience has been with private pupils and for 
a time in a church school in St. Louis. All of her instructors speak 
very highly of her. 

Miss Louise Hill, of Lexington, who comes as an assistant, is the other 
alumnse addition to the teaching force. She was here as a student from 
1905 to 1907, when she graduated with credit. Since that time she has 
been at home teaching music and in the graded schools of Lexington. 



THE SIXTY-EIGHTH COMMENCEMENT. 

Friends from far and near, nature "decked in wreathed smiles," 
everything combined to celebrate propitiously the graduation of the 
largest class in the history of St. Mary's. 

The events of the memorable week began with the forceful, uplifting 
message of Bishop Tucker, of Virginia, on Sunday morning. On 
Monday night the auditorium was filled by an enthusiastic audience to 
hear the Dramatic Club in "She Stoops to Conquer," a performance 
ranking easily with the best ever given at the School. 

The Rector's reception was held on Tuesday night, and in passing 
we may say that the naive enjoyment of the Seniors in displaying their 
first trains was refreshing to see. 

Senior Class Day, on Wednesday, was signalized by the appearance 
of a special comet with many a message or fun-provoking remembrance 
for teacher and pupil alike. The Art Exhibit, the meetings of the 
Alumnse and of the Trustees were all well attended. 

At night occurred the Annual Concert, greatly enjoyed by a large 
and appreciative audience. 

The stage of the auditorium was completely filled, with a large num- 
ber of Trustees, the seventeen graduates and the Rector with his table 
full of awards and distinctions. 

Dr. Smith, of Washington, who delivered the graduating address, 
endeared himself to all by his witty, kindly and helpful talk; the Salu- 
tatory, Valedictory and Essay were excellent. After the awarding of 
the various school honors, the diplomas were given, as usual, in the 
chapel, with a brief but elevating message by the Bishop of Georgia. 






The St. Mary's Muse. 



Sunday, May 22. 

11:00 a. m. — The Commencement Sermon. 
From the News and Observer: 

The commencement exercises at St. Mary's School began on Sunday morning in 
the Chapel at St. Mary's, where there gathered a great congregation of students and 
friends to hear the commencement sermon, preached by the Rt. Rev. Beverly Tucker, 
D.D., Bishop of Southern Virginia, whose sermon had in it the thought of the 
personal call to young women to seek Christ and that Christianity was based on 
the personality of Jesus Christ. 

The entry of the students of St. Mary's into the Chapel at commencement season 
is always a beautiful sight, and it was unusually so on Sunday, the day being an 
ideal one, spring time in its perfection, the long procession of young women in 
white giving an added touch of beauty to the attractiveness of the surroundings. 
In the details of the service there was the sense of the uplift of the day and especially 
so in the music in which the student body and visitors all took part alike, singing 
as one great chorus, "Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God Almighty," and the other hymns, 
and ending with "Glorious Things of Thee Are Spoken, Zion City of Our Lord." 

While the commencement sermon was preached by Bishop Tucker, there also took 
part in the services Bishop Joseph Blount Cheshire, of the Diocese of North Carolina, 
and Rev. Geo. W. Lay, Rector of St. Mary's, these reading the lessons of the day and 
the various parts of the service. The offering for the day was for the Thompson 
Orphanage at Charlotte, the idea of commencement gifts for so noble a cause being 
a most beautiful one. 

There was close attention given to Bishop Tucker in his presentation of the theme 
which he had chosen for the day. He spoke without manuscript, his voice clear and 
resonant, his pulpit presence impressive, a man of years and dignity. It was of the 
personal idea in Christianity of which he preached, and the application was that 
the personality of Christ's life might cause all the young women who heard to accept 
the invitation of mankind's Saviour to "come and see." 

Bishop Tucker announced as his text the words from the thirty-eighth and 
thirty-ninth verses of the first chapter of the gospel according to St. John. "Then 
Jesus turned and saw them following and saith unto them, What seek ye? They 
said unto him, Rabbi, (which is to say, being interpreted, Master) where dwellest 
thou ? He saith unto them, Come and see. They came and saw where he dwelt, 
and abode with him that day: for it was about the tenth hour." 

With this text as the theme of his discourse, Bishop Tucker preached a strong 
sermon, in which as a thread of gold in the weaving there was in it the central 
thought that Christianity is based on a personality, that Christ is that personality, 
and that the graduates who pass from the instruction of college halls should find 
in the personality of Jesus Christ the all-compelling cause to influence their lives, 
and that taking Jesus Christ as their exemplar, having heeded the admonition, "Come 
and see," they can realize their desires and find the fulfillment of their dreams. 
His sermon was one which had in it the teaching, the seeking, finding and abiding 
with Jesus Christ is the best thing in life. 



8 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Bishop Tucker emphasized the possibilities in life for the young women whom he 
addressed, and that for all the realizations of their dreams they must look to the 
Christ, and see him in the paths before them. He directed attention to the fact that 
ambition and pleasure and other things would call aside with the idea that these 
would give the best in life, but that in their hearts they would learn the broader 
horizon and the wider life is only to be had through seeking and finding Christ, that 
in him all dreams would be realized and immortality would be found, that walking 
side by side with him we could do the things which would lead to the higher, bettei 
life. The intellectual life might call aside, but this should not lead us away fror 
Christ, that he came that we might have life and have it more abundantly. In hia 
closing remarks Bishop Tucker emphasized the idea that the ideal in life should 
the seeking of Christ, and that no matter in what sphere, despite all temptations, 
there should be heed given to that blessed voice which says, "Come and see." 

Monday, May 23. 

4:00 p. m. — The Art Exhibit. 

The annual exhibit of the Art Department of St. Mary's was held in the school 
studio Monday afternoon from 4 to 6 o'clock. The work of this year proved excej 
tionally good and showed that the well-planned course of study had been intelligently 
carried out, and that there are pupils of promise among the art workers. 

The work of the first-year pupils included outline drawings in pencil of blocks: 
shaded pencil still-life groups; plants from life; outline pencil drawings of heads 
hands and feet from casts; original conventional designs suitable for stenciling. Of 
this pencil work the best was probably Michael Angelo's slave head, by Evelyi 
Jackson, which showed much strength. 

The work of the second year was represented by charcoal drawings from still life 
and casts, and pen and ink work. Among the best examples of still-life drawings 
were: Japanese lanterns, by Mary Morgan Myers; plate and apples, by Helen Robin- 
son; potato and basket group, by Rebecca Wood; jug and sabots, by Elizabeth Lay. 
Still-life groups by Mildred Yates and Frances Park, who have had but one lesson 
a week for the year, show very creditable work. Good examples of cast drawings 
were two slave heads (Michael Angelo), by Nell Lewis; head of young Csesar, by 
Mildred Brown; feet and hands by Evelyn Maxwell. 

There was excellent pen and ink work showing the Greek, Roman and Saracenic 
styles of historic ornament, and good still-life work in pen and ink by Emma 
Williams. 

The water-color work was also strong, the still-life groups from the object being 
most noticeable. A Japanese study and a banana group, by Hilda Broadwood; plate 
and apples, by Katherine Parker; bread and cheese, by Martha Byrd Spruill, were 
among the best. Susie Everitt's flower work from life was particularly good, her 
wistaria in Japanese wall basket being exceptional. 

An interesting and valuable feature of the water-color work was the hour and a 
half "time sketches," all done from life and completed in the specified time. Another 
department of the water-color work which showed much originality and thought j 
as well as technique, was that of original design. The best examples of this were: 



The St. Mart's Muse. 9 

hanging lamp in wrought iron, by Nell Lewis; stained glass window, a conventional 
rose design, by Hilda Broadwood; mosaic tiling, by Martha Byrd Spruill; wall paper 
designs, by Hilda Broadwood and Susie Everitt. 

Venetian scenes by Katherine Parker and Tinsley Harrison, and a Dutch scene 
by Margaret Erwin were good. 

The oil work was all by Margaret Barber and Nell Lewis and was excellent for 
first-year painting. Japanese lanterns by Margaret Barber and fruit study by Nell 
Lewis were among the best. The two-hour time sketches also showed good work. 

Stenciled curtains and cushions illustrated the work in applied design. The 
wistaria and grape designs were good, and all the decorations had been made from 
original designs. The work of Frances Park and Henrietta Schwartz was good in 
this department. 

The whole exhibit reflected great credit upon the director of this department, 
Miss Clara Fenner, who has been in charge for several years, and whose work each 
year shows growth and new power. 

8 :30 p. m. — The Elocution Recital. 

"She Stoops to Conquer." 

An audience that filled the body of the Auditorium and overflowed 
into the balcony came together on Monday night to see the Dramatic 
Club in "She Stoops to Conquer," and as the people left at the con- 
clusion of the play, it was gratifying to hear on all sides the flattering 
expressions of praise of the peiformance. 

Miss Brown, the teacher of Expression, has evidently given great 
care and effort to the training of her girls, for the performance was 
distinguished by the clear enunciation, which made it possible to hear 
every speaker distinctly in all parts of the Auditorium, and by the 
ease with which the players dropped their individuality and assumed 
the characters which they were playing. 

Where all the parts were well taken it may seem invidious to single 
out any special ones, but Mary Owen's interpretation of Mr. Hard- 
castle, a country gentleman of the 18th century, with very decided 
convictions, was remarkably well done ; and to those of us who know 
Byrd Henderson, she is entitled to great credit for losing herself so 
thoroughly in the role of Mrs. Hardcastle. 

The "suitors" (a word which needs no interpretation to those 
familiar with Saturday nights at St. Mary's), Fannie Lamb Haugh- 
ton and Helen MacArthur, were as irresistible to Kate Hardcastle 
(Tinsley Harrison — and what should we do without her as our 
ingenue!) and Constance Neville (Katherine Small) as they were to 

2 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 

the audience. To say that Tony Lumpkin was Nell Lewis and Nell 
Lewis was a real Tony Lumpkin is to express a universal comment. 
If there is any part besides a, landlord, or the servant Dig-gory, or an 
old-time darkey, or a steam piano, that Bessie Barnwell can take, we 
do not know it by experience. 

The play, as a whole, is one of the best we have ever had at St. 
Mary's and added very much to the enjoyment of the Commence- 
ment season. M. M. J. 

This was the cast: 

Young Marlow Fannie Lamb Haughtoi 

Squire Hardcastle Mary Owei 

George Hastings Helen McArthui 

Tony Lumpkin Nell Lewis 

Stingo — Landlord of "The Three Pigeons" ^ „ . _ 

_ . I Bessie Barnwel 

Diggary j 

Aminadab I Elizabeth Boyc 

Dick j J 

13 ° L Katharine Parker 

Roger j 

Mrs. Hardcastle Byrd Hendersoi 

Kate Hardcastle Tinsley Harrisoi 

Constance Neville Katherine Smal 

Maid Mary Louise Manning 

Music was rendered by the St. Mary's Orchestra under the direction 
of Mr. R. Blinn Owen. 

Wednesday, May 25. 

11:00 a. m. — The Class Day Exercises. 

The class-day exercises at St. Mary's yesterday were characterized by striking 
originality. Differing from the ordinary class day, the exercises occurred under the 
great oaks on the campus. A temporary rostrum decorated in white had been 
prepared for the president of the class. On the table, which also was decorated in 
white, was a beautiful vase of the class flower, Sweet Peas. On either side was a 
row of seats for the members of the Senior class. In front were seats for the audi- 
ence, which proved to be sufficient for only a small part of those who came to witness 
the exercises. 

The class, consisting of eighteen members, which is the largest graduating class 
in the sixty-eight years of the existence of the college, made their appearance from 
East Rock about eleven o'clock, headed by Miss Rebecca Hill Shields, president of 
the class, and Mr. Stone, honorary member. The class made a very pretty appear- 
ance as they marched forth in white costumes, carrying a great daisy chain and* 
singing their college song, "Alma Mater," which continued until they reached the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 

place for the exercises. The daisy chain was dropped on the grass, where it lay like 
It monster serpent so far as shape was concerned. 

First came the class history, read by Miss Paula Hazard, historian. She began 
with the Freshman class of 190G, presenting in an interesting narrative the events 
)f the four years of college life. 

The class has the distinction of having two songs of its own, composed by Mr. 
T. E. Hodgson. The one entitled "Happy" was sung here, after which came the 
greatest part of the program, creating an uproar of laughter — a new comet. 

The comet did not come unpredicted. The president called upon Miss Mary Shuford 
;o announce its approach. Evident skepticism was abroad, when suddenly from the 
5ast Rock came the strange visitor with a magnificent star for a nucleus and a 
;ail rivaling that of Halley's comet, being a piece of linen trailing far back through 
the air as Miss Janie DuBose made a swift approach. 

The mission of Miss DuBose was to make prophesies concerning each member of 
'.he class. Moving quickly here and there she stopped before each and made the 
prophesies in the first person, closing each time by representing the person as saying 
"T'm just too cute for words." 

Miss Hines read the faculty poem, presenting various gifts to members of the 
acuity, some of which were of considerable value. Upon one three degrees were 
Conferred, rolls of paper representing miniature diplomas being presented. Much 
nerriment was caused by donating to one member of the faculty a cigar, which when 
Lelivered proved to be a cigarette. 

The last will and testament, read by Miss Ida Rogerson, was full of sparkling 
lumor, being especially good in a few well-put personalities. 

This ended the exercises under the oaks. The procession was formed again, the 
laisy chain taken up and the college song begun where it was left off at the first, 
ind the crowd followed to Main Building, where a sprig of ivy was planted, by 
vhich the class should be remembered. The president read Dickens' beautiful little 
Jvy poem, after which she knelt and planted the sprig. 

It now remained to adopt a tree. Forming a procession as before, the class 
parched back into the campus, stopping by a small maple which had been selected 
|md around which was tied a bow of white ribbon. The daisy chain was laid in a 
■ircle around the tree. Joining hands the class, and Mr. Stone also, skipped merrily 
iround the tree, to the right and then to the left, singing the other class song, "I'm 
fust Too Cute for Words." 

The Seniors with a few of their freinds were entertained by Mrs. G. W. Lay after 
he exercises. 

8 :30 p. m. — The Annual Concert. 

The commencement concert given last night at St. Mary's School closed an inter- 
esting series of pupils' recitals for the year. Those taking part were from all 
lepartments of the Music School, and showed, besides individual talent, excellent 
knd thorough training. The auditorium was filled, and with its many lights and 
lowers and its artistically arranged stage produced a charming effect. 

The program opened at 8:30 with two chorus numbers, the second of which, 
'Dreaming," by Harry Rowe Shelley, was exceptionally well done. 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 

This was followed by Weber's "Rondo Brilliante," played by Miss Mary Gaither, 
Miss Gaither shows a well-advanced and sure technie, and her playing is character- 
ized by brilliancy. 

Ruff's well-known Cavatina was played by Miss Margaret Erwin. Much improve 
ment and considerable temperament is shown in Miss Erwin's playing. She waf 
accompanied by her sister, Miss Bessie Erwin. 

In the Chopin number — Prelude — Miss Shuford showed careful work. 

A trio, consisting of Misses Nannie Lee, Paula Hazard and Bessie Barnwell, san{, 
"Song at Sunrise," by Manney. This is a charming song and was well done. 

Miss Mary Mitchell Chamberlain played Rachmaninoff's familiar Prelude in ( 
minor, and a Norwegian Serenade, by Ole Olsen. The latter is a charming and i 
dainty number, and was particularly well played. Miss Chamberlain's playing showi 
authority, excellent technique and musicianship. 

In the playing of Faust Fantasie by Alard, Miss Emelie Rose Knox played tb 
"Faust Fantasie" with good tone, brilliant technique and musicianly appreciation o 
the melodies and rhythm. 

MacDowell's "Idyll" and "Shadow Dance" were played by Miss Rebecca Shields 
Miss Shields was at her best in the first number, which she gave with a delicacy am 
grace only acquired with an understanding of the composition. 

Miss Nannie Lee sang "I Love Thee," by Huhn, and "Good Night," by Densmon 
Miss Lee has a clear soprano voice which shows careful training. 

"From the Carnival," by Grieg, was played by Miss Ella Dorroh, who is a talent&j 
pianist. She has a clear and certain technique which she uses to advantage in th 
interpretation of her work. 

The closing number on the program was Saint Saen's "Evening Wind," sung by 
well-drilled chorus of eight voices, with violin obligato by Misses Mabel King an 
Margaret Erwin. 

For the excellent training and shading of the choruses, much credit is due Mis 
Neil. 

The music faculty of St. Mary's is to be congratulated upon the work it ha 
accomplished during the past year. The coming year's work will be looked forwar 
to with interest. 

This is the full program: 

PART ONE. 

(a) "He Gave Me a Rose" Cadma 

( 6 ) "Dreaming" Harry Rowe Shelle 

Chorus 
First Soprano Second Soprano 

Misses Nannie Lee Misses Paula Hazard 

Lena Everett Exum Meares 

Mary L. Manning Lilias Pratt 

Altos 
Misses Aimee Moore 
Julia Borden 
Helena Smith 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 

! Rondo Brilliante Weber 

Miss Maby Gaither 

• Cavatina Raff 

Miss Margaret .Erwin 
(Accompanied by Miss Bessie Erwin) 

: Preludes Nos. 20, 4, 10, 15 Chopin 

Miss Mary Shueord 

"Song at Sunrise Manney 

Misses Nannie Lee, Paula Hazard, and 
Elizabeth Barnwell 

(a) Prelude, C sharp minor Rachmaninoff 

( 6 ) Serenade Ole Olsen 

Miss Mary Mitchell Chamberlain 

PART TWO. 

Faust Fantasie Alard 

Miss Emilie Rose Knox 

I (a) Idylle MacDowell 

I { b ) Shadow Dance MacDowell 

Miss Rebecca Hill Shields 

(a) "I Love Thee" Huhn 

(6) "Good Night" Densmore 

Miss Nannie Davis Lee 

From the Carnival Grieg 

Miss Ella Doeroh 
'The Evening Wind" Saint-Saens 

Chorus 
(With violin obligato by Miss Margaret Erwin and 
Miss Mabel King) 
First Soprano Second Soprano 

Misses Lucy Dortch Misses Paula Hazard 

Lena Everett Exuh Meares 

Mary L. Manning Helena Smith 

Lilias Pratt 

Altos 
Misses Bessie Barnwell 
Aimee Moore 

Thursday, May 26. 

11 :00 a. m. — The Graduating Exercises. 

The final exercises of the St. Mary's commencement occurred on Thursday morn- 
ing. A pleasing variety was the striking characteristic of the well rendered pro- 
gram. Numerous flowers effectively decorated the stage of the auditorium and the 






14 The St. Mary's Muse. 

chapel. Diplomas were awarded to seventeen graduates, which is the largest num 
ber in the history of the institution. The annual address was made by Dr. C. E 
Smith, rector of St. Thomas' Church, Washington, D. C. 

The graduating exercises were held in the auditorium, while the diplomas wer 
awarded in the chapel. On the stage, besides the graduating class were Rev. G. W 
Lay, rector, who presided; Dr. C. E. Smith, who made the address; the trustees an 
the clergy. The senior class made a pretty appearance in white costumes, and be 
fore the exercises were over they were presented with a multitude of flowers, consis 
ing of lilies, roses of every variety, oak leaves, daisies and sweet peas, the class 
flower. These flowers converted the stage into a bower of beauty. 

The first number on the program was an impromptu by Reinhold, played by Miss 
Ella Dorroh. Miss Dorroh plays with an ease and assurance which come with a pure 
technique. Her interpretation of this number was artistic. 

The salutatory by Miss Virginia Randolph Pickel was very brief, consisting of a 
few appropriate sentences addressed first to those closely connected with the school 
and then to the guests. 

With dignity, grace and musical feeling, Miss Julia Borden gave an excellent inter- 
pretation of the "Elegy," by Nollet. 

An unusually strong class essay was that read by Miss Mary Mitchell Chamber- 
lain, on the subject, "The Call of the Country." In a previous competition for the 
position of honor this essay was given first place. It contained first a discussion 
of the influences which have drawn the people to the cities, education, conveniences 
and the necessity of making a living. The country life when viewed in contrast with 
the city life proved unattractive. "The present high prices may prove a blessing in 
disguise by turning the people back to the country. Education took them away and : 
education will bring them back." The advantages of the country over the city were 
presented in an effective manner, "the country as it was, as it now is, and as it will 
be, with the old farm organized on a new ideal." 

"My Heart and Thine," by Allitsen, was sung by Miss Mary Louise Manning, who 
is the possessor of a sweet and well trained soprano voice. In the piano accompani- 
ment by Miss Dorroh and the violin obligato by Miss Emilie Rose Knox, Miss Man- 
ning was well supported. 

Literary Address. 

"Education" was the subject of the annual address, delivered by Dr. Smith. "He 
reminds me of Vance," one remarked after the address. The allusion was to the 
extraordinary ability to combine serious thought with humor. An occasional joke or 
unexpected turn to an illustration brought forth great applause and laughter. The 
address was twenty minutes long, as to time, but many times longer measured in 
the thought contained. 

"Do you believe in education?" the speaker asked. "Then, what are you doing 
for it?" 

Activity was presented as the one conclusive proof. The central government, the 
States and millionaires are pouring out millions of dollars for education. Parents 
are making great sacrifices for the sake of education, some spending 50 per cent or 
more of their earnings. Many who were born in poor circumstances are willing to 
spend and be spent for education. 



\ 






The St. Mary's Muse. 15 

Dr. Smith said there are two kinds of education: That which fits us to do some- 
thing and that which teaches us what to be. Knowledge is power; knowledge is 
wealth. "Get knowledge, young ladies," he said. "Get it any where; get it in any 
place, and you will have power and wealth." 

The time has come when no wealth or social position can take the place of educa- 
tion. The ancients relied upon the wealth and social position of parents, but edu- 
cation is now necessary to fit one for the place his parents have. 

"This is a woman's day," the speaker declared. "It is the time in the affairs 
of man which taken at the flood leads on to fortune." He showed how women are 
even crowding men out of their positions. 

Turning from the education for power and wealth, he said: "It is far better to 
think of education as teaching us what to be." The great difficulty today is that 
training of what we are to do and to be can not be had under the same roof. The 
public school teaches what we are to do, leaving what we are to be to be taught by 
the Sunday School. The ideal condition is to get these two things together. In a 
church school such as St. Mary's the two are welded together. 

Turning to the class he said: "Do not think too much of yourselves." The advice 
which followed along this line was clothed in new character by its manner of presen- 
tation. 

Education is just beginning with graduation. When Newton came to die he was 
still like a child gathering pebbles of knowledge. 

He emphasized the necessity of abstaining from reading light, trashy literature. 
Along with books it is a good thing to graduate in such things as sewing and cooking. 

There are three kinds of aristocracy: 

First: The aristocracy of birth. This is a thing of the past, where birth alone 
was relied upon. 

Second: The aristocracy of wealth. People are now coming to look for something 
more than wealth in a man. 

Third: The aristocracy of service. This will never grow old. 

The valedictory was next read by Miss Paula Elizabeth Hazard, who won the 
position of valedictorian by winning the highest honors in her class. 

The rector then read the awards of honor, distinctions and prizes, each girl so 
distinguished passing to the stage to receive her badge or other award amid the 
applause of her schoolmates and the audience. 

This closed the exercises in the Auditorium. 

The most impressive part of the graduating exercises was the presentation of col- 
lege diplomas, which occurred in the chapel, the procession being one of the most 
beautiful features of the day. 

Led by the little tots of the kindergarten, followed by the student body, all in 
pure white, the lines opened at the chapel door forming a line on each side of the 
walk, through which the choir, trustees, clergy, bishop, graduates and faculty passed 
into the chapel, singing as a processional the hymn, "Ten Thousand Times Ten 
Thousand." The scripture lesson was read by Bishop Strange, of Wilmington. Fol- 
lowing this came the creed, prayers, and the hymn, "Ancient of Days." The Rector 
then called the names of the graduates and Bishop Chesire presented the diplomas. 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Bishop Cheshire then called upon Bishop Reese, of Savannah, to speak a few parting 
words to the graduates. In a five minutes heart-to-talk he dwelt upon religious 
matters. Then followed the prayers and benediction and the recessional hymn, 
"Jerusalem High Tower." 

This was the program in full: 

Tn the Auditorium. 

Impromptu Reinhold 

Ella Dorboh. 
Salutatory — Virginia Randolph Bolling Pickel. 

Elegy Nollet 

Julia Borden. 

Class Essay — Mary Mitchell Chamberlain. 

My Heart is Thine Allitsen 

Mary Louise Manning. 
Accompanied by Ella Dorroh. Violin Obligato, Emilie Rose Knox. 

Address — Rev. C. Ernest Smith, D.D., D.C.L. 

Valedictory — Paula Elizabeth Hazard. 

Announcement of Honors. 

Presentation of Diplomas, Certificates and Distinctions. 

In the Chapel. 

Processional Hymn, No. 396 — Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand, 

Scripture Lesson. 

Benedictus. 

Creed. 

Prayers. 

Hymn 311 — Ancient of Days. 

Presentation of the College Diplomas. 

Address to Graduates. 

Prayers and Benediction. 

Recessional Hymn — Jerusalem High Tower. 

The Commencement Awards of 1910. 
The College Class of 1910. 

Mary Mitchell Chamberlain West Raleigh, N. C. 

Julia Fisher Coke Raleigh, N. C. 

Grace Trueman Deaton Raleigh, N. C. 

Irma Deaton Raleigh, N. C. 

Lena Payne Everett Rockingham, N. C. 

Minnie Tamplet Hazard Georgetown, S. C. 

Paula Elizabeth Hazard (First Honor) Georgetown, S. C. 

Alice Leigh Hines Kinston, N. C. 



The St. Mart's Muse. IT 



Sarah Vernon Holloway Enfield, N. C. 

Nannie Davis Lee Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Ruth Mardre Windsor, N. C. 

Laura Meares Asheville, N. C. 

Alice Noble Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Virginia Randolph Boiling Pickel (Second Honor) Raleigh, N. C. 

Ida Jean Rogerson Edenton, N. C. 

Ha Adele Rountree Wilmington, X. C. 

Rebecca Hill Shields Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Mary Campbell Shuford Hickory, N. C. 

Certificate in the English Course. 
Jane Porcher DuBose Columbia, S. C. 

Certificates in the Music Department. 

in PIANO. 

Ella Dorroh Greenville, S. C. 

Rebecca Hill Shields Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Mary Campbell Shuford Hickory, N. C. 

IN ORGAN. 

Ha Adele Rountree Wilmington, N. C. 

Diplomas in the Business Department. 

Fannie Lamb Haughton Washington, N. C. 

Emma Isabel Haynes Raleigh, N. C 

Kate McMackin McDonald Raleigh, N. C. 

Eliza Pender Tarboro, N. C. 

Certificate in the Business Department. 

in bookkeeping. 

Katherine Sanderson Small Washington, N. C. 

The Honor r^oll. 
The highest general award of merit open to all Upper Preparatory and College 
pupils is the Honor Roll. The requirements are: 

( 1 ) The pupil must have been in attendance the entire session and have been 
absent from no duty at any time during the session without the full consent of the 
Rector, and with lawful excuse. 

(2) She must have had during the year a full regular course of study or its 
equivalent, and have carried this work to successful completion, taking all required 
examinations. 

(3) She must have maintained a record of "Very Good" (90 per cent) or better 
in her studies. 

(4) She must have had a record of "Excellent" in Deportment. 

(5) She must have maintained a generally satisfactory bearing in the affairs of 
her school life during the year. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 

The Honor Roll of 1910. 

Helen Caldwell Areson. Virginia Randolph Boiling Pickel. 

Mary Mitchell Chamberlain. Mary Gladys Redwood. 

Julia Fisher Coke. Ha Adele Rountree. 

Irma Deaton. Rebecca Hill Shields. 

Ella Dorroh. Bertha Helena Smith. 

Paula Elizabeth Hazard. Florence Douglas Stone. 

Alice Leigh Hines. Frances Strong. 

Rebecca Merritt. Josephine Tonnoffski. 

Mary Alice Perry. Rebecca Bennehan Wood. 

Alice Noble. 

Primary Department. 
The Roll of Honor. 

Elizabeth McMorine Folk Virginia Royster. 

Katharine Hughes. Lucy Fitzhugh Lay. 

Alice Giersch. 

To be Commended for Progress in the Studies of the Department. 
Lillias Shepherd. Florence Leftwich Harrison. 

Special Prizes. 

The Muse Prizes. 

The Muse prizes — copies of the annual Muse — presented by the Managers of the 
Muse to the students who by their written or artistic contributions have done most i 
to help the annual and monthly Muse during the current year, was awarded in 
1910 to— 

NELL BATTLE LEWIS— for her work in illustrating the Annual Muse; and to 
ELIZABETH HUGHES— for her work on the Monthly Muse. 

The Bishop Parker Botany Prize. 

The Bishop Parker Botany Prize, given by Rt. Rev. Edward M. Parker, Bishop 
Co-adjutor of New Hampshire, is awarded to that pupil who in accordance with 
certain published conditions does the best work in the preparation of a herbarium. 

The prize in 1910 was awarded to 

Nell Battle Lewis. 
With honorable mention of 

Elizabeth Atkinson Lay. 



The Niies Medal. 

The highest award for the work of the session as determined by a 
comparison of general averages is the jSTiles Medal. 

The jSTiles Medal for General Excellence was instituted in 1906 by 
the Reverend Charles Martin Niles, D.D. It is awarded to the pupil 
who has made the best record in scholarship and deportment during 
the session, subject to the following conditions: 



: 



The St. Mary's Muse. 19 

The requirements for eligibility are: 

(1) The pupil must have taken throughout the year at least 15 
points of regular work; and have satisfactorily completed this work, 
passing all required examinations. 

(2) The pupil must have been Excellent in Deportment. 

(3) The pupil must have taken all regular general courses assigned 
and done satisfactory work in them. 

(4) The pupil must be a regular student of the College Department. 
The Medal is awarded to the same pupil only once. 

The highest average of the year 1909-10 was that of Miss Paula Eliz- 
abeth Hazard, Class of 1910, of Georgetown, S. C, whose average was 
95.83 per cent. Miss Hazard was awarded the medal in 1907, when 
it was awarded for the second time, and was accordingly not eligible to 
receive it again. 

The medal was accordingly awarded to Miss Virginia Randolph Boil- 
ing Pickel, Class of 1910, of Raleigh, 1ST. C, whose average was 95.44 
per cent. 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Salutatory of 1910. 



Virginia Randolph Bolling Pickel. 



Some of our severest Senior struggles this year have been with 
Catullus, but he has done us one good turn. By a slight modification 
in his meaning he furnishes an apt quotation for the salutatoriau He 
says, somewhat changing the meaning: 

"Welcome, dear gathering of friends, whom, having come together by 
various paths, diverse callings will carry away again." 

This is Graduation Day. It is the magnet which has drawn us all 
together from various places, over diverse ways. Soon we shall all be 
scattered, but for the present: 

"Welcome, dear gathering of friends !" The Senior Class extends 
its warmest greetings to you, honored Bishops and Trustees ; to you, 
kind Rector, beloved Lady Principal, and Faculty ; to you, dear school- 
mates, and to our parents, and to our guests. 



The Class Essay of 1910. 



Mary Mitchell Chamberlain. 



The Call of the Country. 

Our colonial ancestors came to this country with the feeling of 
escape from crowded European communities to a land of freedom and 
of limitless space. They gloried in the fact that they possessed land 
with nobody to dispute that possession. You remember how Daniel 
Boone moved farther West because he felt crowded, having a neighbor 
within twelve miles. It was this intense love for land that induced 
our forefathers to take up farms and try to win bread from the soil ; 
and for this reason only two per cent of our people lived in towns in 
1815. 'Now over fifty per cent live in cities. The great increase in 
the number and size of our cities is due to migration from the country 
and to foreign immigration, but it is of the first named cause that I 
am going to speak. Since the Civil War all over the country, but 
especially in the South, there has been a great growth of cities and 
towns, for after the break-up of the old plantations worked by slaves, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 21 

thousands of people have nocked to the great towns to seek a fortune 
there. It was the influx of Northern capital which made it possible 
for these men to succeed. We read in Uncle Remus how the old man 
went to "Lantamatanterum" with the white folks, but he did not like it 
there; he preferred living on the plantation. Just so are there not 
reasons for our leaving crowded cities to live in the country ? Let us 
not return to the plantation type of farming, but to a new type, that 
. of an intelligent labor and constructive production. 

But what is it that has made the people leave the country in such 
numbers ? The first thing of all is the necessity of making a living. 
The landlord moved to the city where he could become a business man, 
renting his land to immigrant or negro tenants. Many of these land- 
lords have built up great mills and factories all over the South, as 
well as in the North, and have called upon intelligent white labor to 
be their workers. Another attraction to the city is that of education; 
for the man who moves to the city knows that his children stand a 
better chance of getting a book education than if he remains in the 
country. • City schools are far ahead of country schools, being sup- 
ported by more population and more money; and the people have a 
more compelling sense of the need of an education. If a man is going 
to live on the farm, what need has he of book learning ? they say. Be- 
sides educating its children the city provides conveniences in house- 
keeping and in living little dreamed of in the country. Electricity, 
gas, waterworks, furnaces, street cars, are a few of the conveniences 
to be had in the cities. One can get his bread baked, his meat killed 
and dressed, his milk already milked — and skimmed. Some people's 
idea of paradise is a heaven of outward comfort. 

No one can blame the overworked wives of the farmers for desiring 
the conveniences to be had in the city. In the first place, all improve- 
ments are put into the barn instead of being put, some of them, into 
the house. How often have you seen a beautiful, well cared for barn 
and a little old broken-down farm house hardly large enough for the 
family. A woman has to do things that her too often shiftless hus- 
band should do, such as work the garden, milk the cows, and then turn 
them to pasture. It is the very fact that the children see their mother 
such a drudge that makes the daughters hesitate to live on a farm and 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 

the sons to ask a girl to do so. Wives have no time to stop and read or 
think an uplifting thought; all the sweetness of living is worked out 
of them, and they either dry up, so to speak, or — a good many of 
them I am sorry to say — go mad. This comes from the fact that the 
wives are veritable prisoners, having scarcely any chance to go away 
from home to see other people or get any needed recreation. All the 
errands into town are done by the men. 

In speaking of the superior city schools, I did not mention the fact 
that the sort of training received by students takes them away from 
the country. The same might also be said of the country schools them- 
selves. In North Carolina, the country schools are short in term and 
narrow in scope. In the more populous North and West they are 
better, but all open to the same objection, that no stress is laid on the 
needs and problems of agricultural life, and hence the allurements of 
the city are not offset by any resistance of sentiment or of conviction. 
Almost all children are receiving some sort of schooling; almost none 
are being educated for happy country dwellers. Sons and daughters 
sent to town to school find there all the conveniences lacking in their 
simple, rural homes ; find pleasant companionship and many amuse- 
ments ; see women doing their own work with ease and a light heart, 
having time also for recreation. The sons may learn system and even 
study new farming methods and resolve that they will not farm unless 
they can do so on a business and scientific basis. The daughters, con- 
ceiving a thorough dislike for the hopeless drudgery at home, and feel- 
ing themselves fitted for something better, as they think, desire to 
marry some young business employee, or to learn stenography as an 
alternative. Anything to get away from the farm and its deprivations. 

In farming, according to the prevailing loose methods, the farmer 
does not know where his next cent, is coming from. He is dependent 
upon artificial conditions of prices controlled by middlemen, "corners," 
the trusts. These agencies adulterate goods, and pocket the differ- 
ence, the fault coming back upon the agriculturists. That is one rea- 
son why farming has become unprofitable in the East. Also, the price 
of farm labor is fixed by the factory wage ; and the farmer, after paying 
so dearly for his work-hands, has no returns left for himself. This 
scarcity of farm labor has given rise to modern inventions of time- and 



The St. Mary's Muse. 23 

labor-saving machinery. The present high prices of all produce, while 
it seems a great evil, may be a blessing in disguise in that it may 
turn the hearts of the young people back to the country. Education 
has taken them away and education will bring them back. As the 
sons have looked down upon farming as an unprofitable pursuit, so 
with proper education they can make it a profitable business to be run 
as any other enterprise, that is — with a system. The daughters will 
learn to understand that while some hardships are necessary to life on 
the farm as belonging to its very nature, a good many more may be 
remedied by a little forethought and consideration on the farmer's part. 
These girls, filled with enthusiasm for their work, will no longer be 
drudges or stenographers, but will prefer to live in the country and 
make something of the life there. We must remember that conve- 
niences come partially from the presence of a closely built up com- 
munity, and that increased population in the country means increased 
comforts of life, better roads, better schools, better churches, increased 
prosperity of the country at large. 

Upon the practical side of life is built the ideal. Upon prosperity 
depends happiness ; and so the improvement of material conditions will 
permit the country to become a happy place to live in, saner and sweeter 
than the city. The moral uplift will follow agricultural revival and 
educational reform, and through latter day developments — all along 
the line — is heard the Call of the Country. The old saw still holds 
true, that "'God made the country and man the town." The moral 
influence is not so good in a city as it is in the country. There are 
more chances to loaf on a street corner, more rubs against people of 
low ideals, more experience with cheating and dishonesty. All the 
world is getting money, money, and there is a certain sordid rush for a 
livelihood which is likelv to erase the finer, more natural things of 
life. The worker in the cotton mill, who has never known anything 
but a grinding struggle for a mere living, has no conception of the 
freedom of life in the open. Also their bodies and those of persons 
further up the social scale cannot be as healthy as the bodies of country 
people that spend their lives out of doors. Even the air is not fresh 
and pure down below the high city sky-scrapers. The necessity of 
children getting out of that compressed life into the bright country is 



24 The St. Maby's Muse. 

expressed in the funds raised in New York City to send fresh air 

children, as they are called, into the country homes of any one who 

will take them. I know of an old bachelor living on a farm who 

refreshes every year, during the summer months, from twenty to thirty 

of these children. Imagine a child wholly unacquainted with the sight 

of the stretch of green overland, the blue hills, the thick forest — he 

will have no conception of the grand expanse of nature and of his 

own smallness before nature's God. Suppose this child, a son of the 

great city, to have never heard the quiet sounds to be heard on a sunny 

meadow; the chirp of a cricket, the twitter of a bird, the whistle of 

some woodchuck, the sound of cattle moving slowly along and cropping 

the grass, the rustle of the wind, the chatter of the brook ; how can the 

meaning of these sounds be understood by one whose ear has been 

dulled by the noisy, crowded streets and the clatter of machinery ? He 

has never spent a spring in the country and watched the dormant seeds 

and buds burst into upspringing life. 

"So, priketh hem nature in hir corages: 
Than longen folk to goon on pilgrimages." 

What an inspiration to a dull mind to feel the uplift that comes from 
watching things grow! In the city all is artificial, fixed, man-made — 
the sidewalks, the skyscrapers, the glare of lights, even the trees and 
flowers set to grow just so, in an especial place. In the country, the 
cow paths and sheep tracks, winding around the hillsides and by the 
streams, changing with every season, are more graceful than the hard- 
est sidewalks ; from the top of nature's skyscrapers, the mountains and 
hills, we can see a sight more beautiful than the tops of myriads of 
business houses and tenements ; at night, after the sun is down, we 
can sit in the moonlight or look upon the twinkling stars without shad- 
ing our eyes from the blinding artificial light ; things are not forced 
to grow, they spring up everywhere. As a child I remember that 
the one thing which impressed me most about a plant was, that "it just 
came up" — was not planted by human hands, but "just came up." On 
the farm this child would learn the lesson that life is ever changing. 
He would see that the plant has changed since yesterday, that the 
water is always flowing by in the brook, that his pet lamb grew into 
a sheep. These things are and yet are not the same ; he must feel 
himself a part of the same great system. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 25 

The country is also a great teacher of honesty and of respect for the 
law and for others. One has to be fair with his crops — he can not 
cheat them. He has to give them good soil in a favorable place, proper 
treatment or they will not do well. He has to be kind to animals also, 
for they know who are their friends and even become vicious toward 
those who play tricks on them. Then, as I said before, a life in the 
country teaches respect for law and order. Mr. Bur bank says: "A 
fragrant beehive or a plump, healthy hornets' nest in good running 
order often becomes object lessons of some importance. The inhabi- 
tants can give the child pointed lessons in punctuation as well as cau- 
tion and some of the limitations as well as the grand possibilities of 
life; and by even a brief experience with a good patch of healthy 
nettles, the same lesson will be still further impressed upon him. And 
then by each new experience with homely natural objects, the child 
learns self-respect and also to respect the objects and forces which 
must be met." 

People may read and learn about plants and animals in books, but 
to live with them and see them grow is an entirely different thing. 
There is the same difference between a dictionary and a poem ; here we 
cram our heads with words, and there we experience the poetical reality 
of the order of things. A child raised in the country has less to learn 
about city life than a city child about country life. In Revelation we 
read about the Holy City as the ideal place in which to live, but there 
is a river running in the streets, with trees growing on its banks, and 
the children playing by the waterside. With a river and trees and 
public parks, a city is "taking on the atmosphere of the country — after 
all, the ideal place in which to live. 

This call of the country is beginning to be answered in the inspira- 
tion for new farming to be felt in the return of enthusiastic young men 
from the agricultural course to the old farm, which he revolutionizes 
according to his new ideas. We do not want the old serfdom as it 
existed in Europe ; but we want a rural population of intelligent people 
who own their land, love their work and labor freely and willingly, 
feeling some affection for the soil. With such inhabitants we would 
; no longer find gullies and ditches, worn by the rain, or weedy corners 
in our fields, or horses and cattle lean to the bone, or forests butchered 



26 The St. Mary's Muse. 



and hacked to destruction. The farmers would have more respect for 
the gifts of nature and would seek to increase the productiveness, effi- 
ciency and beauty of their farms. Fifty years from now the man 
who owns land will be the "man on horseback" and may ask tribute 
of all the world. He will learn to see prosperity in the soil, and with 
his mortgages paid off, the thrifty farmer will have cash in his pocket, 
an account at the bank and self-respect in his soul. He will realize 
that the best public benefactor is the man who makes two ears of corn 
grow where one grew before. I remember the passage in Amos, "Be- 
hold, the days come, saith the Lord, that the ploughman shall overtake 
the reaper, and the treader of grapes him that, soweth seed; and the 
mountains shall drop sweet wine, and all the hills shall melt. * * * 
They shall plant vineyards, and drink the wine thereof ; they shall also 
make gardens, and eat the fruit of them." With the coining genera- 
tion of those that shall occupy the land and love the soil, perhaps we 
shall find peace and rest from the driving, striving, nervous strain of 
American life. 

And to sum up, I may quote what our great private citizen, Theo- 
dore Roosevelt, has so well expressed: "I warn my countrymen that 
the great recent progress made in city life is not a full measure of our 
civilization ; for our civilization rests at bottom on the wholesomeness, 
the attractiveness, and the completeness, as well as the prosperity, of 
life in the country. The men and women on the farms stand for what 
is fundamentally best and most needed in our American life. Upon 
the development of country life rests ultimately our ability, by methods 
of farming requiring the highest intelligence, to continue to feed and 
clothe the hungry nations ; to supply the city with fresh blood, clean 
bodies, and clear brains that can endure the terrific strain of modern 
life ; we need the development of men in the open country, who will be 
in the future, as in the past, the stay and strength of the nation in 
time of war, and its grinding and controlling spirit in time of peace." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 27 



The Valedictory of 1910. 



Paula Elizabeth Hazard. 



Of all the days in our school life at St. Mary's this, for us, is the day 
of deepest gladness and deepest sadness — the day of mingled joy and 
sorrow. In the class history yesterday you learned something of the 
trials and struggles through which we have passed and the hard work 
which we have accomplished; but you have learned also of the joys 
and pleasures that have come to us. And on this our last day together 
at St. Mary's I hope and believe that in our hearts and minds the joys 
far outweigh the sorrows — the remembrance of examinations and tests 
is as nothing to the remembrance of the pleasures of well-merited suc- 
cess and of the many joys we have shared together. But that which 
lies nearest our hearts to-day is the thought of each dear spot at the 
school which we are so soon to leave, and the memory of the friends 
from whom we must part, perhaps forever. To each one of these 
friends, then, we would bid farewell. 

To the Trustees and patrons of the School, who have done so much 
to improve St. Mary's and to better the opportunities offered us here; 
to our Rector, who with courage and foresight has striven to do always 
what was truly for our interest; to our Lady Principal, who with un- 
failing gentleness and sympathy has helped us over many a hard place 
with kind and wise advice ; to the Secretary of the School whose busy 
days were never too full to help us in any possible way ; to our honorary 
member, the loyal friend and supporter of the class ; to Miss Katie, 
who has taught us to love more deeply the past of St. Mary's, her high 
ideals and her beloved founder ; to our Director of Music, who has done 
so much to raise the standard of the music department, and has in- 
stilled in our hearts a love and appreciation of music ; to the member 
of the Faculty to whom our Annual is dedicated, who has ever been 
"faithful in small and great" ; to these and to all others we say fare- 
well. !Nor do we forget the student body. To each pupil in the 
classes below us I would say — Love St. Mary's — if you do not already 
love her, come back next vear and learn to love her — for it is more 



28 The St. Mary's Muse. 



than worth all the trials and deprivations to stand where we are to-day 
with a deep devotion in your hearts for St. Mary's. 

And now to you, my classmates, who are nearest and dearest to me, 
I would speak a last word. For four years — four for most of us — 
we have worked and played together, and now we have reached the 
goal we have sought. But although this may be the end of our school 
life, it is merely the beginning of our after life — truly but the com- 
mencement of the deeper and fuller lives we are to lead. The time is 
very near when we shall look in one another's faces for the last time, 
and separating, shall go forth into the world, many of us never to meet 
again. I would leave with you this word: although success may not, 
and perhaps can not come to each one of us, remember that success is 
not the only thing worth seeking in life and that it is oftentimes failure, 
rather than success, that strengthens our characters — 

"What is our failure here but a triumphal evidence 
For the fullness of the days?" 

And to you especially would I say, Be loyal to St. Mary's wherever 
you may be. Upon the receiving of our diplomas she becomes our 
Alma Mater — you love her now I know, but let this not suffice — love 
and cherish her more and more as the years go by. She has truly 
"cared for her daughters full well" — she has given us lofty ideals by 
which to frame our characters and to guide our lives — hold these ideals 
ever clear before you and strive so to live after you leave St. Mary's 
that she may always feel proud of her daughters. And cling fast to 
the tender memories and associations which you carry away with you — 
all of them clustering around the dear little chapel — for in the years 
to come, when you realize, as you will, that St. Mary's is far dearer to 
you than you ever thought it could be, they will be precious to you — 
and through all our future life let us strive to be true to our motto, 
En avant, always remembering, however, that 

"The glory of our life below 
Comes not in what we do or what we know, 
But dwells forever in what we are." 






The St. Mart's Muse. 29 



PRE-COMMENCEMENT NEWS. 

April 29th— Song Recital by Miss Neil. 
In the Auditorium at 8 : 30. 

MISS LILLIE M. NEIL, Sopbano. 

Assisted by Miss Maejoby Shebwin, Violinist. 

Accompanists — Miss Beetha M. Luney., Mr. R. Blinn Owen. 

This was the program: 

I. Scene and Prayer (from Aida — "Bitorna Vinci tor") Yerdi 

II. (a) The Difficulty *Winter Watts 

( b ) "To the Hills" Bohemian 

(c) "My Love in Church"— Folk Songs. 

III. Carmen Fantasie Hubay 

Miss Shebwin. 

IV. (a) Obstination (A Besolve) Fontenailles 

( b ) J'ai Pleure en Reve Hue 

(c) Polly Willis Dr. Arne 

V. (a) Come to the Garden Salter 

( b ) Cuckoo Liza Lehman 

( c ) Spring Song Oscar Weil 

The News and Observer said: 

The brilliant recital given last evening at St. Mary's by Miss Lillie M. Neil was 
no surprise to her audience, but rather a fuller revelation of her powers. Miss 
Neil's singing was characterized by distinct individuality, by beauty of tone, by 
fine shading, and by dramatic force. The "Scene and Prayer" from "Aida" were 
nobly interpreted. The second number on the program was an interesting group 
which Miss Neil sang admirably. "The Difficulty," by Winter Watts, a young 
American composer, whose works are beginning to receive the recognition which they 
so well deserve; and two Bohemian folk songs arranged by Fr. Vrank in Krumlow, 
Bohemia, 1905, for Miss Marjory Sherwin. 

The group of French songs was exquisitely sung, as was also the ever dear "Polly 
Willis." 

Perhaps the favorite in the well-chosen program was "Cuckoo," by Liza Lehman, 
which brought out the clear and tender tones of the singer's voice. Miss Sherwin 
assisted Miss Neil with one selection, the "Carmen Fantasie" for violin, which she 
played with her usual brilliant technique and mastery of the instrument. The 
ent-ores were very happily chosen and were most popular. 

Miss Luney and Mr. Owen added greatly to the success of the recital by their 
sympathetic and artistic accompaniments. 

'Bohemian folk songs, arranged by Fr. Vrank, in Krumlow, Bohemia, 1905, for Miss Shenvin. 



30 The St. Maky's Muse. 

May 13th— Organ Recital. 
MISS ILA ADELE ROUNTREE (Candidate for Certificate). 

ASSISTED BY 

Miss Emilie Rose Knox, Violinist; Mr. Henry Grady Miller, Baritone. 

The Chapel, St. Mary's School, May 13, 1910, 8:30 o'clock. 

This was the program: 

Toccata and Fugue in D minor Bach 

Consolation and Spring Song Mendelssohn 

Miss Emilie Rose Knox. 
Hymn of the Nuns , Wely 

"One Sweetly Solemn Thought" Huhn 

Mr. Henry Grady Miller. 
Sortie in D minor Rogers 

Overture — "Midsummer Night's Dream" Mendelssohn 

Legende Bohm 

Miss Knox. 
Les Contemplations Ascher 

Lead Kindly Light Pinsuti 

Mr. Miller. 
Off ertoire Wely 

Said "M" in the News and Observer: 

The organ recital given last evening in the Chapel of St. Mary's School by Miss 
Ha Adele Rountree, a member of the Senior class, was greatly enjoyed by all who 
heard it. The program was varied and well arranged, and Miss Rountree's render- 
ing of it was a credit to her own musicianship and to the instruction of Miss Bertha 
M. Luney with whom she has been studying. 

Miss Rountree's pedaling is unusually good for so young an organist, and she plays 
with taste and with true appreciation of her instrument. She also proved herself a 
good accompanist for both violin and voice. 

Miss Rountree was assisted by Miss Emilie Rose Knox, violinist, and by Mr. 
Henry Grady Miller, baritone. Miss Knox is a young player of genuine talent and 
ability who never fails to delight her audience; while Mr. Miller's rich, sympathetic 
voice, which is becoming well known in Raleigh, was at its best in the two selections 
for last evening's program. 

May 14th — Song Recital by Pupils of Mr. Owen. 
In the Auditorium at 8:30. 

This was the program: 

"Good Night" , Densmore 

Miss Nannie Lee. 

"St. Paul" — Recitative and Duet Mendelssohn 

Mr. Paul Pittenger and Mr. Louie Hood. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 31 

"Henry VIII" — Music, "Orpheus' Lute" German 

Miss Susie Marshall, Mrs. McKimmon, Mrs. Ashe. 

"Faust" — Romance "Si le bonheur" Gounod 

Mr. Douglas Chandler. 

"Robin Hood" — Love Duet de Koven 

Mrs. Nannie Ashe and Mr. Paul Pittenger. 

"II Profeta" — Recitative and Aria Meyerbeer 

Mrs. Charles McKimmon. 

"Sing, Smile, Slumber" Gounod 

Mr. Louie L. Hood. 
Violin Obligato, Miss Fannie Hines Johnson. 

(a) "Rosamonde" — "Forth to the Meadows" Schubert 

(b) "Martha"— "May Gentle Sleep" Flowtow 

Mrs. Charles McKimmon and Mrs. Nannie Ashe. 
Mr. Paul Pittenger and Mr. Henry Grady Miller. 

The News and Observer said : 

The song recital at St. Mary's, given last evening by pupils of Mr. R. Blinn Owen, 
was a most interesting and successful musical event. 

The program opened with a Densmore selection, charmingly sung by Miss Nannie 
Lee, a member of the 1910 graduating class. The recitative and duet from "St. 
Paul," sung by two young students, Mr. Paul Pittenger and Mr. Louis Hood, was 
dignified, intelligent and well interpreted. 

"Orpheus' Lute," from the "Henry VIII" music, was delightfully given by Miss 
Marshall, Mrs. McKimmon and Mrs. Ashe. 

The "Faust" selection, Romance "Si le bonheur," was sung by Mr. Douglas Chand- 
ler with good style and beautiful voice. Mr. Chandler responded to an "encore" 
with an attractive "Lullaby" by Mr. R. Blinn Owen. The "duet" from "Robin 
Hood" was very effective — Mrs. Ashe's smooth, sweet soprano was at its best and 
Mr. Paul Pittenger's high notes were clear and resonant. 

Mrs. McKimmon gave a "recitative and aria," from "II Profeta," with scholarly 
and sympathetic interpretation ; the low tones of her rich contralto voice being 
exceptionally full and rounded. 

Gounod's beautiful and popular "Sing, Smile, Slumber," lost nothing in the inter- 
pretation by Mr. Louie Hood, whose flexible baritone is always a favorite. The 
violin obligato was charmingly played by Miss Fannie Hines Johnson. 

The program closed with "Forth to the Meadows" from "Rosamunde," sung with 
well blended voices and joyous spirit by Mrs. Charles McKimmon and Mrs. Nannie 
Ashe; Mr. Paul Pittenger and Mr. Henry Grady Miller. 

Third Orchestra Concert. 
On Saturday night, May 21st, the St. Mary's Orchestra of twenty- 
three members, assisted by Miss Marjory Sherwin, Violinist, Miss 
Fannie Hines Johnson, Violinist, and Miss Lillie M. Neil, Soprano. 



32 The St. Mary's Muse. 

and conducted by Mr. R. Blinn Owen, delighted a large audience in 
the Auditorium. 

The program, a popular one, follows : 

Symphony No. 40, G minor — Allegro Molto Mozart 

(a) "Ariosa" ,. .Fesca 

(b) "Marchenoper" — from "Hansel und Gretel" Humperdinck 

Miss Marjory Sherwin and Miss Fannie Hines Johnson. 

Selection from "II Trovatore" Verdi 

Overture — "The Calif of Bagdad" Boieldieu 

Waltz Song — "Se Saran Rose" Arditi 

Miss Lillie M. Neil. 
Overture — "Light Cavalry" Suppe 

These are the members of the Orchestra: 

First Violin. Second Violin. 

Mr. James Thomas, Concert Meister. Miss Margaret Erwin. 

Mr. Kimbrough Jones. Miss Sarah Barnwell. 
Miss Fannie Hines Johnson. Viola. 

Miss Mabel King. Mr. V. C. Royster. 
Miss Emilie Rose Knox Cornet. 

C e ll 0- Mr. W. D. Simpson. 

Miss Bertha Luney. Flute. 

D Mr. A. Barden. 

Bass. 

MR. B. J. Ray. Trombone. 

Mr. W. B. Wright. 

Clarmet. 0&oe _ 

Mr. Haywood Alderman. Mk _ Chas _ Barden 

Mr. C. B. Hart. pianQ 

Mr. R. H. Harrison. Miss Ella Dorr()h 

Bassoon. Miss Rebe Shields. 

Mr. C. N. Goodno. Miss m^y Shueord. 

French Horn. Drums. 

Mr. T. S. Linton. Mr. M. M. Levin. 



Senior Parties. 

The Seniors entertained by Miss Pickel, May 20, and by Miss Lee, 
May 23d. 

On the night of Friday, May 20th, the Senior class was entertained 
by a novel and delightful party, given by Virginia Pickel at her home 
on Morgan street. 

When the guests arrived they found that they were first expected to 
unravel a mazy, many-colored "cob-web," which ended in the discovery 



The St. Mary's Muse. 33 

of surprising little souvenirs appropriate and pretty. After this was 
over, all assembled on the porch, which was hung with colored lamps, 
and played "Old Maid." It was played as a progressive game, and 
the one who did not progress or who progressed least, was the ''old 
maid," and received the prize. This happy fate befell Alice Hines, 
who received ''Lavender and Old Lace" to console her. The refresh- 
ments were delightful and dainty, and all were unanimous in declaring 
that the whole evening had been a charming one. 

The series of Senior parties which were given during the year by 
different members of the class was brought to a close by a delightful 
reception given Monday afternoon, May 23d, by Xannie Lee, at her 
home on Wilmington street. 

These parties have become quite a feature of the life of the Seniors 
at St. Mary's, and this year, since the class has been an unusually large 
one, the social life has been very full, and will be long memorable to 
the members of the class. 



Alumnae Visitors. 

The gathering of the class of 1909 formed a notable group of visi- 
tors among the Alumnae guests. The five members who were present, 
Misses Georgia Hales, Minnie Leary, Eva Rogerson. with Miss Battle, 
of the faculty, made the reunion complete, with the exception of one 
member, Miss Frankie Self. 

Other visitors were Sunset Wood, Catherine Hawkins, Passie May 
Ottley, Mildred Borden, Rena Clark, Elizabeth Smith, Evelyn Weeks, 
Margaret Pennington, Annie Norfleet, Irene Smith, Mary Bourne, 
Jessie Harris. 

The parents and relatives of a good many of the graduates were 
present at Commencement this year. Mrs. Holloway, Mrs. Rountree, 
Mrs. Hines and her sister, Mrs. Shields and her sister, Miss Smith, 
Mr. and Mrs. Meares, Mr. and Mrs. Mardre being here from out of 
town. 



The St. Mary f s Muse. 



Subscription, One Year. = a = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = a = = = Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, In 
the Interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL. 



This much belated number of the Muse is issued now to greet the 
readers — students and teachers, new and old, alumnae and friends — at 
the opening of a new session. 

Its publication has been delayed largely on account of the press of 
other duties, and for the same reason it is issued now in rather frag- 
mentary form. But it carries a warm greeting from the School to all 
St. Maryites and friends of St. Mary's. 

With September we hope to take up the publication of the Muse more 
regularly and to have the paper appear regularly on the first of each 
month. The next (October) number will tell of the opening and may 
be expected by October 1st. The outlook for the new year is very good. 

Those interested will note the omission in this Muse of any extended 
Alumnae news, and the news of the students in the summer. These de- 
fects will be corrected in the next issue. This number only pretends to 
contain an introduction to the new teachers, and the belated account of 
Commencement and before, with the few notes that it has been possible 
to get together. 

The Muse Board for 1910-11 will be announced in the October 
number. E. C. 



How the Teachers Passed the Summer. 

Miss Thomas and Miss Fenner with their European party, which in- 
cluded Miss Kellogg, got off early in June and had a very pleasant trip 
abroad. An account of their journey over, in Miss Fenner's usual 



The St. Mary's Muse. 35 

graphic style, is given elsewhere in this Muse. They arrived back 
safely on August 21st, when Miss Fenner went to her home in Balti- 
more for the rest of the vacation and Miss Thomas spent a few days 
in New York before going to her relatives in South Carolina. 

"Miss Katie" was in Fayetteville in June and was not very well, but 
after getting better, went to Shelby Springs with her friend, Mrs. 
Kenan, for July and August and enjoyed herself greatly. Her other 
friends, Miss McVea, Miss Slater, and Mrs. Holmes, were staying at 
Grimshawe, not far from her. 

Miss Lee took the first trip away from home that she has had in 
several years when she spent August with her friend, Mrs. Fray, near 
Culpeper, Va. The rest of the summer she was at her home on 
Boy Ian Ave. Miss Sutton was busy at the School most of vacation, but 
was able to be with Mrs. Haughton in Pittsboro, her old home, for a 
week in July, and visited Miss Mary Manning, Miss Alice Edward 
Jones, and other friends, in Chapel Hill, the last two weeks in August. 

Miss Margaret Jones, after staying over in Raleigh for Gertrude Win- 
ston's wedding in June, went at once to ]STew York and took up her 
studies at the summer school of Columbia Universitv, where she will 
continue her work next winter. Her address is 647 Madison Ave., 
where she and her sister, Miss Mary Pride Jones, have an apartment. 

Miss Luney has not been very well during the summer, which she 
spent partly at her old home at North Petersburg, 1ST. Y., with her aunt, 
and partly with her friend, Mrs. Colgate, at Bennington, Vermont. 
She also visited Miss Sherwin in July at her home in Batavia, X. Y. 

Mr. Owen, shortly after the season closed, went to Bluefields, West 
Virginia, where he formerly taught, and conducted the Music Festival 
there very successfully. He came back to St. Mary's for the St. Mary's 
Conference, June 20-25, and left on the 28th for his home in Missoula, 
Montana, to spend the summer with his parents. He evidently carried 
very good reports with him, as he expects to bring two girls back to St. 
Mary's from Montana. During the great forest fires the last part of 
August, Missoula was in the center of the fire district, and the expe- 
riences of the people were remarkable. 



36 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Mr. Stone spent June and July traveling in the interest of the School. 
After visiting some of the points near Raleigh he was at St. Mary's for 
the week of the Conference, and then traveled by way of Greensboro, 
Salisbury and Charlotte, down into Georgia, where he visited Athens, 
Macon, Atlanta and Augusta, meeting many St. Mary's alumna3 and 
friends and winning new friends for the School. He came back by way 
of Camden and Wilmington, and went almost at once for a trip to Nor- 
folk and some of the east Carolina towns. The latter half of August 
he was in Greensboro, where Mrs. Stone and Florence spent the summer 
and the whole family returned to their home in Raleigh September 1st. 

Miss Dowd was all summer at her home in West Raleigh with her 
mother, and Miss Walton spent the summer quietly at her home in Mor- 
ganton. Miss Horsley was with her brother-in-law's family at Spar- 
row's Point, Md. Miss Hardesty spent July and August at her home 
in Morehead City. 

Mr. Cruikshank was at St. Mary's all the summer except the first 
half of August, when he made a brief trip to New York, Philadelphia, 
and Baltimore, and his relatives in Maryland. His sister, Miss Helen 
Cruikshank, of Baltimore, was with him at the School during July and 
August. 



With the Rector and His Family. 

The Rector and his family have been at the Rectory most of the sum- 
mer. In addition to being busy with the preparations for the St. Mary's 
Conference in the weeks immediately following the close of school, he 
found time to visit Beaufort and preach the annual sermon at the Com- 
mencement of St. Paul's School, Beaufort, and to attend the meetings 
of the Council of the District of Asheville, which met in Waynesville, 
and of the State Teachers' Association, which met in Asheville the sec- 
ond week in June. Mrs. Lay accompanied him to Beaufort. 

At the close of the Conference Mr. Lay went North for two weeks, 
first to attend the sessions of the National Educational Association in 
Boston, and then to meet prospective teachers in Boston and New York. 
He had time for a brief visit to his old home in Concord, N. H. 

In August he spent one Sunday in Oxford, preaching and visiting 
there, where he was the guest of Mrs. H. G. Cooper; and later he was 



The St. Mart's Muse. 37 

for a few days with Mr. Peter Hairston at Cooleemee Plantation. On 
this latter trip George accompanied him. 

George Balch Lay reached home from St. Paul's School, Concord, 
which he entered last Christmas, about the middle of June. He and his 
younger sisters and brother have been at home except for a visit of Eliza- 
beth, Ellen and ISTancy to the Camerons at Col. Bennehan Cameron's 
plantation, near Durham,- in August. 

Miss Grace Balch, Mrs. Lay's sister, has been a guest at the Rectory 
since the middle of August ; Mrs. Balch, her mother, went ISTorth early 
in June. 



NOTES. 

There have been very few changes made this summer, and St. Mary's 
will seem less changed this session when the old girls return than it has 
for some years. 

"Ravenscroft," Bishop Cheshire's home, has been closed most of the 
summer, Mrs. Cheshire being most of the time with her relatives in St. 
Mary's County, Maryland. Bishop Cheshire and his son, James, took 
a fishing trip in western jSTorth Carolina in late June and early July, 
and then, after spending some time with Mrs. Cheshire in Maryland, 
the Bishop had another good fishing party at Nag's Head. Miss Sarah 
has been visiting in Hillsboro and elsewhere. The house was re-opened 
the last week in August. 

The assignment of Ladies-in-charge this session will be as follows : 
Miss Thomas, in general charge ; Main Dormitories, Miss Sutton and 
Miss Buxton ; West Rock Dormitory, Miss McKimmon ; Senior Hall, 
Miss VanDyne ; East Rock, Miss Hill ; West Rock, Miss Horsley ; West 
Wing (2d), Miss Victor; West Wing (1st), Miss Battle; East Wing 
(2d), Miss Macauley; East Wing (1st), Miss Urquhart; Main (2d), 
Miss Wilson. 

In the competition for the Murchison and Smedes scholarships held 
last spring, May 20-21, first place was won by Miss Mary Butler, of 
Henderson, who received the Smedes Scholarship, and the Murchison 
went to Miss Myrtle Warren, of Greenville, 1ST. C. It was the best con- 
test that has yet been held for these scholarships. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS, 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ceuikshank - - - - Alumnse Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnse Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 
Honorary VirF-PRF=nnFNTs /Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 

HONORARY ViCE-FRESIDENTS j Mrg j McR p ittengeri R a l e igh. 

President - Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 

Secretary ... - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 
Treasurer - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 

Field Secretary - . - Miss Mary F. Henderson, Salisbury. 



EDITORIAL. 



Probably the most important single feature of the last Commence- 
ment was the meeting of the Alumnae, with the adoption of a constitu- 
tion for the Association, and other important business. It seems rather 
strange to issue this Muse without the news of that Alumnae meeting, but 
it is deemed best to do so, and we hope that the Alumna? will be in- 
dulgent. 

The special Alumnae Muse with the account of the Smedes Centennial 
Celebration, and an Alumnae Bulletin, with the Constitution and other 
important Alumnae matters, will be issued in September ; and the minor 
Alumnae news will be published in the October number. 

Meantime let the Alumnae look forward to the Founders' Day Meet- 
ings on All Saints Day and do what they can to make these meetings a 
greater success than ever before. 



Mrs. Iredell on Dr. Bennett Smedes. 

(A part of Mrs. Iredell's address to the Association at the 1910 Commencement.) 

The recent celebration of the Hundredth Anniversary of the birth of 
the Rev. Aldert Smedes, D.D., the Founder, and for thirty-five years 
the Rector of St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 1ST. C, was attended by many 
who came from far and near to show their love and loyalty to the man 
whose life and teaching had influenced their lives. But many who 
were present on that occasion had never known the Founder, and yet 



The St. Mary's Muse. 39 

had felt the influence of his work through the faithful example and 
teaching of his son and successor, the Rev. Bennett Smedes, who on his 
father's death nobly and loyally assumed his father's work, and carried 
it on until his own death in 1898. His feeling of responsibility in 
doing this was very great. He was doing his father's work and he felt 
himself responsible for the highest good of every individual girl left 
in his charge. With a manner so kind and gentle that the most timid 
girl did not hesitate to approach him, he was yet firm when firmness 
was needed, and, like his father, he expected and required faithfulness 
to duty from teachers and scholars. Yet the unfailing gentleness and 
courtesy which marked all his dealings with them, strengthened his 
influence in the forming of the manners and character of the girls of 
St. Mary's. 

Mr. Smedes had foreseen from the beginning of his Rectorate the 
increasing difficulties which would confront all private institutions of 
learning. Free schools not only in towns but in the rural districts, high 
schools, normal schools supported by State aid, one after the other soon 
began to threaten the life of St. Mary's as a private school. Then Dr. 
Bennett Smedes realized that in order to live as a Church School St. 
Mary's must become diocesan. An appeal was made to the Convention 
of the Diocese of North Carolina assembled in Charlotte in May, 1896. 
The plan was favorably considered, but not carried into effect until the 
Convention held in Raleigh in May, 1897. Later the Diocese of East 
and South Carolina and the Jurisdiction of Asheville assumed their 
responsibilities, and St. Mary's became the Church School of the Caro- 
linas. This was consummated during the lifetime of Dr. Bennett 
Smedes and he had the iov of realizing that his father's work would be 
perpetuated. ISTo thought of self had kept him from assuming it, nor 
from expending his entire patrimony in keeping it up. His faithful- 
ness and zeal were rewarded, and St. Mary's, his father's work and his 
own, lives to serve the Church in whose service it was founded, and may 
it long so live and send out many more faithful daughters imbued with 
the principles for which St, Mary's has always stood. M. I. 



40 The St. Maky's Muse. 

Miss Fenner Tells of the Trip Across the Atlantic. 

S. S. Duca di Genoa, June 16, 1910. 

Well, at last Miss Thomas and I with the eleven "babes" are on the 
briny deep. We left New York Saturday, June 11th, a sort of rainy 
day. Fathers and friends and relatives saw us off, with Esther Means, 
Margaret and Mary Pride Jones as especial St. Maryites. 

It was a little rough, so after our Italian lunch we all settled down in 
our steamer chairs. None of us were seasick except Miss Thomas and 
Ruth McEachern ; they have elected to avoid the dining room up to this 
day, which is the fifth out. We will pass the Azores this evening at 
seven, and Gibraltar in three and a half days, and as the trip has been 
so perfect, we will reach Naples on the 23d, Thursday, thus making the 
voyage in twelve days, which is very fine. 

We are a lazy set, doing nothing whatever to improve our minds. 
We see all the other tourists reading their Baedekers faithfully and fool- 
ing with time tables and looking more important than Moses, while we I 
eat, sleep, read ; eat, sleep ; and sleep some more ; occasionally arousing 
ourselves to investigate all the parts of the boat — steerage, second class, 
captain's bridge, fore and aft, engine room, etc. 

The girls are having a thrilling time with the Italian officers for "suit- 
ors," who are endeavoring to teach them the entire Italian language in 
twelve lessons. How well they are doing you can judge for yourself 
when I tell you this tale : Mary Hughes is captivated with a lovely baby 
in the steerage and she calls him endearingly, "Papoose, Papoose," 
thinking, no doubt, that she has struck the proper term for baby in 
Italian. They have also discovered a prince in disguise in the steerage, 
who seems to be studying biology. He, unlike us, is evidently trying to 
improve his mind. 

There are lots of interesting people on board, some musicians, a few 
artists, and plenty of just plain people, who are "folksey" and nice. 
We expect to meet them all in Europe, as we are all going to the Passion 
Play on July 17th. 

The boat itself is a perfect beauty, very steady, clean and new, and 
from the captain down every one is determined to make all hands happy. 
The Italian cooking startles one sometimes, but there are always enough 



The St. Mary's Muse. 41 

things that resemble American food to make a "hefty" meal on. The 
long sticks of bread (here follows one of Miss F.'s inimitable '"graph- 
ics"), about a yard long, with neither sugar nor salt in it, we eat and 
eat ; it is so safe ! Xow, the innocent-looking toast is to be avoided, as 
it is sweet with anise seed in it and is flavored with German cologne. 
We eat oysters in the half-shell, called "ostriche," after the noble bird. 
I couldn't begin to mention all of the curious things, but after all we 
are enjoying the novelty of it all. Wine is provided freely and for the 
dinner the very best is served, but the "babes" prefer lemonade, so our 
obliging waiter keeps us supplied with cut lemon and pickles! We are 
a walking advertisement for Heinz and the 57 varieties, much to the 
amusement of our friends and the waiter. Don't imagine that I am 
criticising the food ; no one is more eager for the five meals a day than 
our party. We can arouse from our deepest slumbers at the slightest 
tap of the bell and are the first in the dining room at all hours. 

Well, we are a happy lot, and each separate individual is enjoying 
herself. "C. F." at last can be that much sought for thing — a ermit. 
Great joy ! I "act pleasant" for a few brief moments, then return to a 
secluded nook and rest and rest and rest. (Here another drawing of 
C. F. at rest!). Would that you all were with me to do likewise. 

I may write you a letter during the summer, if you would like to 
hear more of us. We are happy now but doing nothing madly exciting ; 
but in Europe, who knows, I may have wild and woolly adventures to 
relate about the doings of "the babes" ! 

Sincerely, C. Fe^nek. 



St. Mary's Weddings. 



AtKinson-Foster. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Foster 

request your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Katherine Russell 

to 

Mr. John Franklin Atkinson 



42 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Saturday afternoon, June the fourth 

nineteen hundred and ten 

at five o'clock 

St. John's Church 

Savannah, Georgia 

At home after June tenth 

Navy Yard, Pensaeola, Fla. 

Mart-Barbee. 

Mr. and Mrs. Claude B. Barbee 

request the honour of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Katie Wayland 

to 

Mr. R. Mabrey Hart, 

on the morning of Wednesday the eighth of June 

at half after ten o'clock 

Edenton Street Methodist Church 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Hood-Gregory. 

Mrs. Cora Hite Gregory 

invites you to be present 

at the Methodist Episcopal Church 

Henderson, North Carolina 

on Wednesday evening, June the twenty-second 

nineteen hundred and ten 

at nine o'clock 

to witness the marriage of her daughter 

Corinne 

to 

Mr. Robert Horace Hood 

Ogier-Temple. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Oscar Temple 

announce the marriage of their daughter 

Margaret 

to 



The St. Mary's Muse. 4 



q 



Mr. George Kufus Ogier 
on Wednesday, June the twenty-second 
nineteen hundred and ten 
Denver, Colorado 
At Home 
after September the first 
Ellington Apartments 
Denver, Colorado 

DecKer-Neil. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel jSTeil 

announce the marriage of their daughter 

Lillie Mary 

to 

Mr. William Thornton Decker 

on Wednesday evening, June the twenty-second 

nineteen hundred and ten 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Pridgen-Rountree. 

Mr. and Mrs. David Rountree 

announce the marriage of their daughter 

Ha Adele 

to 

Dr. Claude Leonard Pridgen 

Thursday, July the twenty-eighth 

nineteen hundred and ten 

New Bern, North Carolina 



REfJD !-MflRK !-PCT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The MUSE, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



' It's worth the difference " 



WHARTON & TYREE 



Workers in Artistic Photography" 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL CO. 



Dry Goods 

OE AL,L KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES SEE SLIPPERS 




Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVII/LE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

THIRD GENERATION OF SUCCESSFUL 
BANKING. 

All patrons treated with every courtesy. 
New accounts solicited. Safe Deposit Boxes 
for rent. Fire and Burglar Proof Vault. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 
F. H. Briggs, Cashier. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

Jolly &• Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 




St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 

ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 

Hunter Bros. & Brewer Company 

Dry Goods, Notions and Shoes 

210 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 



St. Mary's Seal Stationery, 
St. Mary's Seal Pins, 
St. Mary's Pennants, 
St. Mary's Calendars, 
May be had by writing to The Muse. 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 


HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 


Dr. L. D. CASTLEBURY 

Dentist 


WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 


AYCOCK & WINSTON 

Attorneys at Law 

raleigh, n. c. 


JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE." 


ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 


De. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
Millinery. 


GRIMES & VASS, Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance and Investments. 


J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
222 Fayetteville Street. 



Advertisements. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU 

RALEIGH, 1ST. C. 

Invites correspondence with teachers open to en- 
gagement and with school officers seeking com- 
petent teachers. NO CHARGE TO SCHOOL 
OFFICERS. Full particulars free. 

CHAS. J. PARKER, Manager 


/mfEDw^D§^m 

ffl& BFOJGHTQN^J 
rf/PRIKrLNG COAl) 

1 /l^fO-ElGH.Ai^. 1/ 


MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 
OP RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital $100,000.00 4 per cent paid in Savings 

Department 
E. C. Duncan, Pres. W. B. Drake, Jr., Cash. 


WANTFH J Every Girl at st - Mar y' s to 

VlnlilLUi come down every day in the 
week to TEMPLE PHARMACY and get 
a SHERRY ICE CREAM. 


A. H. FETTING 

Manufacturer of Greek Letter Fraternity 
Jewelry, 213 N. Liberty St., Baltimore, Md. 


HIRSHBERG ART COMPANY 

Art and Drawing Supplies, Frames, Prints, etc. 

418 N. Howard St., Baltimore, Md. 


Factory: 213 Little Sharp St. 

4Sf Memorandum package sent to any fraternity 
member through the Secretary of Chapter. Special 
designs and estimates furnished on class pins, rings, 
medals for athletic meets, etc. 


The Yarborough House 

invites your patronage 



The School authorities will be glad to mail on request the current St. 
Mary's Bulletins, with full information about the School. 

Bulletin 18, General Information (Catalogue). July, 1910. 

Bulletin 15, Academic Courses and Announcements. October, 1909. 

Bulletin 16, Scholarships. March, 1910. 

Bulletin 7, Historical Sketch. 

Bulletin 17, Alumnse Records. May, 1910. 



KING'S GROCERY, 

"The Little Store." 


SEND TO 

Plummer's Stables 

For Riding and Driving Horses 


E. M. UZZELL & CO., 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers Steam and Gas Fitters. 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 


121 Fayetteville Street. 


CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 
Fayetteville Street. 


RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. Pullen, 

Pres., Chas. Root, Cash'r. Capital and Surplus 
875,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO 

The WELL-KNOWN WASHINGTON MANUFACTURING 

JEWELER AND SILVERSMITH, WILL 

MOVE INTO HIS NEW BUILDING, 926 F ST., N. W. 

ABOUT MARCH TWENTY-FIRST 

INSURE IN THE 

Jefferson Standard Life Ins. Go. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Strongest in the South 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of Morth Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY. 

ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW 

Ladies' Furnishings and Novelties. 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy— China. 

Pictures. Stationery. Toys. 



Have you subscribed to The Muse ? 
DO IT NOW. 



CALL 

FREEMAN'S STABLES 

When You Want a Good Saddle 
Horse, or a Good Horse and Buggy 

Both Phones 


J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 
Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE CO. 

51 and 53 Franklin Street 

CHICAGO 

Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 


AUDI ulMPuON PRESCRIPTIONIST 


Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 

Dentist. 


4ood things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 


H. T. HICKS CO. 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



POOL & CROCKER 

up-to-date 
FOOTWEAR 

Special Attention to Fit 

105 Fayetteville St. 



KIN G-CRO WELL'S DRUG STORE 



AND SODA FOUNTAIN 



Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, H. W. JACKSON, 

President. Treasurer. 

G. H. DORTCH, Secretary. 



Sample copies of the Muse will be mailed 
to Alumnse at any time on request. 



Dr. L. J. PEGRAM 

DENTIST 

Office 209% Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. C. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
College Postals 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 



M. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 



GROCERS 



WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS KEADY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGH1 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEIN METZ, 

FLORIST. 

,oses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 
Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
;aleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113. 



T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 
Repairing promptly done. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 



Eat Betts' Ice Cream 



NORFOLK -SO UTH ERN RAILWAY 

few Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

Express train service between Raleigh, Wilson, Greenville, Goldsboro, Kinston, 

New Bern, Morehead City, Washington, Plymouth, Elizabeth City, 

Virginia Beach and Norfolk, Virginia. 



VIA NORFOLK TO NORTH AND EAST 
VIA RALEIGH TO SOUTH AND WEST 

6 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women). 

69th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 15, 1910. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 19, 1911. 



St. Mary's 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 
8. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



offers instruction in these 

Departments: J £ THE ART SCHOOL 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1909-10 were enrolled 250 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty -eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-two 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector. 

Saint Mary's School library 






©ctober, 1010 




IRaletgb, t\. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



OPENING NUMBER. 



7o~l. XV. October, 1910. No. 2. 



O God, Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the faithful, visit, we pray Thee, this School 
rith thy love and favor; enlighten our minds more and more with the light of the 
verlasting Gospel; graft in our hearts a love of the truth; increase in us true 
eligion; nourish us with all goodness; and of Thy great mercy keep us in the 
ame, blessed Spirit, whom, with the Father and the Son, together, we worship 
,nd glorify as one God, world without end. Amen. 



SIXTY-NINTH OPENING. 

The Sixty-ninth Session of the School began on Thursday, the fif- 
eenth of September, with the largest enrollment of pupils in its his- 
orv. 

The Dew teachers arrived on the Saturday previous and the old ones 
■n Monday, so that there was a full attendance at the opening faculty 
neeting on Monday night. 

The new girls began arriving some as early as Monday, with the 
isual complement of fond mothers and fathers, and the work of classi- 
ication went merrily (?) forward on Tuesday and Wednesday. By 
Wednesday night nearly all the tables in the dining room were 
led. 

The opening service at nine o'clock on Thursday was short but 
learty, with the Bishop of North Carolina, the Rector of the School, 
nd the local clergy in the chancel. A few words of welcome and en- 
ouragement were spoken by Bishop Cheshire, calling attention to the 
act that it is natural for the young to sing and rejoice and that he 
toped they would thoroughly enjoy their life at St. Mary's, the sweet 
ervices in the chapel, the studies, the recreation and the school life in 
general. 

Soon after the chapel service was over, the teachers met the various 
lasses in the class rooms, books were given out, lessons were assigned, 
nd on Friday morning the regular work of the school year began. 






46 The St. Mary's Muse. 

WITH THE GIRLS OF 1910-1911. 

The list of the St. Mary's girls of any year as published in the 
Muse each September is always a matter of much interest to the 
friends of St. Mary's, and it is especially gratifying this year to note 
more names in the list than, so far as the records show, have ever been; 
at this period in the year before. While St. Mary's is the largest, 
educational institution of the Episcopal Church for girls and young 
women in the country, our numbers have run heretofore with about 135j 
as a maximum, while this year there are 150 girls present as boarders, 
and others are expected. 

The senior class is not so large as the one of 1910 with its 18 grad 
uates, but the six seniors hope to uphold the dignity of seniordom 
For the first time in years the majority of the class are local pupils — 
namely, Ina Jones, Rebecca Merritt, Lula Parker and Josephine Ton 
noffski ; the two boarding seniors are Nell Lewis and Isabel Perry. 

The girls as a rule are somewhat older than for several years past; 
and they are divided about as usual as regards home location anc 
church membership. Approximately 24 per cent are non-Episcopal 
lians. There are more girls from the Southern States than we hav< 
had for several years, and East Carolina is again represented, whil*| 
Asheville this year shows a falling off. 

It is a pleasure to welcome back some of the girls who have to trav 
farthest to reach St. Mary's. Mary Owen is back from Guatemal 
and Helen Scobell from Mexico, Millian Green from Denver, anc 
Beatrice Barton from Connecticut. Vying with them in distanc 
from home are the "Montana girls," who came back with Mr. Owen-^ 
Zona Shull and Eredericka Gilbert, and Helen Scobell's frienc 
Yvonne Baber of Chihuahua. 

Naturally some of the conspicuous figures of recent years are mis 
ing. Rebecca Wood and Elizabeth Leary hold up the honors of Eder 
ton, while the Rogersons and Annie Wood enjoy the pleasure o| 
grown-up-dom, and of course long for St. Mary's. Mary Shufor 1 } * 
sends good wishes from Hickory, but Hickory is not represented b 
the girls of 1910. Charlotte, Wilmington, Henderson, Fayettevill 
and Elizabeth City continue to be well represented. 



:; 



The St. Mary's Muse. 47 



There seem to be no aspirants for the place of the Hazards in 
cholarship, though several of the new girls have very promising rec- 
ords. Mary Butler of Henderson, who won the Smedes Scholarship 
with high honor seems to bid fair to increase her honors at St. Mary's 
and Patsey Smith, who won the honors at the Kaleigh High School 
last year, has the distinction of being the first girl admitted without 
conditions to the junior class, having stood the full examinations dur- 
ing the summer. 

Naturally there are a number of names among the new girls familiar 
:o those who have known St. Mary's girls of recent years. Amelia 
Clarkson is a sister of Miss Emilie who was here in 1905 ; Julia and 
Sophronia Cooper are younger sisters of Miss Mary, who was here in 
1905 and then went to Converse, and is assistant in art at Converse 
:his year ; Virginia Divine's older sister Miss Augusta was here in 
1905 ; Beverly DuBose comes at once into a host of friends from her 
Relationship to her sister Janie. Beulah Grubb is the sister of Edna ; 
ftlarion Haigh is a sister of Miss Lillian, who was a great favorite. 
Laura Margaret Hoppe is a niece of Miss Isabel Brumby, of the 
plass of 1904. Frances Kyle is a younger sister of Miss Jennie ; 
Katharine Lassiter's older sister, Miss Mary, graduated in 1906. 
Nannie Shields is warmly received through the high regard felt for 
Rebe, who by the way is now teaching in Scotland Neck ; Elise Smith 
s a sister of Miss Mildred, who was here in 1905. The Webb girls 
ire following in the footsteps of their mother, who was a St. Mary's 
£irl ; and Mary Wilson comes largely through the influence of her sis- 
er, Margaret. 

The full list of the boarders of 1910-1911 is as follows: 

lelen Frances Archey Concord, N. C. 

Jessie Wilson Arthur Harrisonburg, Va. 

Tvonne Marie Baber Chihuahua, Mex. 

largaret Taylor Barber North Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Elizabeth Barnwell Stateburg, S. C. 

Jeatrice Barton Farmington, Conn. 

lobah Kerner Bencini High Point, N. C. 

largaret Brent Blackmer Salisbury, N. C. 

ulia Borden Goldsboro, N. C. 

]mma Beltis Bouknight Johnston, N. C. 

Idith Bradshaw High Point, N. C. 



48 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Lucile Chandler Brady Henderson, N. C. 

Katherine Blount Bragaw Washington, N. C. 

Ruth Louise Branhani Tampa, Fla. 

Margaret Strange Broadfoot Fayetteville, N. C. 

Hilda Blanche Broadwood Mobile, Ala. 

Dorothy Valentine Brown Rutherford, N. J. 

Margaret Brown Canton, Ga. 

Katharine Marsden Bruce Portsmouth, Va. 

Ada Aydlett Burfoot Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Mary Brown Butler Henderson, N. C. 

Amelia Garden Clarkson Wateree, S. C. 

Julia Horner Cooper Oxford, N. C. 

Mary Hazel Cooper Earnest, N. C. 

Sophronia Moore Cooper Oxford, N. C. 

Ruth Reynolds Critz Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Anna Baskerville Cuthbert Petersburg, Va. 

Eleanor Florence Davis Henderson, N. C. 

Elvira Belle Davis Henderson, N. C 

Virginia Stella Divine Rocky Mount, N. C 

Ella Dorroh Greenville, S. CJ 

Beverly DuBose Columbia, S. C. 

Anna Margaret Edens Clio, S. C. 

Margaret Emery Charlotte, N. C. 

Bessie Smedes Erwin West Durham, N. C. 

Margaret Locke Erwin West Durham, N. C. 

Katie Attmore Ferebee Aurora, N. C. 

Annie Brumby Field Marietta, Ga, 

Frances Elizabeth Fitehett Cape Charles, Va 

Mary Grist Fowle Washington, N. C 

Beatrice Fuller Portland, N. Y 

Mary Skinner Gaither Hertford, N. C 

Annie Ruth Gary Henderson, N. C 

Nina Farrow Gibbs Oriental, N. C 

Frederika Mary Gilbert Lolo, Mont 

Millian Cooke Green Denver, Col 

Laura Washington Griffith Charlotte, N. C 

Beulah Grubb Linwood, N. C 

Edna Grubb Linwood, N. C 

Marion Taylor Haigh Fayetteville, N. C 

Jennie Dick Harris Atlanta, Ga 

Martha Timberlake Harris Franklinton, N. C 

Olive Harris Reidsville, N. C 

Lucy Garrett Harrison Enfield, N. C 

Agnes Tinsley Harrison Atlanta, Ga 

Catherine London Hawkins Jacksonville, Fla 

Elizabeth Byrd Henderson Asheville, N. C 

Nellie Hendricks Marshall, N. C 



The St. Maky's Muse. 49 

Leone Kathleen Herbert Morehead City, N. C. 

Sara Kirk Heyward Beaufort, S. C. 

Mary Frances Hodgson Jacksonville, Fla. 

Laura Margaret Hoppe Marietta, Ga. 

Elizabeth Hughes Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Virginia Frances Huttenhauer Southern Pines, N. C. 

Helen Jackson Petersburg, Va. 

Jennie Brodie Jackson Warrenton, N. C. 

Caroline Clarke Jones Charlotte, N. C. 

Hortense Haughton Jones Asheville, N. C. 

Nannie Louise Josey Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Frances Kyle Decatur, Ala. 

Kathryn Blount Lassiter Hertford, N. C. 

Effie Shepherd Leak Wadesboro, N. C. 

Elizabeth Woodard Leary Edenton, N. C. 

Nell Battle Lewis Raleigh, N. C. 

Frances Hinsdale Lilly Fayetteville, N. C. 

Muriel Elizabeth Linthicum Atlanta, Ga. 

Elise Randolph Lloyd Durham, N. C. 

Caroline Ashe Lockhart Wadesboro, N. C. 

Mary Louise Manning Durham, N. C. 

Emily Marriott Battleboro, N. C. 

Evelyn Cameron Maxwell Pensacola, Fla. 

Jane Iredell Meares Wilmington, N. C. 

Meta Mewborn Kinston, N. C. 

Fannie Butler Miller '. Trenton, S. C. 

Mary Gibbs Mitchell Greenville, S. C. 

Elizabeth Morris Bellefonte, Pa. 

Helen Elizabeth McArthur Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Gertrude Elizabeth McComb Jacksonville, Fla. 

Melba McCullers Clayton, N. C. 

Anne Ludlow McGehee Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Mary Polk McGehee Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Susie Mclver Cheraw, S. C. 

Fannie Old McMullan Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Margaret Swift Northen Atlanta, Ga. 

Florie Wright Northrop Wilmington, N. C. 

Kate Cumming Northrop Wilmington, N. C. 

Mary Hancock Owen Guatemala, C. A. 

Kathryn deRosset Parker Princeton, N. J. 

Carrie Burrus Peabody Atlanta, Ga. 

Bessie Fitzhugh Peace Watha, N. C. 

Katherine Marriott Pender Tarboro, N. C. 

Isabelle Hester Perry Henderson, N. C. 

Virginia Selden Prettyman Summerville, S. C. 

Lois Pugh Savannah, Ga. 

Margaret Quince Wilmington, N. C. 



50 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Susan Porter Rawlings Wilson, N. C. 

Agnes Reese Savannah, Ga. 

Virginia Reynolds Sumter, S. C. 

Helen Virgilia Robinson Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Joanna Elizabeth Rogers Jacksonville, Fla. 

Helen Isabell Scobell Chihuahua, Mex. 

Anne Dupree Shields Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Zona May Shull Missoula, Mont. 

Janie Ruffin Sims Maxwelton, Va. 

Katherine Sanderson Small Washington, N. C. 

Elizabeth Maund Smith Wilmington, N. C. 

Josephine Valentine Smith Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Kate Watson Smith Selma, Ala. 

Katherine Dilworth Smith Birmingham, Ala. 

Olive Ernestine Smith Washington, D. C. 

Patsey Harry Smith Raleigh, N. C. 

Anna Cowan Strong Raleigh, N. C. 

Pleasant Stovall Savannah, Ga. 

Amelia Pinckney Sturgeon Cary, N. C. 

Elizabeth Anderson Tarry . Woodworth, N. C. 

Nannie Davis Taylor Beaufort, N. C. 

Marie Jacquelin Thomas Charlotte, N. C. 

Catherine Blakeslee Turner Monteagle, Tenn. 

Mary Glenn Tyson Carthage, N. C. 

Jessica Vann Wilmington, N. C. 

Eva Baker Vaughan South Boston, Va. 

Myrtle Warren Greenville, N. C. 

Adriana Webb Houston, Va. 

Ovid Webb Houston, Va. i 

Ruth Morrill Wells Columbia, S. C. 

Irving Gaillard Westervelt Greenville, S. C. 

Bessie White Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Elinor Fornis Williams Fort Screven, Ga. 

Julia Williams Ringwood, N. C. 

Willie Simpson Williams Ringwood, N. C. 

Ethel Blount Williamson Graham, N. C. 

Mary Blackburn Wilson Rock Hill, S. C. 

Bessie Blount Winslow Hertford, N. C. 

Amabel Conyers Winston Raleigh, N. C 

Edna Louise Wood Charleston, S. C. 

Rebecca Bennehan Wood Edenton, N. C. 

Jennie Woodruff Summerville, S. C. 

Carol Woodson Birmingham, Ala. 

Helen Cherry Wright Wilmington, N. Cs| 

Martha Bowden Wright Wilmington, N. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



51 



The Day pupils include the following: 



Martha Bailey. 
Adelyn Barbee. 
Elizabeth Cherry. 
Grace Crews. 
Elizabeth Dortch. 
Lucy Dortch. 
Sarah Fenner. 
Elizabeth Johnson. 
Estelle Hawkins. 
Ina Jones. 
Sue Kitchin. 
Elizabeth Lay. 
Margaret Leard. 
Lizzie Lee. 
Ruth Lee. 



Academic Department. 

Eleanor Mann. 
Rebecca Merritt. 
Flora McDonald. 
Lula Parker. 
Margaret Rogers. 
Henrietta Schwartz. 
Kate Silver. 
Effie Smith. 
Florence Stone. 
Anna Strong. 
Frances Strong. 
Elizabeth Thompson. 
Josephine Tonnoffski. 
Mary John Wood. 



Intermediate Department. 

Ellen Lay. 
Elizabeth Telfair. 
Josephine Williford. 
Belle Cameron. 



Bessie Folk. 
Alice Giersch. 
Katherine Hughes. 
Mary Elizabeth Hughes. 

Primary Department. 

Mary Hoke. 
Lucy Lay. 
Nancy Lay. 
Virginia Royster. 
Mildred Williford 
Lillias Shepherd. 

Business Department. 

Roberta Pratt 



Windham Ashe. 
Elizabeth Baker. 
Katherine Baker. 
Elizabeth Cross. 
Florence Harrison. 
Randolph Hill. 



Marjory Terrell. 
Louise Sanders. 

Special Students 
Martha Allen. 
Mrs. T. M. Ashe. 
Addie Bagwell. 
Marion Baker. 
Mrs. Bessie Bass. 
Louise Bernard. 
Eunice Bowen. 
Isabelle Bowen. 
Sophie Busbee. 
Mary Cain. 

Mary Mitchell Chamberlain. 
Julia Coke. 



in Music and Art. 

Jessie Eason. 
Blanche Gregory. 
Emilie Rose Knox 
Nannie Lee. 

Mr. C. T. McClenaghan. 
Anne McKimmon. 
Mr. H. G. Miller. 
Marion Pickel. 
Frances Park. 
Mr. P. M. Pittenger. 
Bettie Russ. 
Mildred Yates. 



52 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Two Days in Oberammergau. 

Though our party of fifteen secured only three seats, we enjoyed 
even the three hours' trip from Munich to Oberammergau. We took 
turns using the three places. To two fortunate ones, a courteous gen- 
tleman gave his large "box" as a seat, and those two are convinced that 
the gentleman was the King of Belgium, for he looked exactly like 
the pictures of His Highness. Others thought that another man who 
was similarly kind, was the King of Saxony, but they found that 
they were mistaken when on the next day the real king was pointed 
out to them. As kings, however, were not everywhere, I'm afraid 
that some of the party, when too tired to stand longer, sat on the plat- 
form floors, yet — as was our habit throughout Europe — we sought at I 
every station strengthening and refreshment in the form of Cailler's 
milk chocolate and strangely made cakes. 

We had hardly seen the Kofel rising high above a little village and 
bearing on its summit the cross shining bright in the afternoon sun- 
shine, when we reached the village and our Oberammergau experience 
began. We went directly to Number 37, the house of Martin Hoch- 
enleitner, "Simon the Canaanite" of the Passion Play. The houses 
in Oberammergau are numbered as if they formed one long street, 
and when you buy a Passion Play ticket you are assigned a number 
designating the house in which you are to stay. Our house was built 
-of timber and plaster and had two entrance doors, one small one lead- 
ing to the house proper and beside it a large one opening into the 
barn and stable, for Mary Hughes and Annie Tait Morgan had a 
room over the barn. All the rooms were spotlessly clean and altogether 
comfortable, the noticeable furnishings being pictures of religious sub- 
jects and the usual German feather bed comforters. We found that 
we were to take our meals at the house of Nicodemus, and good meals 
they were, too. After the first one — dinner — we walked down into 
the village to join the hundreds of Americans there, and to meet hotel 
and boat acquaintances. Of course, we bought post cards in the house 
of Anton Lang and other souvenirs, each after her fancy. Miss Fen- 
ner and Miss Kellogg could not resist carved wood crucifixes, but Jo- 
anna Rogers was not at all surprised to know that I had gotten the 
very little stein I needed to perfect my happiness. Rebecca and An- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 53 

nie Wood, Mary Shuford, Eloise Robinson and Joanna all got beau- 
tifully illustrated books telling of the Passion Play. 

We got up early tbe next morning and were in our places in the 
Passion Theatre when at eight o'clock the boom of the cannon an- 
nounced the opening of the great drama. No presentation of later 
events was more impressive than the first of the Passion Week scenes — 
the triumphal entry into Jerusalem. Preceding the Christus riding 
on an ass, there crowded through the streets five hundred men, women 
and children, waving their branches of palm and singing songs of glad- 
ness. And such a natural concourse it seemed. One dear little 
golden-haired boy did look so very frightened and bewildered until he 
had safely climbed the steps of the house of Annas and felt himself 
hidden behind the balcony railing. Hardly had the hosannas to the 
Christus died away when the priests and the angered money changers 
| of the Temple began their work, and turned the people against Him 
they had but now adored. The parting of the Christus from his 
mother was not sadder or the trial before Pilate more dramatic than 
this scene picturing the brief triumph, followed so soon by desertion 
and impressing the thought that thereafter the Man of Sorrows stood 
alone amidst the multitude. 

Prologue, chorus, tableau from Old Testament history, and scene 
from the week of passion followed one another in steady succession 
until at eleven forty-five the First Part ended with the betrayal in 
the Garden of Gethsemane. 

An hour and a half later, we were once more ready in the theatre. 
'Very soon a storm blew up and the rain poured for a time, but, chorus 
and actors on the uncovered stage performed their parts apparently 
undisturbed. We were pleased that Annas and Caiaphas had a good 
[wetting. Yet Annas (Sebastian Lang, a beadle) is a remarkable ac- 
tor ; he seems the incarnation of a fanaticism and hatred made strong 
by power and a venerated old age. After the scenes in which we 
learn that Judas has found to his horror that his treacherous kiss por- 
tended death to his master, comes one of the powerful scenes of the 
play — the Despair of Judas. The barren potter's field to be bought 
later with the price of blood is the place where the conscience-stricken 
betrayer seeks death, one blasted tree suggesting to him the manner 



54 The St. Mary's Muse. 

in which he might end his hated life. And the despair of this 
Judas is so real that the scene needed not the actual lightning and 
thunder which accompanied our view of it to inspire the beholders 
with fear and awe, "to purge their minds with pity and terror." 

Anton Lang is at his best in the last scenes of the drama ; earlier 
he is too submissive, but here he acts well his part, bidding his mother 
and the Raphael-faced John good-bye with a very human sympathy 
for them in their distress, and pardoning the repentant thief in tones 
of authority. 

When at about six the chorus sang the final Hallelujah in praise 
of the Victor, whose ascension was represented in the last tableau, we 
were surprised to find that the eight hours of strained attention had 
not tired us. We set off at once to climb up the side of the Kofel 
to the great stone crucifix erected by Ludwig of Bavaria. That ac- 
complished, we sought the village church, finding in the crowded 
churchyard the tombs of many Mayers, Langs, and members of other 
families well known as furnishing actors in the great play. After 
supper, Maria, the fifteen-year-old daughter of our host, and herself a 
singer in the chorus, led us to hear the village band. Our little guide 
was so bright and interesting and so glad of every opportunity of using 
the English taught her by a girl friend that we paid far more atten- 
tion to her than to the music. 

Early Monday morning, we took the train for Munich, and regret- 
fully left the kindly people and their dear quiet little town, for even 
four thousand visitors can not take from Oberammergau its simplicity 
and "old worldliness." T. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 55 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



Elizabeth Hughes and Caroline Jones, Editors. 



The First Faculty Recital. 

The first faculty recital of the season was given on Monday even- 
ing, September 26th, in the Auditorium, by Miss Wilson, assisted by 
Miss Sherwin. 

We quote the following from the News and Observer: 

The song recital last evening by Miss F. Zulette Wilson was a brilliant beginning 
to the series of concerts to be given by the Music Faculty of St. Mary's during the 
season of 1910-1911. 

Miss Wilson's voice is a dramatic soprano of strong, rich quality and wide register, 
the very low notes and the notes of the upper register being particularly good. Her 
singing was marked by color and enthusiasm, her interpretations being strongly 
individual, never, however, sacrificing the composer's thought and intention. This 
was Miss Wilson's first appearance in Raleigh, and the attitude of the audience was 
naturally more or less critical, but it warmed quickly under the magnetism of her 
voice and personality, and by the third number it was wholly enthusiastic. 

Miss Sherwin was greeted, as usual, with a storm of applause, the never-failing 
due of her brilliant technique and sympathetic interpretation. The Wieniawski 
''Romance" was very beautiful and Miss Sherwin's magic bow seemed to unfold a 
new wealth of charm in the "Hungarian Gypsy Dance," which was played by request. 

Miss Luney and Mr. Owen as accompanists added greatly to the artistic effect of 
the numbers. 

The programme is given below: 

programme. 

I. Don Fatale ( Don Carlos ) Verdi 

II. (a) Du bist wie eine Blume Chadioich 

(6) Toujours Berroit 

( c ) Ich liebe dich Grieg 

[II. (a) Romance from Second Concerto Wieniawski 

( b ) Hejre Kati Hubay 

MISS SHERWIN. 

IV. Delight Luckstone 

V. ( a ) You and Love D'Hardelot 

(b) I Hid My Love D'Hardelot 

(c) Where Blossoms Grow Sayis Souci 

VI. Invocation D'Hardelot 

MISS WILSON AND MISS SHERWIN. 



56 The St. Maky's Muse. 

The German. 
On Saturday night, September 17th, the opening german of the sea- 
son was held in the parlor of the school. The old girls for the most 
part went as the "suitors" and each took one of the season's "debut- 
antes." The german was very successfully led by "Mr." N. B. Lewis 
and Miss Sarah Fenner. All of the ladies were very becomingly 
dressed and the many colors harmonized beautifully. As there were 
a good many stags, all of the ladies had a grand "rush" and there 
were no "wall-flowers." All too soon, just as Home, Sweet Home was 
being played the 9:30 bell rang. All went gaily "home" after having 
"just the grandest time going." 

Changes. 

The old girls always find changes at St. Mary's when they return 
in the fall. This year there were not as many as usual and the only 
real change was in the two dormitories in Main Building. In the 
centre of the dormitories two alcoves on the side toward the New 
Wings have been torn down and here nice little seats have been placed. 
The girls in the dormitories are very proud of their "sitting-room." 
This certainly is a great improvement and adds much to the attractive- 
ness of the dormitories. 

New Officers. 

Among the striking changes of the school this year is that of the 
officers of the different organizations. 

In the first place, the Muse Organization has undergone a com- 
plete change. Now, there is a Muse Club, composed of about twenty- 
five of the upper classmen, and from this club the editor-in-chief and 
the business manager have appointed the board of editors. At a 
meeting called by Mr. Cruikshank in the Muse Room, Nell Lewis was 
elected editor-in-chief and Elizabeth Leary, business manager. The 
other members of the board are : Rebecca Wood, Janie Sims, Isabel 
Perry, Bessie Erwin, Byrd Henderson, Caroline Jones, Josephine 
Tonnoffski, Amelia Sturgeon and Elizabeth Hughes. 

The two Literary Societies had their first meetings on Wednesday 
night, September 21st, and are now ready to extend invitations to the 
new girls. The officers of the Sigma Lambda were elected at the 
final meeting in May of last session, but except for the president, the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 57 



election of the Epsilon Alpha Pi officers were postponed until this 
year's first meeting. The officers of the two societies are as follows : 

E A n 2 A 

Nell Lewis President Isabel Perry 

Rebecca Wood Vice-President Bessie Arthur 

Virginia Prettyman Correspondent Secretary Hortense Jones 

Elizabeth Leary Secretary Janie Sims 

Margaret Erwin Treasurer Byrd Henderson 

Bessie Erwin Historian Bessie Barnwell 

Millian Green Critic Lina Lockhart 

Ruth Wells Senior Teller Susan Rawlings 

Catherine Parker Junior Teller Julia Borden 

Rebecca Wood and Janie Sims have been appointed to lead the 
Chapel Line, and Bessie Erwin and Bessie Arthur are to act as Chapel 
Wardens. The practice inspectors are Amelia Sturgeon, Tissie Har- 
rison, Elizabeth Leary and Janie Sims. Amelia Sturgeon is librarian 
and Elizabeth Leary and Jennie Woodruff are the office assistants. 

Dancing Room. 
There is a great tendency this year among the student body to have 
"school spirit." It is believed that the addition of the Muse Boom 
will aid much in creating social intercourse among the girls. To fur- 
ther this feeling, all the girls are now required to remain every even- 
ing between dinner and study hour on the lower floors of Main Build- 
ing. Heretofore it has been customary to use the parlor regularly for 
dancing, but it is the general opinion of both faculty and students that 
the parlor will be more appreciated, if used only for dancing on Sat- 
urday evening and on other special occasions. The old dining room 
is to be fixed up more attractively, so that the girls may dance there. 

from the Old to the New 
Last year's class will for many years to come be remembered as the 
largest and as one of the "best all 'round" classes ever graduated from 
Saint Mary's. We take pleasure, as well as feel honored, in having 
three of that class, Mary Mitchell Chamberlain, Julia Coke and Nannie 
Lee, still with us, continuing their Music work. The Senior Class this 
year is rather small, but all of us realize that what it lacks in quantity, 
it makes up in quality. We are proud of it ! 



58 The St. Maby's Muse. 



The First Monday. 

As usual, the first Monday was a day of excitement with us. In 
twos and threes and parties almost all the girls set out about ten 
o'clock to buy their room supplies for the year. At every turn and 
in almost every store St. Mary's girls were to be seen looking over 
pictures, pennants, books, banners, pillows and everything else that 
goes to make up an attractive room for a schoolgirl. With a feel- 
ing that "we want our room to look the cutest" or "let's have ours 
just as attractive as the other rooms on our hall," the collection was 
as varied as it was unique, and immediately after getting home the 
decorating began. 

Domestic Science. 

The Rector has announced to us that just as soon as proper arrange- 
ments can be made we are to have Domestic Science taught in school. 
As this course will include both cooking and dress-making, there is no 
doubt but that it will be popular and successful, as well as most helpful. 

The Monitors. 

This year the privilege of studying in the rooms has been extended 
to more girls than the usual Juniors and Seniors. It has been decided 
that the older girls, those who have been here longest, should have more 
privileges than the younger girls. A kind of self-government system 
has been formed and monitors appointed by Miss Thomas for each hall. 
Nell Lewis was appointed chief monitor and it is her duty to overseer 
the whole plan. The other monitors for the respective floors and build- 
ings are : West Wing, first floor, Amelia Sturgeon and Julia Borden ; 
second floor, Rebecca Wood and Joanna Rogers ; East Wing, first floor, 
Bessie Erwin and Isabel Perry ; second floor, Bessie Arthur and Vir- 
ginia Prettyman ; West Rock, Patsey Smith, and East Rock, Tinsley 
Harrison and Nellie Hendricks. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 59 



School Gossip. 



All of us are glad to welcome back Bessie Arthur, Marie Thomas, 
Catherine Hawkins and Robah Bencini, who were all compelled to 
leave school during last year's session on account of illness. 

The Muse wishes to send good wishes to Susie Everett and Ila Roun- 
tree, both of whom were married during the summer and also to extend 
congratulations to the lucky men. 

We were all very sorry to hear that Ruth Critz had been in an au- 
tomobile accident and hope that she will soon be able to be with us 
again. 

We have had short visits from Mrs. ISTorthrop, Mrs. Reese, Mrs. 
Welch and Mrs. Ferebee, who all brought their daughters to school. 

We are glad to have back Helen McArthur, Helen Robinson, Lucile 
Brady, Bell and Elinor Davis, Millian Green and Hilda Broadwood, 
all of whom were unable to be with us the day school opened. 

Kathryn Parker has moved since school closed from Plainfield, ~N. 
J., to Princeton. 

There are more girls from "Over the Hill and Far Away" this year 
than usual. Millian Green is back from Denver. Helen Scobell, 
from Chihuahua, Mexico, will be with us again in a few days. 

We are also glad to have another Chihuahua girl with us, Yvonne 
Baber. Mr. Owen brought with him from Montana Zona May Shull 
and Mary Gilbert. We are glad to have all of them and hope they 
will enjoy their year with us. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies. s s = = = Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, In 
the Interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1910-1911. 

Nell Battle Lewis, Editor-in-Chief. 
Bessie Smedes Erwin, Caroline Clarke Jones, Janie Rupfin Sims, 

Elizabeth Byrd Henderson, Josephine Tonnoffski, 

Elizabeth Hughes, Isabelle Hester Perrt, Rebecca Bennehan Wood. 

Elizabeth Woodard Leary, Business Manager. 
Amelia Pinckney Sturgeon, Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

EDITORIAL. 



It is necessary at the start to say a few hackneyed things — things 
that each succeeding Muse Board has said, each succeeding year, in 
its opening number. But these same hackneyed things come under 
the head of the "old stories that are always new/' and the first is, that 
without the hearty co-operation of the student body, the Muse can 
not possibly be what it aims to be, a good student paper. We do not 
mean by co-operation, merely financial support, but the support of 
your genuine interest. 



It is necessary to repeat the policy of the Muse,, so that our new 
readers may know what to expect. The magazine will continue to 
be a school newspaper and not a literary attempt, and will make the 
effort to be interesting at once to the alumnse, the student body and 
friends of the school. 



The Muse wishes to extend a hearty welcome to old girls and new. 
We only hope, to quote a former editor, that they may be as interested 
in the Muse as the Muse is in them. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 61 

Athletics have started off with great enthusiasm. We have noticed 
that for several years they have started with much zest, but the en- 
thusiasm usually dies about the end of the first month. But of course 
there's one fact, this year, that points to continued interest and ulti- 
mate success : heretofore we've had only one teacher enthusiastic about 
athletics ; now we have two. Good ! 



Everyone is much interested in the new "monitor system," which 
allows many of the older girls to study in their rooms. Up to this 
time, there has been little or no responsibility imposed upon any of 
the girls except the members of the Senior class, and it seems to us a 
good thing to make the older girls feel more responsibility. 



There are few of us here now who can remember the old ""Muse 
Room" which was in existence some four or five years ago. This year 
we are glad to say, it has been reinstated, and one of the rooms in 
West Wing has been attractively fitted up for the purpose. The Muse 
Room is not only to be the "sanctum sanctorum" for the Muse Board, 
but it is also to be a students' sitting-room, open at all hours to 
those who will come. We hope in this way to encourage a new fea- 
ture in school life a feature supplied in most schools by the Y. W. 
C. A. or the literary societies, but which heretofore at St. Mary's has 
been neglected. The Muse urges all the girls to come down as often 
as they can and stay as long as they will. 



62 The St. Mary's Muse. 



TIMELY TOPICS. 



The Solitary Weeper. 

(AFTER WORDSWORTH.) 

Behold her, single in the gloom, 

Yon solitary, homesick lass, 
Sighing and sobbing by herself — 

Stop here or gently pass. 
Alone she now bemoans her lot, 
Forsaken in this dreadful spot. 
Ah, listen! for the air around 
Is rendered dismal by the sound. 

Will no one tell me why she weeps? 

Perhaps the plaintive wailings rise 
From memories of her happy home 

That spring before her eyes; 
Or does she sit and meditate 
How dire and awful is the fate 
Of her who needs must wisdom seek 
And go down town but once a week. 

No place as this in all the world 

Seems quite so God-forsaken, 
And at the thought her cringing form 

By choking sobs is shaken. 
No sweeter thing was ever heard 
Than her dear mother's parting word; 
But she's two hundred miles away, 
And this is just the second day. 

Whate'er the cause, the maiden wept 

As if her grief would have no ending. 
'Twas up to me to comfort her, 

So, o'er the damsel bending, 
Although not very good at it, 
I tried to cheer her up a bit — 
"Ah, well, this week's always the worst; 
We all felt just that way at first." 

Nell Battle Lewis. 



The St. Maey's Muse. 63 



The Sorority Girl and Fraternity Man. 

The sorority girl and fraternity man 

Were politely conversing one day, 
And very few people in many a mile 

Were half so important as they. 

They had singled each other out right from the first, 

Although they were strangers — for that 
Made no difference at all, since each noted at once 

That the other belonged to a "frat." 

So they gazed at each other in most approved style. 

"Ah, yes, 'twas refreshing to find, 
From out of the commonly vulgar array, 

A person at last 'of your kind.' " 

The fraternity man was most beautifully clad; 

But this hardly need be expressed, 
For of course the ideal fraternity man 

Is supposed to be faultlessly dressed. 

And it is the ideal fraternity man 

Whose "merits" are chanted herein; 
The regular, typical, elegant "sport," 

The man with the "crown-jeweled pin." 

The elegant manners displayed by this youth 

Would fill an onlooker with awe; 
But of course easy manners came natural to him, 

For what's a fraternity for? 

It is needless to say that the lady had all 

The accomplishments mentioned afore; 
And besides all of these, a long pedigree, 

Reaching fully a mile, maybe more. 

She also had money to throw to the birds, 

There were jewels bedecking her hands, 
And at home her French maids (there were eighteen in al 1 } 

Awaited her slightest commands. 

But why waste our time with such details as these, 

The most obvious things in the world ? 
For everyone knows if it wasn't like that 

She'd ne'er been a sorority girl. 



64 The St. Mary's Muse. 

So the two chatted on very amicably, 
Of rituals, "goats," grips and "sich," 

For naturally minds as prescribed as were theirs 
Would run in the same shallow ditch. 

And as they strolled home through the gathering dusk, 
And sighed, "How fast time there did slip!" 

They ended, as it was quite proper they should, 
By giving each other the grip. 

****** 

Oh, sorority girl and fraternity man, 

Could you but see yourselves as you're seen, 

The ideals you cherish as noble and high 
Would seem to you petty and mean. 

Though a girl hasn't pedigree measured by miles, 

And a man doesn't boast a silk hat, 
Let me quote you the words of the dear old Scotch bard: 
That "A man is a man for a' that, 
And a' that," 
And a woman is too 
"For a' that." 



ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mr3. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - { £ r rs ' ?** £ e R- Me ares, Wilmington. 

(Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh. 

President - Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - - - - Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 

Secretary - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - . . Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 

Field Secretary ... Miss Mary F. Henderson, Salisbury. 



EDITORIAL. 



To the Members of the Alunuiw Association: 

There were two reasons why I accepted the presidency of the Asso- 
ciation, where otherwise I should have hesitated in spite of my deep 
appreciation of the honor : Mrs. Iredell wished it ; and I felt sure 
of your sympathetic co-operation in the work. 

You know that some of the decisive battles of history have been 
called "Captains' Battles," because the credit of victory did not belong 
to a single leader but to many co-equal officers, each doing undaunted 
service in his particular place. Let us have a Captains' Battle this 
year with splendid, unified service all along the line. 

I believe it is a time of awakening and renewing. The Centennial 
of last Spring brought many of us together and made us realize afresh 
the strength of the bond of St. Mary's — the tenderness of old memo- 
ries and the warmth of present affection. Miss Mary F. Henderson, 
of Salisbury, 1ST. C, has promised to give her services to the work of 
organizing branches of the Alumnse Association in places where there 
are none, and of talking to the chapters which already exist about our 
plans for the winter. Her work will bring us in closer touch with St. 
Mary's and with one another. I shall be glad of letters from any 
of the chapters or from those interested in any place where it may be 
possible to organize a chapter. Miss Henderson's itinerary is not yet 



66 The St. Mary's Muse. 

definitely mapped out, and any letters or suggestions relating to it 
should reach me during October. 

Before the annual meeting next May the Executive Committee is 
hoping for an Association of one thousand active members. 

It can be done if you will help, "St. Mary's girl" of yesterday ! 
Faithfully yours, Margaret Btjsbee Shipp. 



REfJD !— MflRK !— fJCT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



' It's worth the difference " 



WHARTON & TYREE 



Workers in Artistic Photography' 



The college men are very slow, 
They always take their ease, 

For even when they graduate 
They do it by degrees. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



THEBOYLAN-PEARGEGO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

THIRD GENERATION OF SUCCESSFUL 
BANKING. 

All patrons treated with every courtesy. 
New accounts solicited. S:ife Deposit Boxes 
for rent. Fire and Burglar Proof Vault. 

Chas. E.Johnson, President. 
F. H. Bkiggs, Cashier. 



THOS. H. BRIGQS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

Jolly £r Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 




St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 

Raleigh, N C. 

ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 



Hunter Bros. & Brewer Company 

Dry Gokds, Notions and Shoes 

210 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 



St. Mary's Seal Stationery, 
St. Mary's Seal Pins, 
St. Mary's Pennants, 
St. Mary's Calendars, 
May be had by writing to The Muse. 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 

Dr. L. D. CASTLEBURY 
Dentist 

AYCOCK & WINSTON 
Attorneys at Law 

raleigh, n. c. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE." 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 

GRIMES & VASS, Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 

MISSISS REESE & COMPANY 
Millinery. 

J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best c.f everything in our line. 
222 Fayetteville Street. 



Advertisements. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Invites correspondence with teachers open to en- 
gagement and with school officers seeking com- 
petent teachers. NO CHARGE TO SCHOOL 
OFFICERS. Full particulars free. 

CHAS. J. PARKER, Manager 




MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 

OF RAI.EIGH, N. C. 

Capital $100,000.00 4 per cent paid in Savings 

Department 
E. C. Duncan, Pres. W. B. Drake, Jr., Cash. 



A. H. FETTING 

Manufacturer of Greek Letter Fraternity 

Jewelry, 213 N. Liberty St., Baltimore, Md. 

Factory: 213 Little Sharp St. 

^Memorandum package sent to any fraternity 
member through the Secretary of Chapter. Special 
designs and estimates furnished on class pins, rings, 
medals for athletic meets, etc. 



HIRSHBERG ART COMPANY 

Art and Drawing Supplies, Frames, Prints, etc. 

418 N. Howard St., Baltimore, Md. 

The Yarborough House 

invites your patronage 



Two friends, Simpson and Jones, went out bathing. Jones was 
drowned. Simpson, though not possessing the gift of expression, 
nevertheless wished to break the news gently to Mrs. Jones. This is 
how he did it : 

"My Dear Mrs. Jones : — Jones's bathing-suit was washed out this 
afternoon, so he won't be home to-night. 

"Yours, Simpson. 

"P. S. — Jones was in the bathing-suit." 



KING'S GROCERY, 

"The Little Store." 


SEND TO 

Rummer's Stables 

For Riding and Driving Horses 


E. M. UZZELL & CO., 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
R\LE1GH, N. C. 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plnmhprs Steam and Gas Fitters. 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 


121 Fayetteville Street. 


CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 
Fayetteville Street. 


RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. Pullen, 
Pres.,Cbas. Root, Cash'r. Capital and Surplus 
$75,000. Four percent interest paid on deposits. 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO 

The WELL-KNOWN WASHINGTON MANUFACTURING 

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Advertisements. 



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Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

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Roses, Carnations, Viol-ts, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
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Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 
Repairing promptly done. 



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Everything in Art. 
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Calendar for October. 

October 1, Saturday — Sigma Lambda Reception. 
October 10, Monday — Faculty Recital. 
October 15, Saturday — E. A. P. Reception. 
October 19, Wednesday — State Fair Day. 
October 20, Thursday — First Pupils' Recital. 
October 31, Monday — All-Hallowe'en. 



NORFOLK -SO UTH ERN RAILWAY 

New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

Express train service between Raleigh, Wilson, Greenville, Goldsboro, Kinston, 

New Bern, Morehead City, Washington, Plymouth, Elizabeth City, 

Virginia Beach and Norfolk, Virginia. 



VIA NORFOLK TO NORTH AND EAST 
VIA RALEIGH TO SOUTH AND WEST 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Marts School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

{for girls and young women). 

69th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 15, 1910. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 19, 1911. 



St. Mary's 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 
S. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



offers instruction in these 

Departments: / £ THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1909-10 were enrolled 250 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Muck Equipment New. Thirty-two 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector. 



"November, 1910 




z 



St. /nbar^'s Abuse 

Hlbett Smebes fIDemortal Bumber 



Ussuefc at 

tfounbers' 2)a?, X910 



<* 



IRaleiob, B. C. 



A— 1 



1 




THE REVEREND ALDERT SMEDES, D.D., 1810-1877 
Founder and First Rector of St. Mary's 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

FOUNDERS' DAY NUMBER. 

Vol. XV. November, 1910. No. 3 

Second Aldert Smedes Memorial Muse 

This number of the Muse is intended to aid in preserving the memories of the 
exercises of April 20, 1910, which commemorated the centennial of the birth of the 
founder of St. Mary's; to keep fresh the memory of Dr. Aldert Smedes and Dr. 
Bennett Smedes, his son, and their great work for St. Mary's ; and to quicken the 
spirit and increase the interest of all St. Mary's girls and friends of the School. 



Contents. 

Editorial. 

A Brief Account of the April 20th Exercises. 

Centennial Poem Emilie Watts McVea. 

Bishop Strange's Address on April 20th. 

Fragments from the Day's Observance : 

(a) After-luncheon Speeches. 

(b) The Alumna? Meeting. 

(c) The Evening Entertainment. 

(d) The Memorial Alms-Basin. 

Dr. Bennett Smedes: A Tribute Alice Bugger Grimes. 

The New York Chapter's Observance of the Centennial. 

Reminiscences of My School Days (1850-55) Mary Wheat Shober. 

Alma Mater, the School Song. 

A List of the Alumnae Present on the Occasion, and of Those Responding to the 
Invitation to be Present. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 1 

Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = « = = = Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, In 
the Interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

Ernest Cruikshank Alumnse Editor. 

EDITORIAL. 



The interest of alumnae in the contents of this number of the Muse 
which was promised them last spring, has been shown by many inqui- 
ries. Both alumnae who were present on April 20th and those who were 
not able to be present have written to know about the appearance of the 
publication. While apologies for the delay may well be in order, we 
confine ourselves here to saying that it seems a very appropriate time to 
issue this Muse in time for the alumnae meetings on All Saints' which 
commemorate Founders' Day, and it is hoped that the contents of this 
Muse may prove suggestive and helpful for those Founders' Day meet- 
ings. The events of the celebration of April 20th belong now to the 
history of St. Mary's; a part of the events of the day were purely 
ephemeral, a part will always prove stimulating to those interested in 
St. Mary's and like institutions. 



There are presented herewith half-tone reproductions of the photo- 
graphs of Dr. Aldert Smedes and Mrs. Smedes, his wife, which are con- 
sidered most satisfactory by their children. These photographs had 
seemingly not been published prior to the Centennial last April and 
were furnished by the courtesy of Mrs. Chas. Root (Annie Smedes). 
It is a great pleasure to be able to present them here. 



Instead of attempting to summarize the spirit of the April 20th Cele- 
bration anew, it may be more profitable to republish here the editorial 
from the Raleigh News and Observer which appeared April 21st: 



The St. Mary's Muse. 69 

The pounder of St. Mary's. 

The celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Rev. Aldert Smedes, 
founder of St. Mary's School in Raleigh, was an event of deep interest in this and 
other States. Dr. Smedes was the best type of educator the North has given to the 
South, who became in sentiment and in purpose and spirit a genuine Southerner. 
After the attempt of the Episcopal Church to establish a school for boys in Raleigh 
had failed, Dr. Smedes was induced by Bishop Ives to come to Raleigh and establish 
the school that has grown into far-famed St. Mary's. It was built upon faith and 
the ability of Dr. Smedes, who had the rare combination of being a good scholar, a 
strong preacher, and an excellent business man — a combination, which Col. Charles 
E. Johnson, in responding to a toast, said was rarely found. 

It was a happy thought to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of Dr. Smedes's 
birth by inviting the alumnae back to a reunion, and the occasion yesterday was full 
of interest and inspiration. The address of Bishop Strange was a beautiful and 

I discriminating portrayal of the life and service of Dr. Smedes, showing the large 
contribution he made to his church and to the education of North Carolina women. 
The address by Miss Emilie McVea, now Dean of the Woman's Department of Cin- 
cinnati University, was as able and instructive as it was charming and delightful. 

; Miss McVea is the most accomplished and distinguished of St. Mary's graduates, 
and has made reputation by her brilliant career in Cincinnati. Her address was 
philosophical and would have been worthy of the head of Vassar and Smith, and 
Miss McVea was the recipient of warm congratulations from the audience that 
received her thoughtful address with every manifestation of approval and sympathy. 
The larger field into which woman is entering and the place of the woman who does 
not marry was touched upon with wisdom. The address is printed elsewhere. 

The history of St. Mary's is a history of one of the State's most useful educa- 
tional institutions. It has not only drawn large patronage from this State, but as 
well from half a dozen Southern States, having yearly brought to Raleigh a number 
of the flower of Southern girls. In his day Dr. Smedes made it stand among the 
foremost. His patriotic son, Rev. Bennett Smedes, D.D., continued the School upon 
the high plane upon which it was established by his distinguished father. Since 
his death it has continued to grow, and under the wise administration of Dr. Lay is 
growing into larger usefulness and increasing its equipment and hold upon its 
constituency. 

It is well, in a day when too much stress in education is being placed upon endow- 
ment, buildings and equipment, to pause and contemplate the superiority of the 
early teachers over brick, stone and money. Dr. Smedes rented the St. Mary's prop- 
erty after the failure of the boys' diocesan school, and without elegant buildings or 
costly equipment or a dollar of endowment did a work greater than any successor 
will accomplish with larger equipment and more money. Bishop Strange truly said 
there is more in the man than in the implements of education, and that the educators 
of the type of Dr. Smedes laid deep and broad foundations upon which, with larger 
equipment, strong men of this and future decades will build St. Mary's School. In 
doing honor to the progressive men who are bringing about the largest development 
of education in North Carolina, it is well not to forget the sacrifices and successes 
of the pioneers in establishing St. Mary's and like educational institutions. 



70 The St. Maey's Muse. 

A Brief Account of the April 20th Celebration. 

PROGRAM. 

Tuesday, April 19, 1910. 
8 : 00 p. m. In the Parlor. 

Informal meeting of the Alumnae, with music by the faculty. 

Wednesday, April 20, 1910. 
8 : 00 a. m. In the Chapel. 

Celebration of the Holy Communion. 

11:00 a.m. In the Chapel. 

Processional Hymn, No. 179 — "Hark! the Sound of Holy Voices." 
Shortened Morning Prayer. 

Hymn No. 671— "While Thee I Seek, Protecting Power." 
Brief Address. 

The Rector. 

Hymn No. 176— "For All the Saints Who From Their Labors Rest." 

Concluding Prayers. 

Recessional Hymn — "Jerusalem, High Tower." 

11:40 a.m. In the Auditorium. 

Chorus— "Blow, Soft Winds" Vincent. 

Chorus Class. 
Violin Solo. 

Miss Margaret Locke Erwin. 
Accompanied by Miss Bessie Smedes Erwin. 
Address. 

Rt. Rev. Robert Strange, D.D. 
Violin Solo. 

Miss Emilie Rose Knox. 
Accompanied by Mrs. Knox ("Eliza Smedes.") 
Address. 

Miss Emilie Watts McVea. 

Trio — "Dreaming" Harry Rowe Shelley. 

First Sopranos. Second Sopranos. 

Misses Lena Everett. Misses Paula Hazard. 

Nannie Lee. Exum Meares. 

Mary L. Manning. Lilias Pratt. 

Altos. 
Misses Julia Borden. 
Aimee Moore. 
Helena Smith. 
1 : 00 p. m. In Clement Hall. 

Alumna luncheon, followed by brief after-dinner speeches. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 71 

3:00 p.m. In the Auditorium. 

Alumnae Meeting, Mrs. Iredell presiding. 
Opening Prayer. 
"Alma Mater." 

Greetings from the Absent Alumnae. 
General Business. 

6:30 p.m. In the Chapel. 

Hymn No. 403 — "Oh Mother Dear, Jerusalem." 

Shortened Evening Prayer. 

Hymn No. 396— "Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand." 

8 : 30 p. m. In the Auditorium. 

Student Evening. 
Complimentary to the Alumnae. 

The celebration of April 20th in honor of the centennial anniversary 
of Dr. Aldert Smedes was the most ambitious attempt at an alumna? 
celebration that has yet been made in the history of St. Mary's. Proud 
of the new buildings with their much increased and greatly improved 
accommodations, and thoroughly imbued with the belief that the best 
way to foster the prosperity of St. Mary's and promote its growth in 
the right lines is to cultivate an even deeper alumna? interest and to get 
the alumna? so far as possible to feel that St. Mary's is still theirs as in 
their school days, the School authorities made an earnest effort to reach 
every living ex-student outside of Raleigh with an individual invitation 
to be present, and to reach every Raleigh alumna through the newspa- 
pers. The out-of-town alumna? were invited to a home-coming and 
entertainment at the School was contemplated for as many as would 
come. It is estimated that the living alumna? outside of Raleigh num- 
ber about three thousand, and what with changes in name and addresses 
and the fact that only very imperfect alumna? records are existent, it was 
considered a fair showing to be able to address 1,000 of that 3,000. 
Again, the inertia of years and the want of habit in connection with 
alma mater were not to be thrown off in a day and it was not to be 
expected that many alumna?, however much interested, would be able 
to throw aside their home duties and cares and come back even for a 
day; that requires habit and the habit is yet to be formed, as we hope 
it will be in time. So it was rather a pleasant surprise when 300 of 
the 1,000 invited took the trouble to reply to the invitation, and a source 



72 The St. Mary's Muse. 

of gratification that fifty out-of-town alumnae found it possible to be the 
guests of the School for the occasion. 

The festivities really began with the coming of the "old ladies" (for 
"old ladies" the present-day students insisted on calling them all, 
whether they were alumnae of one or of fifty years' standing). The 
students had vacated their rooms in the two new wings and there the 
guests were comfortably established on their arrival. Monday after- 
noon most of them came and each received a warm welcome from old 
friends and younger sisters, who felt, whether they knew them or not, 
that they were friends. Mrs. Kate DeRosset Meares, of Wilmington, 
St. Mary's girl and teacher, and so long the valued Lady Principal in 
the early '80's with Dr. Bennett Smedes, shared the special honors with 
Miss Emilie W. McVea, '84, of Cincinnati, who was to be the speaker 
of the occasion. The weather conditions were perfect and the spirits 
of all seemingly perfectly attuned for the celebration, and from first to 
last everything went smoothly. 

On the evening of Monday the visitors gathered informally in the 
Parlor where they were greeted by the local alumnae with Mrs. Iredell, 
the Alumnae President, as chief representative, by the teachers, and by 
the girls, and a very pleasant hour was spent in renewing old memories 
and feeling new experiences, after which an informal recital was given 
by members of the Music Faculty. The Parlor, despite the improve- 
ment in its arrangements, is still essentially the Parlor of old, and so 
long as the portraits of Bishop Ravenscroft and of Bishop Ives and the 
Confirmation Group retain their accustomed places, and the portraits of 
Dr. Aldert Smedes and Dr. Bennett Smedes hang at either end of the 
room, it will seem much like home to most St. Mary's girls. 

Tuesday morning the Centennial observance began with the Early 
Celebration in the Chapel at 8 o'clock, Bishop Strange being the Cele- 
brant and the Rector assisting. 

At 11, with the procession into the Chapel, the main program of the 
day began. The procession has long been a feature of St. Mary's and 
never did it appear to greater advantage than at this time. The pro- 
cession entered in the usual order — first, choir ; then students ; last, 
clergy — and there were present in the Chancel Bishop Strange, Rev. 
Dr. Pittenger, Rev. Mr. Barber, Rev. Mr. Ingle, and the Rector. Dr. 




..' 



/ 



MRS. ALDERT SMEDES, 1812-1887 

The Wife of the Founder 



The St. Mart's Muse. 73 

Pittenger read the Lesson, after which the Rector stated the purpose of 
the occasion — to do honor to the memory of a great man. 

It was not a merely casual or perfunctory thing, he said, that the 
observance of this occasion began with a service in the Chapel, for it 
was there that all the work of the School centered. It was in the Chapel 
that one saw the beginning and foundation of all the ideas for which 
the Founder of the School had wrought. An educator who recently vis- 
ited Raleigh had declared that St. Mary's had the right idea, something 
other schools lacked, a chapel devoted exclusively to the worship of God. 
Yoimg people had ideas, affections, and character and their memories 
after leaving the School always went back to things that centered in the 
Chapel. At a recent meeting of educators, after the many immediate 
problems of education had been fully discussed, the management, with 
a fine sense of proportion, chose for the last speech a subject which was 
essential to the true purpose of the whole meeting and which made a 
striking and appropriate closing to its deliberations. This speaker said 
that education which only gave facility in knowing things and skill in 
doing things and did not center around character would amount to noth- 
ing. St. Mary's, Mr. Lay asserted, was founded by Dr. Smedes on a 
rock, religion, on the service of God, and he had instilled these princi- 
ples so firmly that the students when they went out into the world had 
as their ideal to serve God, their Creator and Maker. 

At the conclusion of Mr. Lay's address, Bishop Strange offered the 
final prayers and the benediction, and then singing the familiar "Jeru- 
salem, High Tower," which brings such a peculiar thrill to most St. 
Mary's girls on account of their association of it with Commencement 
and other special occasions, the procession passed to the Auditorium. 

The Rector, with the speakers, the clergy, and members of the Trus- 
tees — Dr. Lewis, Colonel Johnson, Mr. Erwin, Mr. Royall, and Dr. 
Battle — occupied seats on the rostrum, and after the singing of the open- 
ing chorus, and the violin solo by Misses Margaret and Bessie Erwin, 
pupils of the School, daughters of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Erwin, of Dur- 
ham, and granddaughters of Dr. Smedes. the Rector introduced Bishop 
Strange. 

Bishop Strange, whose address is printed elsewhere herewith in full, 
did not review the life and works of Dr. Smedes in detail, but in a 

A— 2 



74 The St. Mary's Muse. 



thoughtful address delivered with his accustomed power, spoke chiefly, 
of elements in the character of the founder of St. Mary's. 

Following Bishop Strange's address, Miss Emilie Rose Knox, grand- 
niece of Dr. Smedes and a pupil of the School, played a violin solo, 
accompanied by her mother, Mrs. A. W. Knox (Eliza Smedes, '79), 
after which the Rector introduced Miss McVea. Miss McVea, who is 
professor of Eraglish Literature and Dean of the Woman's Department 
in the University of Cincinnati, in addition to being one of the most dis- 
tinguished of St. Mary's daughters, has been of late years a leader in 
promoting the alumnae activities of the School, and her address proved in 
every way worthy of her. She took as her subject "Education and the 
Needs of Today" and discussed the persent-day problem confronting 
women with much wisdom and understanding. Miss McVea's address 
has been published by St. Mary's as a School Bulletin and copies may 
be had on request by any of those interested. 

The morning's exercises concluded with a trio, and from the Audito- 
rium, by invitation of the Rector, the guests adjourned to Clement Hall 
for lunch. 

The luncheon proved one of the most pleasant features of the day. 
Places had been laid for 300, giving place for 150 students and a like 
number of guests. It was the first opportunity many had had to see 
the new Dining Hall, which is an unfailing pleasure to all at St. Mary's. 
After proper attention had been paid to an excellent though simple 
luncheon, an hour was devoted to brief after-dinner speeches, the Rector 
acting as toast-master. The responses were as follows : 

The Welcome: For the School The Rector. 

For the Church Bishop Strange. 

For the Trustees Col. Johnson. 

For the Students Miss P. Hazard. 

The Response : For the Alumnge Mrs. R. W. Winston. 

For the Smedes Mr. W. A. Erwin. 

For the Sister Schools Dr. D. H. Hill. 

Toasts. 

The Days of Dr. Aldert Smedes Mrs. J. T. Mason. 

The Teachers Mrs. Archibald Henderson. 

The Celebrities Miss M. A. Dowd. 

The Average Girl Mrs. W. E. Shipp. 

The St. Mary's Girl of To-day Mr. Josephus Daniels. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 75 

At 4 :00 o'clock the Alumnae assembled in the Auditorium for a busi- 
ness meeting, Mrs. Iredell presiding. The Rector opened the meeting 
with prayer and a chorus of students sang "Alma Mater." Mrs. Iredell, 
the President, made a brief speech appropriate to the occasion, ending 
by calling on Mrs. Meares for a word of greeting. Mrs. Meares in re- 
sponding showed remarkable strength and after expressing her pleasure 
at being able to be present, told of her part in the formation of the 
Alumnae Association thirty years before and recalled the fact that she 
was the first president of the Association. 

At the request of the Chairman, Miss Dowd read extracts from letters 
of alumnae absent, and then the representatives of the several alumnae 
Chapters present spoke briefly for their Chapters. Mrs. Iredell then 
yielded the Chair to Miss McVea and committees were appointed to 
• take action upon various matters of importance to the Alumnae and to 
report at the May meeting. Adjournment was taken from this meeting 
to the Commencement meeting of May 26th.* Fifteen towns were rep- 
resented in the meeting, which also included among its numbers Mrs. 
Annie Haywood Ruffin, one of the "original thirteen" present at the 
opening of St. Mary's, May 12, 1842. 

At 6 :30 the usual evening service was held in the Chapel and at 8 :30 
the final meeting of the day — an evening of entertainment offered by 
the students to the alumnae — a "Student Evening" — was held. There 
was nothing profound in the entertainment which was intended rather 
to recall scenes of their school days to the alumnae present, but the even- 
ing seemed to be heartily enjoyed by the large audience present. With 
it the celebration was over. 



*A full account of the Annual Alumnae Meeting of May 27th, with a copy of the 
Constitution and By-laws of the Association adopted at that meeting, and other 
alumna? information, is issued by the School as a School Bulletin (June, 1910), and 
may be had on request. 



76 The St. Mary's Muse. 



A Centennial Poem. 



Emilie Watts McVea. 



The century has passed that saw the birth 
Of that far-seeing and deep-hearted priest, 
St. Mary's noble founder and wise head. 
To-day, oh mother loved ! thy daughters come 
To celebrate this happy time with thee, 
To pledge anew to thee their loyal faith, 
To live again the hours of past delight, 
Of youthful dreams, of youthful work and sport, 
The joyful words, the hours carefree or big 
With splendid vision of the coming years. 

In spring-time when the century oaks 

Of our loved grove gleamed faintly green, 

And purple violets starred the new-sprung grass, 

We hastened joyful to the outdoor hour, 

Returning with hands full of richest bloom. 

In autumn when the hickory trees flamed gold 

Against the dark blue of November sky, 

We stored the smooth shelled nuts for winter use 

And beautified with leaves of nut and oak, 

Golden and red, our chapel dim and brown. 

Games, too, we had on snowy winter days, 

And played at Greeks and Trojans, building high 

Our mimic fort of snow soon battered down 

To be rebuilt in friendly rivalry. 

And higher hours there were when studied facts 

All dry and cold became a living truth 

To touch the quickened soul to issues fine. 

Most dear the crowning oaks, the sweep 

Of circle green secure from step profane; 

The clustering vine, the cherished Marechal Niel 

Clambering in golden riot o'er the roof 

Of eastern rock house door; the ivied tree, 

Alas ! long since destroyed by wind and storm ; 

The royal bloom of rich Wistaria 

Perfuming all the air at Easter tide. 

Dear above all the modest chapel, nestling 

Small and brown amid the spreading trees, 

The chapel dedicate through all the circle 

Of the changing years to daily prayer, 

To sacred feast or joyous festival. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 77 



Beloved scenes, we greet thee with full hearts, 
Remembering well the past, rejoicing now 
That all the lengthening years are bringing thee 
New power and ever larger usefulness. 

But with more grateful hearts and greater joy 
We greet those here to-day who in the past 
First lured our wandering steps to studious ways. 
From them we learned the mystery of the stars, 
From them the charms of Chaucer's April sweet, 
Of Spenser's knights and wondrous Faerie Queene. 
The haunting verse of poets old sounds still 
In tones that read it then, the dearer now 
For tender echo of earlier days. 

Then, too, with reverent love and voices hushed 

We greet the "other living called the dead," 

Who clearer made for us the way of life. 

One in the early years with spirit brave. 

With power of command and guidance true, 

Helped mould St. Mary's in its infancy. 

Long since she fell asleep. A building 

On these grounds will bear her name, her love 

To all St. Mary's girls that are to come. 

Another we recall of alien faith 

But of a love so broad it took no count of creeds, 

A gentle presence and a friend beloved. 

A trusting guileless soul of courage high, 

In midst of suffering faithful unto death. 

And yet another still, beloved beyond 

The power of words; true teacher, perfect friend, 

Of keen, unbiased mind, of judgment clear : 

No pettiness could live in that pure air 

Of high-born truth and rare sincerity. 

Oh ! friend most dear, our voices break in tears, 

Remembering all you were and all you wrought. 

And lo ! as we in loving thought recount 

The service of these dear ones gone before, 

It seems again the day of all the saints ; 

Again there peals through chapel fair with flowers 

The swelling organ tones of long ago. 

A silence falls ; then from that silence sounds 

A priestly voice repeating blessed words 

Forever sacred to the feast of saints: 

"The souls of righteous ones are in God's hands." 



78 The St. Maky's Muse. 

And as we who listen know his thoughts 
Are with the father, teacher, priest 
Whose work he held a sacred heritage. 
To-day with vision keen we pierce beyond 
The veil of sense to the high courts of heaven 
Where these two men of God are standing victors, 
And as we yield thanksgiving and high praise 
For all the good their faithful lives have wrought, 
We thank God always for our blessed dead 
And for their noble works that follow them. 



Bishop Strange's Address. 

Few places are dearer and more sacred to me than St. Mary's. It 
has been a sweet and familiar name all my life. Thither in early days 
came the young girl who was to be my mother ; and, about the same 
time, came she who was to be the mother of my wife, a second dear 
mother to me. Aunts and cousins innumerable have been trained here ; 
and under these old oaks my only daughter has grown and developed 
into Christian womanhood. Though I did not have the privilege of 
knowing in person him who under God made St. Mary's, I have been 
taught from childhood to honor and revere Dr. Aldert Smedes. So it 
has been — the coming today and preparing to come — a labor of love, 
which I could not decline, a labor of love which I rejoice to do. Thus, 
you see, it is as near an alumna as we poor men can hope to be, who 
comes today to speak to his fellow alumnse. I shall confine my address 
this morning to him in whose honor we have fixed on this day, to him 
who was born this 20th day of April one hundred years ago, Dr. Aldert 
Smedes. 

Dr. Smedes, it seems to me, illustrates as few men have done the 
value of the man over against theories, plans and institutions. Dr. 
Smedes planted himself on the ruins of failure and reaped out of them 
a rich harvest of success. This spot you know was bought by the Church 
for a boys' school. After a few years of stormy life it failed ; and it 
failed so completely that the Diocese gave up the venture and sold the 
property. Dr. Smedes came to Raleigh with the approbation of Bishop 
Ives, rented the grounds and buildings, opened a school for girls and 
made out of it and with it a success of which we are all proud and for 
which we are all grateful. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 79 

We see in him again the value of the man in the Teacher. What 
was it that influenced parents to send their girls to St. Mary's and keep 
them here % Not so much the course of studies, though that course was 
good. jSTot so much the accomplishments which they acquired here, 
though they were of the first rank. Not so much the climate and the 
food, though they were equal to the best. JSTot even because St. Mary's 
was a Church school, as important as that was. But I think the chief 
reason was Dr. Smedes, the man at the head of the school. It was the 
character, the personality of the man who controlled and trained their 
daughters. They wished their growing girls to come into close personal 
touch with the high soul, the pure heart, the kindly courtesy, the firm 
self-control, the unflinching courage, the great ability, which radiated 
from that good and great man. Ah, my friends, it was the subtle sub- 
conscious influences really flowing forth from the inmost recesses of his 
being, which made the girls love and obey Dr. Smedes. There is a 
world of truth in that old couplet : 

"I do not like thee, Dr. Fell; 
The reason why I can not tell; 
But this I know, and that full well : 
I do not like thee, Dr. Fell." 

It is something more than instinctive aversion, when we are honest 
with ourselves. In the real makeup of such a man or woman there is 
something lacking or something repulsive, against which the best in us 
unconsciously rebels. There are others who have that, who are that in 
themselves, which attracts subconsciously all that is best and highest in 
our very selves. So I would urge upon all who are striving to be real 
and useful teachers, successful in the highest sense : Eemember that the 
character of the teacher rather than the mind, the personality rather than 
the ability, is the main thing that counts. We must be ourselves true, 
high, self-controlled, noble, if we would make our pupils so. 

Dr. Smedes showed his character and ability, the nobility and the wis- 
dom of the man, in the choice of his life work. He was providentially 
led to take up this work, some of you may answer ; but, my friends, all 
of us at last are providentially led, if we only have the vision to see the 
Divine hand. He considered and concluded that the best work he could 
do was to train girls into Christian women, the teachers, wives and 



SO The St. Mary's Muse. 



mothers of our land ; and I agree with him. What can be nobler, what 
can be more useful to our civilization than to shape and mould the home- 
makers of the country ? Home is the center and the source of all that 
is best in our civilization, and the mother is the center and the queen of 
the home. Napoleon said : "The hand that rocks the cradle moves the 
world." Dr. Mclver said publicly that he had studied closely in his 
own mind, had looked out on the State and its needs ; and he had come 
to the conclusion that the training of girls for the life they have to lead 
is the very best work a man or a woman can do. So he went to work on 
the Normal School for women at Greensboro, and there did his great 
work for the State. I reckon the future historians of North Carolina 
will declare that, perhaps, Charles Mclver was, in his day, the most 
useful citizen in all our Commonwealth. 

Along the same lines, Dr. Smedes was the chief missionary of the 
Church in North Carolina. He devoutly believed in religion as the 
basal element in the making of moral and spiritual character, and he 
believed as earnestly that this Church of ours is the best builder of 
Christian character; and, therefore, he trained his girls in her sweet, 
wholesome ways. Many under his teaching were set in their Church 
principles, and many were turned into her gates. When they went out 
into life they became, in all parts of the South, church workers, church 
missionaries. In the winter of 1889-90, Bishop Garrett, of Northern 
Texas, wrote to Dr. Bennett Smedes to ask that he would inform him 
regarding his father's method of teaching and indoctrinating his girls. 
"Tor," said he, "I find all over my diocese the beginnings of Sunday 
Schools and churches, the work of St. Mary's women ; and I am deter- 
mined to establish a church school for girls as the best means for build- 
ing up my diocese." Bishop Atkinson, in his convention address of 
1877, said: "I take this occasion to express publicly, as my deliberate 
judgment, that Dr. Smedes accomplished more for the advancement of 
the Church in this diocese and for the promotion of the best interests 
of society within its limits than any other man who ever lived in it." 
So I would appeal to you, teachers of girls, magnify your office, know 
that you are performing the greatest social service, feel that you are 
doing, perhaps, the noblest work on earth, exult in it, be proud of it, be 
grateful for it, rise to be yourselves worthy of it. And ye alumnse and 



The St. Mary's Muse. 81 

trustees and friends of St. Mary's, not only be proud of and grateful for 
the work St. Mary's has done for the Church in the past ; but see to it, 
see to it in every way possible, that St. Mary's shall continue to exercise 
in the future strong and gracious influence for our dear Mother Church. 

Let me now hold up for your admiration and your example three 
characteristics of Dr. Smedes, by which it seems to me he was especially 
distinguished. 

The first was his capacity to sympathize with his surroundings and 
to assimilate himself to their conditions ; to be contented with his home 
wherever that might be. He came South a married man, came into an 
almost different civilization ; he settled here and identified himself with 
the people and their customs. !No man thought him a mere sojourner 
here; no man heard him harping on our lack, comparing it to the ful- 
ness he had left behind. He saw the best in us ; he complimented that, 
and he strove with all his might to make that good the controlling ele- 
ment in our opinion and character. He trained his daughters with the 
other Southern girls in St. Mary's; he sent two of his sons to Chapel 
Hill ; and in the great Civil War he and his children espoused the South- 
ern cause, two of his sons yielding up their young lives on the red field 
of battle. Here he teaches us all sympathy with our neighbors, content- 
ment with our work and home. 

Two people — a man and a woman — who knew him intimately, have 
written me that love was his great characteristic, love in its broadest 
meaning, the love that desires to give and to bless. He loved people ; 
he saw the good in them, encouraged that good and brought it out in 
every way. He loved his girls in the same wise way, realizing the 
tender, delicate, refined nature of a true girl ; and so, he was always 
courteous and polite, kind and considerate, gentle even in reproof, never 
wounding the feelings, except when necessary to punish severely. The 
love that we call charity he displayed most freely in caring for the poor 
in his neighborhood, and in extending the benefits of St. Mary's to girls 
who were not able to pay for an education. There never was a better 
opportunity for such charity than during the war and the reconstruc- 
tion ; and never was opportunity more fully or more freely grasped. 
St. Mary's was full in those dark days ; and a wise friend of mine has 



82 The St. Mary's Muse. 



said to me that he often wondered at the time how Dr. Smedes could 
even feed these scholars and guests. 

A third characteristic that his friends will recognize was courage — 
moral and physical courage ; that noble quality which partakes of hope 
and faith, which on one side means trust in God and on the other means 
confidence in oneself. The glove was velvet which he placed in your 
hand — so modest and gentle was he ; but, when occasion demanded, that 
hand within the glove was felt to be steel — so brave and fearless was he. 
It took a courage akin to faith to sustain him in breaking up his home 
in New York and in coming to start a new school, for which he alone 
was responsible, in a new land. It took a courage springing from fear- 
less self-confidence which could make him quiet with a look the wild 
young men from Chapel Hill, or speak his mind to General Howard at 
the head of his soldiers camping in this very grove. Love, courage, 
sympathy, a noble trilogy, for each of these words carries a whole story 
in itself; they stand out from the rounded, beautiful character of Dr. 
Aldert Smedes : virtues that make the man we love, admire and follow ; 
virtues that show the man to be the noblest work of God; virtues that 
point out to us the man who walks the path the Saviour trod. 

One more thought. What was Dr. Smedes' ideal for St. Mary's ? 
Not a school for high scholarship, though that was good ; not a place to 
teach society arts and manners, though it was very good for them; not 
to gather together a great number of pupils, paying for their work, en- 
riching their principal ; no, not all these. His ideal was to make St. 
Mary's a training school for Christian womanhood, a place to make a 
Christian woman, simple, refined, useful, pious, breathing forth ever 
those subtle, uplifting powers that come only from pure Christian char- 
acter. 

Let us keep to that ideal. Let us not look forward to ever increasing 
numbers ; let us select the number we can fully train and send them 
forth, as Dr. Smedes did, to be missionaries to their less favored sisters. 
Not to be fashionable women, though we would not have our girls pecu- 
liar in their dress or manner. Not to be great scholars, though we must 
keep our standard high and thorough. But we must pray and strive to 
keep St. Mary's up to the ideal of its wise and noble founder ; we must 



The St. Mary's Muse. 83 

strive and pray that St. Mary's be, far above all other things, a training 
school for Christian women, true daughters of our dear old Church, 
home makers of our beloved country ; ah ! the highest and richest gift 
that God has given to earth : a blessing to her husband, a blessing to her 
children, a blessing to all who come within the sphere of her gracious 
and purifying influence. 

Notes from the Day's Observance. 



The After-Luncheon Speeches. 

The after-dinner speeches proved one of the most pleasant features 
of the Celebration. The speakers' tables were at the south side of the 
Dining Room, flanking the entrance, with the Rector presiding. The 
visiting alumna? occupied the tables toward the center of the room and 
the girls were at the tables toward the sides, thus enclosing the visitors 
and making them feel doubly at home. With the Rector sat the special 
guests of honor — Mrs. Meares, Mrs. Iredell, Miss McVea, Mrs. Leak 
(representing the Smedes family) and Bishop Strange. Mr. Lay was 
very happy in his introductions and the speakers entered heartily into 
the spirit of the occasion. 

The Welcome to the visitors and especially to the Smedes family was 
given by the Rector for the School, by Bishop Strange and Col. Chas. 
E. Johnson for the Trustees, and by Miss Paula Hazard of the Senior 
Class for the students. Mrs. R. W. Winston (Phronie Horner), of 
Raleigh, responded for the Alumnae ; Mr. W. A. Erwin, of Durham 
(Mrs. Erwin being "Sadie Smedes," the youngest of Dr. Aldert Smedes' 
three daughters) for the Smedes family, and President D. H. Hill of 
the A. and M. College for the sister schools. 

Then followed the toasts of the Alumnae. Mrs. John T. Mason (Nel- 
lie Jackson, '79-'80) spoke for Dr. Smedes's girls on "The Days of Dr. 
Aldert Smedes"; Mrs. Archibald Henderson (Minna Bynum, '03), of 
Chapel Hill, toasted "The Teachers"; Miss Martha A. Dowd ('84) of 
the School Faculty spoke of "The Shining Lights," and Mrs. Win. E. 
Shipp (Margie Busbee) of "The Poor Students." In conclusion Mr. 
Josephus Daniels of the News and Observer spoke admiringly of "The 
St. Mary's Woman of Today." 



84 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Before introducing the speakers the Rector spoke in part as follows: 

"In carrying out the work of this School it should be the endeavor of 
all of us to reverence the past and to preserve all things in it that were 
true and noble, while having our eyes set towards the future ; so that in 
our present work we may even improve on that past, while holding in 
highest esteem those high principles on which the School was founded. 
So far as I am able it has been my constant effort to carry out the ideals 
of Dr. Aldert Smedes; but while we all try to do this we must not fall 
into the error of being content with doing things as he did them then. 
We must try to do things in the present as we believe he would have done 
them, if he were living now. 

"In thinking over his work, the great things he accomplished, and the 
ambition towards even higher things which he must have had, my mind 
turns back instinctively to the life, the work, and the ideals of the first 
Rector of the great school in which I spent twenty-three years of my 
life. From three boys in 1856, Dr. Henry Augustus Coit saw grow 
up, under his loving, skillful and judicious care the leading church 
school of the country, with 340 boys at the time of his death in 1895. 
When his friends would congratulate him on the great things he had 
accomplished, he would answer with the wisdom of the seer : 'Yes, we 
have much to be thankful for ; but oh, it is so far short of what I 
dreamed V 

"We may well believe that Dr. Aldert Smedes also saw visions. He, 
too, looked forward to greater and better things, and we best honor his 
memory by trying to give fulfillment to those greater things which he 
hoped for, and doubtless saw with the eye of faith, in the future." 

While all the speeches aroused much interest and good feeling, it 
would perhaps be not invidious to say that Mrs. Shipp's delightful 
toast to "The Poor Students" (the "Average Girl") awakened the 
keenest delight, especially on the part of the present day girls. 

Miss Paula Hazard, for the students, spoke as follows : 

"Others have welcomed you in behalf of the School and the Trustees, 
and now it becomes my pleasant duty to extend to you the welcome of 
the whole student-body. 

"For weeks we have been thinking of your coming and have been 
assisting in the preparations for your reception. At first we were 



The St. Mary's Muse. 85 

rather awed and frightened at the thought of having so large a number 
of grave, dignified alumnae, but now our fear and awe have vanished 
as at a magic touch, for we have found that after all you are merely 
girls grown up. We are beginning to know you and feel at home with 
you, and we hope that you now also feel at home with us in this new-old 
St. Mary's. We feel drawn to you by ties of relationship as well as of 
new-formed friendships, for very few girls are there here whose moth- 
ers or grandmothers or other relatives were not at some time in the past 
members of the School. Moreover, we know that many of you were 
here with Dr. Aldert Smedes, whose hundredth anniversary we are 
celebrating to-day and of whom we have heard so much from his devoted 
admirer and our beloved friend, Miss Katie. If you were so fortunate 
as to know him, we see the results of the teachings and example of his 
life ; through you, we who did not know him, honor and love him, and 
because of him, no less than for your own sakes, we love and honor you. 
Through you Dr. Smedes' influence has reached us, and let us hope that 
descending thus through each succeeding generation it may grow and 
increase, 'be a lamp and a guide to our feet,' until its effects become 
boundless and endless. 

''Some of you are the embodiment of the past, of the old St. Mary's ; 
we, of the present, of the new St. Mary's. Great has been the past and 
the achievements of the old St. Mary's; we feel that great also is the 
present and the progress of the new St. Mary's. We honor the past, 
we love the present ; we believe in the future of our School ; and it is our 
hope and belief that the ideals for which St. Mary's has alwavs stood 
— those high, noble ideals which yon so truly represent — will never grow 
dim, but that they will ever be held high and clear before all present and 
future students. 

"You have come now bringing to us a message from the past — the mes- 
sage of the duty and the beauty of love and loyalty to your Alma 
Mater's ideals. For that message we thank you, and my earnest hope 
is that each one of us will cherish it and lay it to heart evermore. Again, 
to you, the student body of yesterday, we, the student body of today, bid 
our warmest and heartiest welcome. 

"To prove to you how great was our fear and awe at the thought of 
your coming and how quickly all such feeling vanished upon our meet- 



86 The St. Mary's Muse. 

ing you, I will read to you a few verses written not by myself but by a 
faithful friend of the School, one whom we all know and respect :" * 

Welcome to the Alumnae. 

The wild, untamed Alumnae is ramping through the Grove, 

It is ramping through the basement, it is ramping up above. 

The timid little scholars are hidden round in holes, 

With terror in their faces and horror in their souls; 

They fear the wild Alumnae will drag them out in bunches 

And take them to the dining room and serve them up for lunches. 

They fear for scenes of carnage ; they fear for deeds of blood ; 

Where frightful great Alumnae drag scholars to the wood 

To eat them at their leisure, or — tell them (in the cool) 

How things were done in our day, when we were here in school. 

Or give them admonition as to how to cut their dresses, 

Or lecture on the sin of wearing rats among their tresses : 

Or give them goody-good advice on the subject of the boys, 

And show them just how wrong are things one really enjoys. 

These thoughts were dreams of yesterday and certainly not nice, 
Our hearts stood in our bodices like chocolate sundae ice; 
We heard that you were coming and naturally took fright, 
But all our horrid dreams of you have vanished with the sight. 
Our dense and total ignorance must stand as our excuse — 
We didn't know a "wild untamed" when we saw it running loose. 
How could we know that Al-um-nae wore really stylish hats, 
And some of them, it's plain to me, are not averse to rats? 
How could we know that Al-um-nae were really folksey folks, 
Just full of fun and jollity and running o'er with jokes? 
We're really glad to see you and glad to have you here : 
We've bid adieu, on seeing you, to every foolish fear. 
Our hearts within our bodices have melted all the ice; 
We're really glad to see you and think you're very nice. 



The Alumnae Meeting. 

Alumnse Meetings are usually held in the Studio in the Art Building, 
but the numbers assembled on the 20th seemed to make it wise to sub- 
stitute the Auditorium as the meeting place and there the Alumnae as- 
sembled at four o'clock, with Mrs. Iredell, the President, presiding. 

Mr. Lay offered the opening prayer, after which the Alumnse joined 
the chorus of students in singing "Alma Mater." Mrs. Kate deR. 

*Mr. H. E. Hodgson. 



The St. Maey's Muse. 87 



Meares, of Wilmington, the first President of the Alumnae Association 
and Lady Principal from 1878"'82 under Dr. Bennett Smedes, who had 
braved the infirmities of advanced age and failing eyesight to be present 
on the occasion, spoke briefly but feelingly of her recollections and ex- 
tended a greeting to her younger sisters present. Miss Dowd read ex- 
tracts from the letters of regret received from alumnae in various parts 
of the country and of all ages, including among others those of Rev. 
McXeely DuBose, the former Rector ; Miss Jessie Degen, '94, from 
Portland, Maine; Miss Isabel Brumby, "0-i, from Dunedin, Florida; 
Miss Bessie Whitaker, '93, from Cuba ; and Mrs. Troy Beatty (Fred- 
erika Mayhew, '87), from Athens, Ga. Greetings from girls of an older 
generation came from Mrs. R. E. Livingston of Georgia, Mrs. K. P. 
Battle, Sr., of Chapel Hill, Miss M. E. Erwin of Morganton, and Miss 
Ad E. Smith of Scotland Xeck, who has since passed to the other world. 

Mrs. Iredell then made a short speech of welcome, expressing the 
pleasure at the goodly number present, the enthusiasm and the wide 
representation. She asked for a few words from the representatives of 
the several Alumna? Chapters and brief responses were made by Miss 
Henrietta Collins for Hillsboro, Miss Myrtle Disosway for Xew Bern, 
Miss Mary Henderson, '03, for Salisbury, Mrs. W. L. Wall (Annie Col- 
lins, '80) for Durham, Mrs. W. D. Pruden (Annie Wood) for Edenton. 
Miss Georgia Hales, '09, for Wilson, and others. The Xew York Chap- 
ter sent word that while they could not celebrate at the same time they 
were planning for an observance of the Centennial for the following 
Saturday in ISTew York City, and an account of that meeting is included 
in this Muse. 

The following towns were represented in the meeting: Asheville, Bal- 
timore, Chapel Hill, Charleston, Durham, Edenton, Elizabeth City, Fay- 
etteville, Goldsboro, Henderson, Littleton, Xew Bern, Pittsboro, Ra- 
leigh, Rocky Mount, Salisbury, Scotland Neck, Spartanburg. Tarboro, 
Washington, Wilmington, Wilson. 

After the responses from the delegates, Mrs. Iredell yielded the chair 
to Miss McVea, and the meeting proceeded to the consideration of gen- 
eral alumna? business. In taking the chair Miss McVea made valuable 
suggestions to the association which were discussed in some detail and 



88 The St. Mast's Muse. 

resulted in the appointment of several committees which were directed 
to investigate the matters referred to them and report at the Commence- 
ment Week annual meeting. These Committees were as follows: 

To draft a Constitution for the Association — Mrs. Knox, Miss McKimmon, and 
Mrs. Eoot. 

To consider the best means of furthering the interests of the Alumna? Chapters in 
the different towns — Mrs. Waddell, Miss Sutton, and Mrs. Winston. 

To nominate officers and an executive committee and submit such nominations to 
the Alumna? Chapters — Mrs. Holmes, Mrs. Henderson, and Mrs. Leak. 

Miss McVea suggested important changes in the conduct of the St. 
Mary's Chapters, saying they should be made more social in their aspect 
and that the financial side of alumnae obligation should be made only 
secondary. 

At six o'clock the Association adjourned to meet again in annual 
session on Tuesday in Commencement Week (May 24th). 



The Student Evening. 

PROGRAM. 

1. Glee from "The Red Mill." 

Chorus Class. 

2. Members of the Freshman English Class in Scenes from "As You Like It." 

Act III— Scene 2. 

Act V — Scene 1. 

Cast of Characters. 

Orlando, son of Sir Rowland de Bois Mary Owen. 

Jacques, a lord attending on the bountiful duke Alice Hines. 

Touchstone, a clown Mary Seddon. 

Corin, a shepherd Evelyn Maxwell. 

William, a country fellow in love with Audrey Edna Wood. 

Rosalind, daughter to the banished duke Helen Adams. 

Celia, daughter to Frederick Mildred Brown. 

Audrey, a country wench Mary Gibbes Mitchell. 

3. Members of the Sophomore German Class in German Songs. 

Die Wacht am Rhein. 

Die Lorelei. 

Du lieber Augustin. 

4. Trio — "Experience." 

Misses McArthltr. Haughton and H. Jones. 

5. Song. 

Mary Louise Manning. 
Violin Obligato, Margaret Erwin. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 89 



ti. Chorus from "The Japanese Girl" (Finale of Act I). 

Miss McArthub and Chorus. 
Miss Ella Dorroh, Accompanist. 

7. Members of the Primary Department in Musical Numbers. 
Miss Eleanor Vass Mann, Accompanist. 

(a) Geography. 

Lucy Lay. Mildred Willlford. Katherine Hughes, Nancy Lay, 
Elizabeth Hughes, Alice Giersch. Josephine Willltord. Bessie 
Folk. 

(b) To the End of the Earth with You. 

Josephine Willlford. 

(c) Lovely Day for a Walk. 

Katherine Hughes and Alice Giersch. Josephine Williford and 
Elizabeth Hughes. 

(d) Fege Man. 

Lucy Lay. 

(e) Yama Yama Man. 

Mildred Willlford, Bessie Folk, Nancy Lay. Alice Giersch. 

S. Scene and Chorus from "The Japanese Girl." 

Mrs. Chas. McKlmmon and Chorus. 
Miss Ella Dorroh. Accompanist. 
Sopranos. Altos. 

Fannie Lamb Haughton Sarah Barnwell 

Paula Hazard .Julia Borden 

Hortense Jones Margaret Erwin 

Nannie Lee Mary Gaither 

Lillias Pratt Lucy Harrison 

Exum Meares A. Sturgeon 

Katherine Smith 
Millian Green 

The "Student Evening/' which was intended to revive memories of 
the entertainments of their own days for the visiting Alumnae, included 
a series of selections from entertainments given in 1909 and 1910 by the 
different student organizations. With just a dash of each sort the pro- 
gram passed from the Shakespeare scenes to the German songs, from the 
appearances of the Primary children in their songs to the more ambi- 
tious choruses of the "*. Japanese Girl." 

Mr. R. Blinn Owen of the Music Faculty, Director of the Chorus and 
Orchestra, deserved the credit for the musical numbers, and his produc- 
tion of ''The Japanese Girl" with the Chorus Class on the Saturday 
after the Celebration proved one of the great successes of the session. 



90 The St. Mary's Muse. 

while Miss Towers of the English Department presented members of 
her Freshman English Class in the Shakespearean scenes, and Mrs. 
Carol L. Mann (Miss Cribbs), the former head of the Elocution De- 
partment, revived the children's scenes from her success of the previous 
year. 

The students were delighted at the opportunity to join in the enter- 
tainment of the Alumnae, and the visitors seemed to enter fully into the 
entertainment offered. 

The Memorial Alms-Basin. 

One of the interesting events of the Centennial Celebration was the 
presentation by the daughters of Dr. Aldert Smedes — Mrs. M. T. Leak 
(Bessie Smedes) of Durham, Mrs. Chas. Root (Annie Smedes) of Ra- 
leigh, and Mrs. W. A. Erwin (Sadie Smedes) of Durham — to the 
Chapel of St. Mary's of a handsome silver Alms-basin, made by Geissler. 
The basin bears the inscription "To the Glory of God and in loving 
memory of Rev. Aldert Smedes, D.D., the Founder of St. Mary's School. 
Presented on the hundredth anniversary of his birth. April 20, 1810- 
1910. Given by his daughters." 



Dr. Bennett Smedes: An Appreciation. 



ALICE DI7GGER GRIMES (MRS. WALTER GRIMES). 



The first impression of Dr. Bennett Smedes, which I gained as a 
young girl of fifteen, was, as I afterward learned from years of close 
contact with him, the dominant note of his whole life, love. I remember 
very well arriving in Raleigh one cold January night. In a carriage to 
meet the new pupil were Dr. and Mrs. Smedes. Just across from St. 
Mary's the carriage stopped, and Dr. Smedes alighted. When the door 
of the carriage was closed, Mrs. Smedes told me that every night without 
fail he went across to his sister's to take tea with his mother, who was 
then old and very feeble and living with her daughter, Mrs. Root. 

This love of son for mother aroused at once a keen personal interest on 
the part of the new pupil. Homesick as I was, a sense of security sur- 
rounded me, and I'm sure that every girl who has been fortunate enough 



The St. Mary's Muse. 91 



to count herself a St. Mary's girl during the regime of Dr. Bennett 
Smedes has felt the same sense of loving protection. 

I've often wondered since my school days how many husbands of old 
St. Mary's girls measure up to the example he gave us of the proper 
attitude of husband toward wife. Strictly the head of his household, 
he was a companion of infinite tenderness, sympathy, and understanding. 
a man to lean upon, to look up to, to thank God for. One of the sweetest 
memories of Dr. and Mrs. Smedes is that of their daily afternoon walks 
out from the school grounds, arm in arm. This old time courtesy never 
left him in the performance of the slightest duty or amenity of life. 

And such a father ! Patient, loving, entering into every pleasure of 
his three little girls, even to the extent of digging bait or harnessing the 
goat ; and what St. Mary's girl of the late eighties or early nineties has 
forgotten the goat or the time Christine Sanders "'did up" the goat's 
whiskers in curl papers ? 

The loving soul of this lovely man embraced many more than those of 
his own immediate household. Scores and scores of girls living through- 
out the South today can testify to the love extended to them in a thor- 
oughly practical way, that of reduction in price of board and tuition, in 
payments deferred for years, and in numerous cases the giving of many 
months' expenses, even to the necessary books, sheet music and station- 
ery. During several years of the eighties and nineties the income of 
the school did not meet the expenses. Every business and every profes- 
sion in the South was at low ebb financially; schools, of course, felt the 
depression. So earnest was Dr. Smedes, so intent upon continuing the 
work begun by his father, so unwilling to say no to worthy and ambitious 
girls, that year after year— about seven years, to be more exact — he paid 
the difference between income and expenses from his own pocket. This 
condition of affairs could not continue indefinitely, yet Dr. Smedes made 
no overtures to the Diocese of Xorth Carolina until he had spent upwards 
of thirty thousand dollars of his own personal funds. 

His firmness, his modesty, his mental attainments, his appreciation of 
the beautiful and of brilliancy and wit are well known to all of us, but 
it is of his love and loveliness that I speak here and which it was given 
to me to know and comprehend. 



92 The St. Mary's Muse. 

The Smedes Centenary Meeting of the New YorK Alumnae. 

On Saturday, April 23, 1910, just one year after its organization, the 
New York Chapter of the St. Mary's Alumnse Association met at the 
home of Miss Louise T. Wickham in New York City to celebrate the 
one hundredth anniversary of the birth of Dr. Aldert Smedes, the 
Founder of St. Mary's School. 

The meeting was opened by Miss Florence Slater, President, with a 
few appropriate remarks. Then followed the calling of the roll and the 
reading of the minutes of the last meeting by the Secretary, Mrs. Evert 
Bancker Smedes. Miss Slater presented a very bright and entertaining 
sketch of Dr. Smedes' s life, enlivened by many personal recollections of 
the charm and wit of that majestic man. 

Miss Lizzie Jones recalled most interestingly the life at St. Mary's 
when she was a pupil, describing the old dormitory days when each 
small alcove had to be shared by two girls — and how on winter mornings 
before the time of steam heat and running water, the pupil often must 
needs break the ice in the pitcher in order to perform her ablutions. 

Following Miss Jones's reminiscences, a poem by the Rev. J. E. C. 
Smedes, a brother of Dr. Aldert Smedes, entitled "A Greeting to St. 
Mary's," was read by Mrs. E. B. Smedes, after which Mrs. Mary Wheat 
Shober, who was a pupil fifty years ago, gave a delightful paper, "St. 
Mary's in My Day," full of humor, pathos, and charm, and replete with 
witty sally. A few informal remarks on the influence of the St. Mary's 
girl in the church life and of the State were made by the Rev. Mr. 
Seagie, Rector of St. Stephen's Church, New York City. Mr. Seagle, 
originally from western North Carolina, had in his early years oppor- 
tunity of judging the missionary character of the St. Mary's girl in the 
remote districts of the State and spoke very interestingly on the subject. 

Mr. Evert Bancker Smedes at the conclusion of the program recounted 
several amusing and delightful anecdotes portraying the favor with 
which all of his old pupils and many elderly ladies of his acquaintance 
had regarded Dr. Aldert Smedes. 

The Chapter and its guests having partaken of very dainty and deli- 
cious refreshments, for the sake of auld lang syne, Mrs. Payne ("Chip" 
Roberts) played one of her old-time ringing waltzes, such as often awak- 



i 



The St. Maey's Muse. 93 

ened the echoes in the St. Mary's Parlor in days gone by, and, it is need- 
less to say, with the same result. 

The meeting then adjourned until October, 1910, when many matter* 
of importance will come up for discussion. 

The regular members present were : Mrs. Mary Wheat Shober, Miss 
Lizzie Jones, Miss Florence Slater, Mrs. Chas. Payne, Mrs. E. B. 
Smedes, Miss Ethel Hughes, Miss Mabel Hughes, Miss Mary Pride 
Jones, Miss Christine Busbee, Miss Esther Means, Miss Mamie Ros- 
sell, and Miss Jean Carson. Regrets because of their inability to attend 
were read from Mrs. Chas. Baskerville, Miss Anne Moore, Miss Mary 
Hanekel, Miss Caroline Means, Mrs. Chas. Eish, and Mrs. Xorwood 
Giles. 



Reminiscences of My School Days. 



MARY WHEAT SHOBEE. 



I entered St. Mary's School in 1850. My father, the Rev. Dr. John 
Thomas Wheat, had just been elected to the professorship of Rhetoric or 
Logic at the University of ]STorth Carolina, at Chapel Hill. He was also 
Chaplain with Dr. Mitchell, also Professor, who gave the Presbyterian 
service on alternate Sundays. 

My father had arranged with Dr. Smedes, as we passed through Ra- 
leigh, to enter me as a pupil, and I was brought there through the kind- 
ness of Bishop Ives in his private carriage, which saved me a disagreeable 
journey of thirty miles all night in the stage. When the Bishop left me, 
and I found myself sitting all alone on a davenport in the hall while my 
arrival should be announced, a perfect stranger not only to all in the 
School, but to all in the State, and oh, so homesick ! I can recall seeing 
a tall, stately, dignified young woman pass by. I immediately con- 
cluded she must be one of the teachers, but later I discovered my mistake. 
She was Mary Daves, of ]STew Bern, who afterwards became the wife of 
our first War Governor, Ellis, and she was one of my dearest friends 
from that time. 

Soon Mrs. Smedes came down to greet me, and a warm welcome she 
gave me, and was ever afterwards like a dear mother, who did all in her 
power to soothe the most homesick girl she said she had ever seen. 



94 The St. Mary's Muse. 

The Rock House on the east side of the main building, on the ground 
floor was the Chapel, fitted up in a very appropriate manner, very 
churchey, so it impressed me. Services were held there twice daily. 
The upper floor was used as the Art Studio and teachers' rooms. In 
rainy weather we went to Chapel, through the "covered way," as it was 
called. There were two dormitories on the third floor of the main 
building. The east one was where I was assigned an alcove. My mate 
was Fanny Caldwell, of Charlotte, where her father was in charge of 
the United States Mint. My predecessor in the alcove, who had just left 
school, was Kate Alexander, who blossomed out as one of North Caro- 
lina's great beauties. 

Need I go into detail as to the arrangement and furnishings of these 
dormitories % The cunning little cuddies two girls shared together, con- 
sisting of a washstand, a few shelves, a chair, and there you are. Oh, 
I forgot the most important thing — a looking-glass not larger than eight 
by ten inches ! How we did love to decorate and beautify our boudoir ! 
Such curtains for shelves and washstand, with a fancy bright cover for 
trunk ; pictures of loved ones on the wall, nicknacks wherever a place 
could be found. Our beds so narrow were outside, one on each side of 
the entrance to the alcove, where a curtain hung to give privacy to the 
occupants. On very cold nights — for there was no steam heat in those 
days anywhere — our teacher, Miss French, who had charge of the Dor- 
mitory and occupied a larger alcove at the head of the Dormitory, would 
allow us to push the two beds together and make one bed, where we two 
girls could snuggle up together in each other's arms, and sleep the sleep 
that only the young can ever know and enjoy. The first night our beds 
were separated, and I was too homesick to sleep. I heard the rising bell 
the next morning when the servant first picked it up in the hall and 
started to ring, coming up the stairs from the hall on the main floor, 
through both dormitories, and up and down the passway between the 
beds. I thought that morning she made noise enough to raise the dead. 
It was not long, however, before my sleep was so profound I never heard 
the bell, and my alcove mate had to shake me before I could be made to 
realize another day had dawned. There was no running water on every 
floor, but instead two huge tubs stood at one end of the hall which were 
filled every morning, and out there we hustled with rather small pitcher 



The St. Mary's Muse. 95 

to fill for our ablutions. The next ring of the bell was for prayers, and 
a bad mark was the result if one was absent and could not answer "■here." 
Many a morning I have knelt in line just inside the door of the school 
room, where morning prayers were held, while the last prayer was being 
offered, and in the mean time was buttoning up the back of the girl's 
dress in front of me, while the same kind office was being performed for 
me by the girl behind. 

The dining room was in the basement, right under the school room, 
which was on the west side of the main building. My seat at table was 
on my dear Mother Smedes's right hand, and between us sat the baby 
boy, Abe, in his high chair. He became so fond of me, that he would 
not eat anything except what I would put on his plate. I will say right 
here that I am very sure no boarding school of that day or this ever 
took more pains to provide wholesome and appetizing meals for their 
pupils. There was no exclusive or private table spread for teachers in 
my day, nor in this, I hope. After breakfast came walking hour, in 
which we were expected to walk briskly for the benefit of the exercise ; 
but there were some who would stroll leisurely along, arm in arm with 
our "dearest," never dreaming that rapidly approaching in the rear was 
our beloved Preceptor, who, on reaching the pair of loiterers, would lay 
his hands on their shoulders and start them on a quickstep, which had 
the effect of bringing roses to their cheeks for more than one reason. 

Among my schoolmates was, first of all and most beloved, Carrie 
Wright, who afterwards became the wife of Col. Robert Strange and 
mother of Bishop Strange ; Mag Henry, afterwards Mrs. Ed. Hayward ; 
Eliza Cotton, Mrs. Engiehard. Those two dear women, Mrs. Iredell 
and dear Katie McKimmon, were day scholars in short dresses then. 

The noble deeds our beloved Teacher did can hardly be estimated, they 
were so delicately, modestly accomplished. One of the noblest was when 
dear Stella Shaw entered St. Mary's, which from that day until she died 
became her home. This is her story as told to me : 

One day in the early days of the School a carriage drove up to the 
porch of St. Mary's School from which a lady of evident refinement 
and a little girl alighted. Introducing herself to Dr. Smedes, she 
wished to enter her child as a pupil. She was going on a long journey 
and wanted to leave the child under his care and would remit the tuition 



96 The St. Mary's Muse. 

as it fell due. Saying farewell, she drove away and was never heard 
of afterwards. That little girl was Stella Shaw, and from that day she 
was as a dear daughter to Dr. and Mrs. Smedes, always made to feel she 
was as welcome and as dear. 

ISTo grief or sorrow had ever come to dear Mrs. Smedes while I was a 
pupil. She was ever bright, and full of wit and humor. Her first 
grief, from which she never recovered, was the sudden death of her 
first-born son, Lyle, who died of typhoid fever only a month or two after 
his marriage to Miss Susan Dabney. Following that came the news 
quick and fast of the death of her two brave and noble sons, who gave up 
their lives on the battlefield during that bloody war between the North 
and the South. All these heavy blows completed the sad change that 
came over the once bright and happy Mrs. Smedes. 

In my day Lyle and Bennett were off at a boarding school near Ra- 
leigh, and they only came home over Sunday once a month. I can see 
Bennett now as I write, a beautiful boy of thirteen with rosy cheeks and 
curly brown hair and bright blue eyes, sitting next his father at the 
French table, and very shy. How well he filled his father's place you 
who came after me can testify. I became a frequent visitor to St. 
Mary's after I had become a full-fledged young lady from Chapel Hill, 
and those later days became confused with earlier in later years. 

After my marriage, and I had daughters old enough to send away to 
boarding school, it was my pride and pleasure to send to St. Mary's my 
three daughters, Anna May, Selena Roberdean, and Frances Wheat 
Shober. For from my own experience there can not be found a school of 
a higher grade or a sweeter, more refined home for girls in all this broad 
land than my dear Alma Mater, St. Mary's. I can not close this paper 
giving my experience and recollections without expressing my firm belief 
that it has been from the very beginning a Nursery for the Church, send- 
ing out enthusiastic, pious and zealous workers all over the United States. 
And now I will close with this heartfelt wish and prayer : God bless this 
School and all its alumnae, its faithful, devoted Hector, teachers and 
pupils. May it grow in strength and prosper for generations. 

From a pupil who has loved it for sixty years. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 97 



Alumnae Responding to the April 20th Invitation. 

The following list is meant to contain the names of the alumnae who 
replied to the invitation to be present at the April 20th Celebration. 
Doubtless other replies were made in informal manner and other names 
may have been omitted through oversight. It is hoped that any such 
oversight will be pardoned. 

The names of the Alumnae present at the celebration are marked with 
a star. The year of graduation of the graduates only is indicated. 

It should be borne in mind that no invitations were sent in Raleigh 
except to graduates, hence the interest felt by the Raleigh Alumnae is in 
no way shown in this list. 

The names are given as they were on April 20th; addresses corrected 
to date. 

Adams, Mrs. S. P. (Lila Morrison) Wilmington, N. C. 

Aiken, Mrs. Isaac M. (Fanny Bryan) Pensacola, Fla. 

Albertson, Miss Minnie, '81 Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Alexander, Mrs. J. H. (Mary G. Shields) Chase City, Va. 

Anderson, Mrs. Florence Chalk Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Arthur, Miss Bessie W Harrisonburg, Va. 

Badham, Mrs. Wm. ( Lucy Bond ) Edenton, N. C. 

Bailey, Miss Serena C Palatka, Fla. 

Barbee, Mrs. Algernon (Mary J. Parker) Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Barnes, Miss Bessie V Murf reesboro, N. C. 

Baskerville, Mrs. Chas. (Mary Snow) New York City. 

Battle, Miss Hattie B Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Battle, Mrs. K. P., Sr. (Martha A. Battle) Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Battle, Miss Pattie Viola Raleigh, N. C. 

Beatty, Mrs. Troy (Frederika Mayhew, '87 ) Athens, Ga. 

Beckwith, Miss Florence M Jacksonville, Fla. 

Bellamy, Mrs. Marsden, Jr. (Sue Clark) Wilmington, N. C. 

Bishop, Mrs. E. K. (Annie Stevenson) New Bern, N. C. 

Blackshear, Mrs. Thos. E. (Olivia Bryan) Pensacola, Fla. 

Blacknell, Miss Kate M Kittrell, N. C. 

Bland, Miss Virginia A Tryon, N. C. 

Bottum, Miss Frances Ranney, '09 Lemon Grove, Cal. 

Bowen, Miss Bland C Jackson, N. C. 

Bowen, Miss Ellen B., '00 Jackson, N. C. 

Bowen, Miss Harriet E., '96 Jackson, N. C. 

Bowen, Mrs. J. B. (Annie Erwin Moore) Spartanburg, S. C. 



98 The St. Maky's Muse. 

Bowers, Mrs. B. Frank (Lucy Tayloe) Washington, N. C. 

Boyd, Mrs. W. B. (Kate Snow) Goldsboro, N. C. 

Boyd, Mrs. W. G. (Annie Roberts) New Bern, N. C. 

Boykin, Miss Meta C Boykin, S. C. 

Boykin, Miss Sarah H Boykin, S. C. 

Bragaw, Mrs. Stephen C. (Maude Amyette) Washington, N. C. 

*Bridgers, Mrs. Annie Cain Asheville, N. C. 

Bridgers, Miss Mary Wilmington, N. C. 

Bridgers, Mrs. Jno. L. (Laura Clark) Tarboro, N. C. 

Brigham, Mrs. W. B., Jr. (Susie Wood) Augusta, Ga. 

Brown, Miss Marjorie Atlanta, Ga. 

Brumby, Miss Isabel A., '04 Dunedin, Fla. 

Bulluck, Mrs. R. R. (Rebecca Parker) Enfield, N. C. 

Burgwyn, Miss Minnie G., '04 Jackson, N. C. 

Buxton, Miss Anna N Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Cade, Mrs. Overton (Tolley Smedes) Youngsville, La. 

Calder, Miss Mary F Wilmington, N. C. 

Calvert, Mrs. W. J. (Mattie Ihrie ) Portsmouth, Va. 

Cannady, Miss Mary C Oxford, N. C. 

Capehart, Miss Clara C Avoca, N. C. 

Carr, Mrs. Edson (Morgia Hurt Worth) Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Carraway, Mrs. J. E. (Tempe Hill) Waynesville, N. C. 

Cheatham, Mrs. C. B. (Sallie Raney) Louisburg, N. C. 

*Clark, Miss Anna Barrow, '05 Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Clark, Mrs. Herbert W. (Annie Hawkins) Augusta, Ga. 

Clark, Miss Lilian Augusta, Ga. 

•Clark, Miss Nan G., '97 Tarboro, N. C. 

*Clark, Miss Rena Hoyt, '04 Tarboro, N. C. 

Cobb, Miss Lucy M Maxton, N. C. 

Cobb, Mrs. N. T. (Dot Atkins) Freeport, 111. 

Cohen, Miss Beatrice B., '07 Florence, S. C. 

Coke, Miss Carrie W Edenton, N. C. 

Coleman, Miss Cornelia, '04 Macon, Ga. 

Collier, Miss Sue E Goldsboro, N. C. 

*Collins, Miss Henrietta P Hillsboro, N. C. 

*Cooper, Mrs. Alex. (Ellen D. Fawcett) Henderson, N. C. 

Cox, Mrs. Thos. A Cullowhee, N. C. 

Crenshaw, Mrs. H. A. (Kate Davis) Louisburg, N. C. 

Crenshaw, Miss Helen Louisburg, N. C. 

Crow, Mrs. Geo. D. (Olive Armstrong) West, Texas. 

Cunningham, Mrs. James H. (Ann K. Gifford, '04) Fort Washington, Md. 

Cunningham, Miss Mildred, '00 Burlington, N. C. 

Curtis, Miss Lizzie Lincolnton, N. C. 

Dancy, Mrs. Frank B. (Bessie Grimes) Atlanta, Ga. 

Davis, Miss May Hill, '92 Raleigh, N. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 99 

Davis, Mrs. Paul E. (Bessie Poe Law, '05) Wilson's Mills, N. C. 

Degen, Miss Jessie, '94 Portland, Me. 

Devenish, Miss Alice G Asheville, X. C. 

Dewey, Mrs. Chas. (Annie Snow) Goldsboro, N. C. 

*Disosway, Miss Myrtle L New Bern, N. C. 

Dodd, Miss Lily, '99 New York City. 

Dorsey, Miss Laurine Henderson, N. C. 

*Dotterer, Miss Nathalie Charleston, S. C. 

*Dortch, Miss Ellen Goldsboro, N. C. 

Dortch, Mrs. W. T. (Lizzie Lewis) Goldsboro, N. C. 

Drane, Miss Eliza H., '01 Edenton, N. C. 

DuBose, Rev. McNeely Morganton, N. C. 

Durham, Mrs. James H. (Nan Hill Smith) Halifax, N. C. 

Dye, Mrs. R. H. ( Eula Rives Davis ) 

Edmunds, Mrs. Walter A. (Sarah Hardison) Memphis, Tenn. 

Eldredge, Mrs. Alfred S. (Jenniebelle Turner) Apopka, Fla. 

Eldridge, Miss Virginia A., '04 Raleigh, N. C. 

Egerton, Miss Estelle Hendersonville, N. C. 

Ehrlich, Mrs. Jno. G. (Annie S. Wells) Columbia, S. C. 

Elliott, Mrs. Geo. B. (Mabel Green) Wilmington, N. C. 

Emerson, Miss Elise Wilmington, N. C. 

Emerson, Mrs. Horace ( Janie Parsley) Wilmington, N. C. 

Engelhard, Mrs. Jno. C. (Margaret Hinsdale) Owensboro, Ky. 

Ennis, Mrs. R. W. (Bettie Garrett) Livingston, Ala. 

Erwin, Miss L. Matilda Morganton, N. C. 

Erwin, Miss Mary Louise Morganton, N. C. 

*Erwin, Mrs. W. A. (Sadie Lyle Smedes) Durham, N. C. 

Etheridge, Mrs. M. E Port Norfolk, Va. 

Fairley, Miss Kate Monroe, N. C. 

Farmer, Miss Lillian Hauser, '07 Waltersboro, S. C. 

Faulkner, Mrs. T. H. (Julia Bryan White) Kinston, N. C. 

*Fell, Mrs. J. H. ( Sallie London ) Trenton, N. J. 

Fellowes, Mrs. Edward H. ( Bessie Tucker ) Keswick, Va . 

Finley, Miss Louise, '89 Sewanee, Tenn. 

Foster, Miss Ruth, '06 Savannah, Ga. 

Fountain, Mrs. H. S. (Hannah Bacot) Timmonsville, S. C. 

Frost, Miss Susan P., '91 Charleston, S. C. 

Fulghuin, Mrs. Lizzie Collier Goldsboro, N. C. 

Garrison, Mrs. Joanna Costin Fayetteville, N. C. 

Gee, Miss Pattie Williams Hasbrouck Heights, N. J. 

George, Miss M. Elmer Marietta, Ga. 

Giles, Mrs. Clayton (Lucy Wright) Wilmington, N. C. 

Gilliam, Mrs. Charles M. (Blanche Syme) Petersburg, Va. 

Graham, Mrs. William A. (Annie Shepard) Durham, N. C. 



100 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Grant, Miss Florence L., '05 Wilmington, N. C. 

Graves, Miss S. Isabel, '84 Mount Airy, N. C. 

Gregory, Miss Elise Moore Chappells, S. C. 

Green, Mrs. Wharton J. ( Addie Davis) , Fayetteville, N. C. 

"Green, Miss Emily Davis Wilson, N. C. 

Gwynn, Miss Mary W Tallahassee, Fla. 

Haigh, Mrs. Charles (Alice Swan) Fayetteville, N. 0. 

~*Hairston, Miss Ruth W Davie County, N. C. 

*Hales, Miss Georgia S., '09 Wilson, N. C. 

Hamilton, Mrs. J. G. deR. (Mary Thompson, '00) Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Hamilton, Miss Lily R Pikesville, Md. 

Hamilton, Mrs. M. A. ( Sallie Badger ) Baltimore, Md. 

Hamlet, Miss Lalla Blackstone, Va. 

Hanna, Miss Isabel A., '08 Roland Park, Md. 

Hargett, Mrs. Fred Jacksonville, Fla. 

Hardin, Mrs. Oscar L. (Suma Little) Charlotte, N. C. 

Harris, Miss Jessie Page Henderson, N. C. 

Harrison, Mrs. H. S. (Mary Garrett) Enfield, N. C. 

Haskell, Mrs. E. R. C. (Magdalen Marshall) Charleston, S. C. 

* Haughton, Mrs. L. J. (Anne Mauger London) Pittsboro, N. C. 

Haughton, Miss M. L Wilmington, N. C. 

*Hawley, Mrs. Walter L. (Amelia McKimmon) Fayetteville, N. C. 

Hazard, Mrs. Walter (Florence Tamplet) Georgetown, S. C. 

Henderson, Miss Alice, '90 Washington, D. C. 

"Henderson, Mrs. Archibald (Minnie Curtis Bynum, '99) Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Henderson, Mrs. Charles (Laura Montgomery) Troy, Ala. 

'■Henderson, Miss Mary F., '03 Salisbury, N. C. 

Herbert, Mrs. Frank E. (Margaret Herbert, '04) Buckroe Beach, Va. 

Herndon, Miss Kate Savannah, Ga. 

Herring, Mrs. Charles H. (Pauline Shields) Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Hicks, Miss Georgia Faison, N. C. 

*Hicks, Mrs. Louis, '49-'52 Faison, N. C. 

Hill, Mrs. Annie Dortch Weaversville, N. C. 

Hill, Miss Eliza H Weldon, N. C. 

Hill, Mrs. N. M. (Camilla Ihrie) Pittsboro, N. C. 

Hill, Miss Rebecca Hillsboro, N. C. 

Hodgkins, Miss Bertha Atlanta, Ga. 

Hoke, Miss May L Central Point, Ore. 

*Holmes, Mrs. G. Hamilton (Marie Walker, '95) Tryon, N. C. 

* Holmes, Mrs. J. S. (Emilie R. Smedes, '84) Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Holt, Mrs. Erwin (Mary Wills Davis) Burlington, N. C. 

Hook, Mrs. John S. (Carolyn Clai'k) Augusta, Ga. 

Hoover, Mrs. Leach (Mary Harrison) Omaha, Neb. 

Hopkins, Mrs. Chas. (Florida Barnes, '96) Tallahassee, Fla. 

Huff, Miss Gladys Laurens, S. C. 

Hughes, Miss Carrie Chapel Hill, N. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 101 

Hughes, Miss Ethel New York City. 

Hughes, Miss Mabel New York City. 

Hughes, Mrs. N. C Chapel Hill, N. C. 

* Hunter, Miss Claudia Watkins Henderson, N. C. 

Hunter, Miss Mary Holton, '03 Portsmouth, Va. 

Huske, Mrs. W. Weldon (Elizabeth Manning) Fayetteville, N. C. 



* 



Iredell, Mrs. Mary Johnson Raleigh, N. C. 

* James, Mrs. Joshua T. (Mary C. London) Wilmington, N. C. 

* James, Mrs. Thos. C. (Alice Haughton) Wilmington, N. C. 

Johnson, Mrs. Richard (Sallie Collins Smith) High Point, N. C. 

Johnston, Mrs. C. P. (Annie E. Jones) New Orleans, La. 

Jones, Mrs. George C. (Daisy Scales) Mooresville, N. C. 

* Jones, Miss Margaret M., '96 New York City. 

Jones, Miss Mary Pride, '95 New York City. 

Josey. Mrs. Jas. L. (Martha S. Herring) Scotland Neck. N. C. 

Keller, Mrs. H. P. S. (Alice Love, '00 ) Raleigh, N. C. 

Kinealy, Mrs. J. H. ( Grace Strong ) Ferguson, Mo. 

King, Miss Theresa Albemarle, N. C. 

Kintner, Miss Nellie Best Buffalo, N. Y. 

Lamb, Mrs. Gideon (Lily Shields) Scotland Neck, N. C. 

*Lamb, Miss Olivia Hyman Henderson, N. C. 

*Lanier, Miss Miriam, '95 Tarboro, N. C. 

Law, Miss Emma A Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lay ton, Mrs. Joel G. (Maud L. Castlebury) Dunn, N. C. 

*Leak, Mrs. M. P. (Bessie Sebor Smedes) West Durham, N. C. 

LeCron, Miss Marguerite S., '08 Baltimore, Md. 

Lee, Miss Frances Hays Charleston, S. C. 

Lee, Miss Jennie San Francisco, Cal. 

Lewis, Miss Ellen W Jackson, N. C. 

*Lindsay, Mrs. W. E. (Ella Tew, 79) Glendale, S. C. 

*Loftin, Mrs. A. E. (Lizzie Pearsall) Wilmington, N. C. 

Loker, Miss Julia S Valley Lee, Md. 

Lyon, Mrs. Lyman H. (Ida Lee Bryan) Tarboro, N. C. 

Maag, Mrs. J. D. (Annie Dughi, '99) Baltimore, Md. 

Makely, Miss Agnes Edenton, N. C. 

Mallett, Miss Alice H Fayetteville, N. C. 

Manly, Mrs. Basil (Anita Hughes) Norfolk, Va. 

*Manning, Mrs. (Dr.) Jno. M. (Mamie S. Amyette) Durham, N. C. 

*Manning, Miss Mary S Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Manor, Mrs. W. E. (Blanche Blake, '00) Harrisonburg, Va. 

Marriott, Mrs. (Dr.) H. B. (Emily Pippen) Battleboro. N. C. 

Marshall. Miss Susan M., '96 Raleigh, N. C. 



102 The St. Mary's Muse. 



* 



'Mason, Mrs. John T. (Nellie Jackson, '69-70) Baltimore, Md. 

*Meares, Miss Harriet E Ridgeway, S. C. 

*Meares, Miss Kate deR., '03 Wilmington, N. C. 

Meares, Mrs. Gaston (Kate deRosset) Wilmington, N. C. 

Mebane, Mrs. Frank (Alice Collins) New Brighton, N. Y. 

Mewborn, Miss Carlotta Kinston, N. C. 

Miller, Miss Anne Ware Mission Home, Va. 

Miller, Miss Lucy P Goldsboro, N. C. 

*Miller, Mrs. R. B Goldsboro, N. C. 

Mitchell, Mrs. Carrie Carr Asheville, N. C. 

Mitchell, Mrs. Thos. J. (Sallie Scales) New Bern, N. C. 

Moore, Miss Annie Peyre Sumter, S. C. 

* Moore, Miss Carrie Helen, '04 Littleton, N. C. 

Moore, Mrs. Maurice (Charlotte Allston, '92) Union, S. C. 

Moore, Mrs. W. Paul (Ellen Douglass Lewis) Jackson, N. C. 

* Morrow, Mrs. Fannie J Fayetteville, N. C. 

Munds, Miss Columbia, '96 Wilmington, N. C. 

Munnerlyn, Miss Alice Jacksonville, Fla. 

Murchison, Miss Lucile W Wilmington, N. C. 

*Murray, Mrs. Hugh H. (Kate Connor, '99) Wilson, N. C. 

McGehee, Mrs. Geo. B. (Eliza Skinner, *80-'85) Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Mcintosh, Mrs. Spalding (Mary Sprague) Canton, N. C. 

*McKethan, Mrs. C. K. ( Ellen Underwood ) Fayetteville, N. C. 

McLendon, Mrs. H. H. (Margie Lockhart) Wadesboro, N. C. 

*MacMillan, Mrs. W. D., Jr. (Kate deRosset) Wilmington, N. C. 

McRee, Mrs. J. I. (Helen Blair Johnson) Richmond, Va. 

*McVea, Miss Emilie W., '84 Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Nash, Mrs. H. K. (Carrie Norfleet) Wilmington, N. C. 

Nash, Mrs. Mary McKinlay Pensacola, Fla. 

Norfleet, Miss Annie Roxobel, N. C. 

Nottingham, Mrs. S. Thos. ( Lucy T. Redwood, '04 ) Chesapeake, Va. 

Oates, Mrs. C. H Hendersonville, N. C. 

O'Neill, Mrs. Maurice J. (Laura Newsom, '94) Henderson, N. C. 

Osborne, Miss Josephine S., '99 Charlotte, N. C. 

Ottley, Miss Passie May Atlanta, Ga. 

Page, Miss Mary A., '94 Raleigh, N. C. 

Palmer, Mrs. E. H. (Irving Morgan) Charleston, S. C. 

Patterson, Miss Bessie D Nyack, N. Y. 

Pearson, Mrs. W. H. (Claudia Holt) Morganton, N. C. 

Pemberton, Mrs. Bessie Underwood Fayetteville, N. C. 

Pendleton, Mrs. A. S. (Eliza Busbee) Henderson, N. C. 

Penniman, Mrs. Gardiner B. (Mary Johnstone) Quogue, N. Y. 

Pennington, Miss Margaret Cordon Tarboro, N. C. 

Pescud, Miss Belle W., '97 Raleigh, N. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 103 

Pippen, Mrs. Joseph ( Sallie Moore Leach) Littleton, X. C. 

Powe, Mrs. Edward K. (Claudia Erwin) West Durham, X. C. 

Powell, Mrs. Woodson Lee (Mary Peter Hill) Pittsboro, X. C. 

"Pruden, Mrs. W. D. (Annie Wood) Edenton, X. C. 

Raney, Mrs. Chas. W. (Sallie Kittrell i Louisburg, X. O. 

Robards, Mrs. W. J. (Annie Andrews) Henderson, X. C. 

*Robards, Mrs. W. W. (Sadie Root, '98) Raleigh, X. C. 

Roberts, Mrs. G. H. ( Hannah Jarvis ) Xew Bern, X. C. 

Robertson, Mrs. Annie Iredell (Jones) Columbia, S. C. 

*Robinson, Miss Eloise Elizabeth City, X. C. 

Robinson, Mrs. Jos. X. (Ada Humphrey) Goldsboro, X. C. 

*Root, Miss Annie G., '03 Raleigh, X. 0. 

*Royster, Miss Gertrude, '93 Raleigh, X. C. 

Royster, Mrs. 0. M. (Pattie Mallett ) Hickory, X. C. 

Sass, Miss Mary E Charleston, S. C. 

Sabiston, Miss Leila May Jacksonville, X. C. 

Saunders, Mrs. W. J. ( Jacquelin Bacot) Birmingham, Ala. 

Schlesinger, Mrs. May Lee San Francisco, Cal. 

Settle, Mrs. Thos. (Eliza Rotter) Asheville, X. C. 

Shepard, Miss Mary B Xew Bern, X. C. 

Shields, Mrs. R. W. (Rebe Smith) Scotland Xeck, X. C. 

Simmons, Mrs. Dennis W. (Laura Mann) Elizabeth City, X. C. 

*Simpson, Miss Annie R Rocky Mount, X. C. 

Simpson, Mrs. R. B. (Margaret Connor) Wilson, X. C. 

Smedes, Mrs. E. Bancker (Lillie S. Hicks, '91) Boonton, X. J. 

Smedes, Miss Henrietta R., '87 Washington, D. C. 

Smedes, Miss Luella Vicksburg, Miss. 

Smedes, Miss Mary C Cade, La. 

Smith, Miss Adelaide E Scotland Xeck, X. C. 

Smith, Miss Irene A Williamston, X. C. 

*Smith, Mrs. John R. (L. Ophelia Howard, '57-'58) Goldsboro, X. C. 

Snowden, Mrs. P. G. (Lilla Snowden) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Speight, Mrs. Seth E. (Alice Barlow) Tarboro, X. C. 

Spruill, Mrs. Frank S. (Alice Winston) Rocky Mount, X. C. 

Spruill, Miss Mary James, '07 Littleton. X. C. 

Starrett, Mrs. J. M. (Mary W. Powe) Knoxville, Tenn. 

*Stedman, Miss Margaret Gray, '04 Raleigh, X. C. 

Stein, Miss Bertha, '96 Raleigh, X. C. 

Sumter, Miss Beatrice Sumter. S. C. 

Taliaferro, Miss Lula T Charlotte, N. C. 

Tankard, Miss Mary Washington, X. C. 

Taylor, Miss Lena Townesville, X. C. 

Temple, Mrs. W. O Denver, Colo. 

Thiem, Mrs. LeRoy ( Xina Green, '99 ) Raleigh, X. C. 



104 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Thomas, Mrs. Tkos. ( Rosa Gordon ) Beaufort, N. C. 

Thompson, Miss Marguerite V., '08 Baltimore, Md. 

Thorn, Miss Marie Kingstree, S. C. 

Thurmond, Miss Sophia D., '85 Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Trapier, Miss Jennie D., '02 Monteagle, Tenn. 

*Tucker, Miss Julia Henderson, N. C. 

Turlington, Mrs. Ira ( Hortense Rose, '82-'83 ) Smithfield, N. C. 

*Waddell, Mrs. Alfred M. (Gabrielle deRosset, '80) Wilmington, N. C. 

Waddill, Miss Elizabeth T., '08 Cheraw, S. C. 

Walker, Mrs. Adele Martiniere Columbus, Ga. 

Walker, Miss Elise H Baltimore, Md. 

Walker, Mrs. Lewis Milton, N. C. 

Walker, Mrs. Lucian H. (Annie S. Jones) Roanoke, Va. 

Wall, Mrs. W. L. (Annie Collins, '80 ) Durham, N. C. 

Walton, Miss H. Louise Morganton, N. C. 

*Walton, Miss Lola E Morganton, N. C. 

Ward, Miss Grace Martin Franklinton, N. C. 

Washington, Mrs. J. A. (Virginia Pope) Goldsboro, N. C. 

Watters, Mrs. J. S. (Kate M. Lord) Charlotte, N. C. 

Webb, Mrs. Joseph Hillsboro, N. C. 

Webb, Mrs. Norfleet (Annie Peebles) Hillsboro, N. C. 

Weeks, Miss Evelyn S Weeksville, N. C. 

Welles, Miss Mary S Towanda, Pa. 

Whitaker, Miss Bessie Lewis, '93 Birmingham, Ala. 

White, Mrs. Robb ( Placide Bridgers ) Bagnio, P. I. 

Wilkinson, Mrs. T. F. (Mary Sturgeon ) Cary, N. C. 

Willcox, Mrs. P. A. (Marie Brunson, '02) Florence, S. C. 

Williams, Miss Elnora S Henderson, N. C. 

Williams, Miss Kate M Florence, S. C. 

Wilson, Mrs. Frank L. (Annie S. Love, '00) Raleigh, N. C. 

Wilson, Miss Susan R., '56-'57 Charleston, S. C. 

Windley, Miss Bettie D Baltimore, Md. 

Winslow, Miss Mae Wood, '03 Hertford, N. C. 

*Witherington, Mrs. B. B. (Annie D. Hicks) Faison, N. C. 

Withers, Mrs. W. A. (Jane Pescud, '92 ) Raleigh, N. C. 

*Wood, Miss Annie Caroline Edenton, N. C. 

Wood, Mrs. Frank (Rebecca Collins, '82) Edenton, N. C. 

Wood, Mrs. Edward (Pattie Martin) Edenton, N. C. 

Wood, Mrs. H. G. (Mary Philips, '90) Edenton, N. C. 

Wood, Mrs. Julien (Elizabeth Badham, '89) Edenton, N. C. 

Wood, Miss Sophie M Edenton, N. C. 

*Wootten, Miss Lucy O Wilmington, N. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 105 

The School Officers. 

Rev. George W. Lay Rector. 

Miss Eleanor W. Thomas Lady Principal. 

Mr. Ernest Cruikshank Secretary and Business Manager. 

Miss Martha A. Dowd Director of Music. 

Miss Clara Fenner Director of Art. 

Miss Muriel Victor Director of Elocution. 

Miss Lizzie H. Lee Director of Business Department. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Mrs. Mary Iredell. Raleigh Honorary President. 

Mrs. Kate deR. Meares, Wilmington, ) TT TT . — ., . 

° I Honorary V ice-Presidents. 

Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh, 



} 



Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp, Raleigh President. 

Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham Vice-President. 

Miss Kate McKimmox, St. Mary's Secretary. 

Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh Treasurer. 

Miss Mary F. Henderson. Salisbury Field Secretary. 

Alumnae Council. 
The President, ex officio. Chairman. 
The Vice-president, ex officio. 
The Secretary, ex officio. 
The Treasurer, ex officio. 
Mrs. A. W. Knox, Raleigh {until 1913). 
Miss Annie Root, Raleigh (until 1913). 
Miss Mary Henderson, Salisbury (until 1912). 
Mrs. Albert L. Cox, Raleigh (until 1912). 
Miss Florence W. Slater, New York (until 1911). 
Mrs. R. W. Winston, Raleigh (until 1911). 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1910-1911. 

Xell Battle Lewis, Editor-in-Chief. 

Bessie Smedes Erwin. Caroline Clarke Jones. Jane Ruffin Sims. 

Elizabeth Byrd Henderson. Josephine Tonnoffski. 

Elizabeth Hughes. Isabelle Hester Perry. Rebecca Bennehan Wood. 

Elizabeth Woodard Leary, Business Manager. 
Amelia Pinckney Sturgeon, Asst. Bus. Mgr. 



REfJD !— MfIRK, !— 0CT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



"It's worth the difference " 



WHARTON & TYREE 



" Workers in Artistic Photography" 



The Muse is the official organ of the Alumna 3 , adopted 
by the Association, May, 1910. 

If the Alumnse would more freely write to the Muse, the 
Muse could give better Alumnge news. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF AU, KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES MP SLIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

THIRD GENERATION OF SUCCESSFUL 
BANKING. 

All patrons treated with every courtesy. 
New accounts solicited. Safe Deposit Boxes 
for rent. Fire aDd Burglar Proof Vault. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 
F. H. Briggs, Cashier. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

Jolly &• Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 




St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 

EOYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 

Hunter Bros. & Brewer Company 

Dry Goods, Notions and Shoes 

210 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 



St. Mary's Sofa Pillows, 
St. Mary's Seal Stationery, 
St. Mary's Seal Pins, 
St. Mary's Pennants, 
St. Mary's Calendars, 
May be had by writing to The Muse. 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 


HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 

Ladies' Fine Shoes. 


Dr. L. D. CASTLEBURY 
Dentist 


WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 


AYCOCK & WINSTON 

Attorneys at Law 

raleigh, n. c. 


JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE." 


ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 


Dr. V. E. TURNER, 

Dentist. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
Millinery. 


GRIMES & VASS, Raleigh, N. C 
Fire Insurance and Investments. 


J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 

Best of everything in our line. 

222 Fayetteville Street. 



Advertisements. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU 

RALEIGH, N". C. 

Invites correspondence with teachers open to en- 
gagement and with school officers seeking com- 
petent teachers. NO CHARGE TO SCHOOL 
OFFICERS. Full particulars free. 

CHAS. J. PARKER, Manager 




MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 
OF KALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital $100,000.00 4 per cent paid in Savings 

Department 
E. C. Duncan, Pres. W. B. Drake, Jr., Cash. 



A. H. FETTING 

Manufacturer of Greek Letter Fraternity 

Jewelry, 213 N. Liberty St., Baltimore, Md. 

Factory: 213 Little Sharp St. 

4®" Memorandum package sent to any fraternity 
member through the Secretary of Chapter. Special 
designs and estimates furnished on class pins, rings, 
medals for athletic meets, etc. 



HIRSHBERG ART COMPANY 

Art and Drawing Supplies, Frames, Prints, etc. 

418 N. Howard St., Baltimore, Md. 

The Yarborough House 

invites your patronage 



The School authorities will be glad to mail on request the current St. 

Mary's Bulletins, with full information about the School. 

Bulletin 18, General Information (Catalogue). July, 1910. 

Bulletin 14, Academic Position of St. Mary's. 

Bulletin 15, Academic Courses and Announcements. October, 1909. 

Bulletin 16 ? Scholarships. March, 1910. 

Bulletin 17, Miss McVea's Address. May, 1910. 

Bulletin 19, Alumnae Constitution, etc. September, 1910. 

Bulletin 20, Annual Awards and Records. November, 1910. 



K I N'G 'S GROCERY, 

"The Little Store." 


SEND TO 

Plummer's Stables 

For Riding and Driving Horses 


E. M. UZZELL & CO., 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers Steam and Gas Fitters. 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited. 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 


S. Wilmington Street 


CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 
Fayetteville Street. 


RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. Pullen- 
Pres., Chas. Root, Cash'r. Capital and Surplus 
S75,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO 

The WELL-KNOWN WASHINGTON MANUFACTURING 

JEWELER AND SILVERSMITH, WILL 

MOVE INTO HIS NEW BUILDING. 926 F ST.. N. W. 

ABOUT MARCH TWENTY-FIRST 

INSURE IN THE 

Jefferson Standard Life Ins. Go. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Strongest in the South 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

at j. l. o'quinn & co. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY. 

ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW 

Ladies' Furnishings and Novelties. 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

5 West Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy— China. 

Pictures. Stationery. Toys. 



ONE DOLLAR pays for the Muse for a year (ten numbers). 

Send the Dollar NOW. 



CALL 

FREEMAN'S STABLES 

When You Want a Good Saddle 
Horse, or a Good Horse and Buggy 

Both Phones 


J. SCHWARTZ. 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE CO. 

51 and 53 Franklin Street 

CHICAGO 

Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 


ROBT. SIMPSON DRU pSriptionist 


Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 


Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 


H. T. HICKS CO. 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

EALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



POOL & CROCKER 

up-to-date 
FOOTWEAR 

Special Attention to Fit 

105 Fayetteville St. 



KIN G-CRO WELL'S DRUG STORE 



AND SODA FOUNTAIN 



Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, H. W. JACKSON, 

President. Treasurer. 

G. H. DORTCH, Secretary. 



Sample copies of the Muse will be mailed 
to Alumnse at any time on request. 



Dr. L. J. PEGRAM 

DENTIST 
Office 209% Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. C. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
College Postals 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowel! 



M. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 



GROCERS 



WILMINGTON <fe HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGH1 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEIN METZ, 

FLORIST 
Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113. 



T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 
Repairing promptly done. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 



Eat Berts' Ice Cream 



NORFOLK -SO UTH ERN RAILWAY 

New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

Express train service between Raleigh, Wilson, Greenville, Goldsboro, Kinston, 

New Bern, Morehead City, Washington, Plymouth, Elizabeth City, 

Virginia Beach and Norfolk, Virginia. 



VIA NORFOLK TO NORTH AND EAST 
VIA RALEIGH TO SOUTH AND WEST 

6 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women). 



69tb ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 15, 1910. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 26, 1911. 



St. Mary's 

offers instruction in these 

Departments: J £ THE ART SCHOOL. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 
S. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1910-11 are enrolled 225 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faoulty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-sis 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector. 






fhwember, w\o 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

HALLOWE'EN NUMBER. 

Vol. XV. November, 1910. No. 4 

Hallowe'en. 

Hallowe'en ! There comes the thought of witches and elves and bril- 
liant autumn leaves and pumpkin lanterns, grinning at the thought of 
their own ugliness, and apples, very red. That is the time when those 
of us who are still children enough to believe in fairies are glad of the 
belief. It is good to think that somewhere under the clear, crisp stars 
the witches are a-riding, and that somewhere in the moonlit woods the 
gay elves dance. 

The afternoon before Hallowe'en was a very busy one. Everywhere 
girls sewed or crimped paper or painted busily, or did some other of 
the thousand and one things that must be done before the costume can 
be finished. And then, when the dressing-up began, what a hurrying 
and scurrying and a little fussing too, on the side. For it is provoking 
when you — a would-be "pirate bold" — find that your room-mate has 
very carelessly used your "whiskers" as a fringe for her Indian cos- 
tumes. But when the "big bell" rang things straightened themselves 
out somehow and a very motley throng crowded into the schoolroom 
to form in line for the "Grand March." Everybody was laughing and 
whispering and wondering "who in the world is that ?" 

Ah ! The first note of the grand march sounds ; the "little children" 

giggle and scamper ahead, and the procession starts. It circled round 

and round the parlor with slow and solemn tread, while the Jack-O'- 

Lanterns blinked from among the leaves. A very strange procession it 

was — ghosts and witches and clowns and nuns and gypsies, and many 

other strange and fanciful characters composed it. Then the lights were 

turned on, and the dancing began. To be sure there was quite a little 

jostling and treading on toes, but who cared ? And so the fun went on. 
******* 

Half-past nine ! A discordant bell, a groan from many throats, and 



108 The St. Mary's Muse. 

the Indian whose war paint is slightly smeared puts an arm around 
the little girl with disheveled hair, whose sash is awry, and they go 
slowly upstairs ; and the convict kisses the witch good-night. 

And so it ends. 1ST. B. L. 



Amabel. 



REBECCA BENNEHAN WOOD. 



Amabel was dead, beautiful Amabel of the flaxen hair and the big, 
brown eyes that really, truly went to sleep. 

"Dead ! Dead ! Dead !" wailed Anne, as she rocked tearfully back 
and forth on the grass at the foot of the apple tree. 

"Dead ! Dead ! Dead !" The wail gradually softened to a 

moan, and finally ceased altogether as she picked the doll up from the 
spot where she had lain ever since her sudden and disastrous descent 
from the apple tree, and tried to fit the severed head upon the jagged 
remains of the neck. The effort was vain. Amabel was dead for 
good and all. 

As the child looked at the doll's shattered nose a quick sob rose in 
her throat, for there came to her a sudden recollection of how radiantly 
beautiful Amabel had been when she first beheld her, arrayed in a pink 
silk dress and pink shoes and stockings, hanging from the topmost 
bough of the Christmas tree. "Daddy" had taken her down and put 
her into the little girl's arms, and from that moment the two had never 
been separated day or night, except when Amabel had been sent to 
the hospital. 

The real cause of her going to the hospital had been that her little 
mother had burned off her beautiful raven hair in trying to curl it 
with "sister's" tongs, but that little mother had had a vivid imagina- 
nation, so she "p'tended that Amabel had been opewated on for a tew- 
wible case of 'pendicitis," and she held to her make-belief in spite of 
the teasing of her big brother, who declared that he had never heard 
of an operation for appendicitis changing anybody's hair from black to 
what he insultingly called "yaller." 

Anne remembered another time when she had thought that Amabel 



The St. Mary's Muse. 109 

would have to go to the hospital. That was when she had taken her 
wading in Auntie's brook and the china legs had come unglued from 
the kid body. She had thought of the nicest disease for Amabel to 
have, with a long roily, wiggly name to it, but her brother had destroyed 
her plans by gluing the dismembered body together again. 

The little girl sighed deeply. She and Amabel had had so many 
good times together. There was the time when she had given a party 
and Amabel had sat at the head of the table in Anne's lap and helped 
pour the tea. Then there was the time they went on the picnic, Easter 
Monday, and the time — , but if Anne started to remember all the 
"times" in Amabel's eventful career of six months it would take the 
whole day. 

The tears rose again in the child's eyes as she suddenly realized that 
those good times were gone forever, but before even one tear could 
roll down her fat little cheek another idea had entered her head, and, 
scrambling to her feet, she had picked up the battered remains of 
Amabel and was pattering across the yard toward the house. If 
Amabel couldn't ever be alive again (and Anne had never heard of 
hospitals that could mend smashed noses or sew on china heads) she 
should certainly have the very nicest funeral a doll ever had, and 
Anne's very best tin box for a coffin. 



A Glimpse of Guatemala. 



MART HANCOCK OWES. 



The landing at the port of San Jose, Guatemala, is certainly excit- 
ing. Your steamer drops anchor far out in the bay and you are 
brought to land in a tiny boat, and then hoisted up from the tiny boat 
to the high pier in a basket. But if you are a real person with any 
life at all, you forget about the tiresome trip, and the rickety landing 
when you get to Guatemala city. 

Guatemala city ! You love it the moment you see it, the little, nar- 
row streets, the different colored houses with their barred windows, 
the Indians, the Plaza, the red and gold soldiers, and the beautiful 



110 The St. Mary's Muse. 

senoritas. There every one speaks Spanish, and it does sound funny, 
but so soft and beautiful. 

Then, that night, if you are not too tired from your day's outing, 
you go to the Plaza, or park, to hear the band play and see the seno- 
ritas again. If you are a boy and happen to be lucky enough to meet 
one of them, you bow very low, and say (in Spanish, of course), "Your 
humble servant who throws himself at your feet" (and very pretty 
little feet they are, too, in their ridiculously high-heeled slippers). 
Strange to say, the senorita, thus addressed, does not seem at all sur- 
prised, and not especially complimented, as an American girl might at 
this seemingly extravagant greeting, but acts as if she is accustomed to 
having men throw themselves at her feet by the hundred, as she prob- 
ably is. If you are a girl you shake hands with the senorita, and kiss 
her at the same time. This, at first, seems strange, as you only know 
her slightly. 

On your way home from the Plaza you are surprised to see, at 
almost every house, a living representation of "Romeo and Juliet" — 
the boys standing beneath the high-barred windows talking to the girls 
on the inside ; and you are still more surprised when you learn that it 
is absolutely against all rules of etiquette for the boys to go indoors, 
but they must stand outside and talk through a barred window or not 
talk at all. You think that never in this world could you get accus- 
tomed or reconciled to such an awful state of affairs. 

Just before you reach your lodgings you pass another "Romeo" 
strumming on a guitar, and singing softly, and it all seems very pic- 
turesque and far away — like a glimpse into a "story-book land." 



Recollections of a Short Life. 



TINSLEY HARRISON. 



Even in the firelight one could see as they watched her dreaming 
there, that sorrow had left its mark on that lovely mother face. Yet 
mingled with the lines of sadness was the calm content that comes only 
after a brave struggle. 

She was quite alone to-night, otherwise she would not have let her- 



The St. Mary's Muse. Ill 

self think of the long ago, of the time when that little life, so insep- 
arably bound to her own, had been taken away. An angel, taken by 
the angels, she believed. For during that last hour, as she sat by the 
sufferer's bedside, she thought she heard the angels softly singing, and, 
looking at the flushed face on the pillow, saw that all traces of pain had 
disappeared and that a smile was on the lips, so contented, so pure, 
that it could have been none other than an angel's smile. 

To-night that scene came back to the mother, and then a still more 
distant one. She thought of the day that she left her family and 
friends for the one man whom she loved, of the three short years, and 
then of his death ; of how with that death her soul seemed dead ; she 
loved no fellow being, she believed in no God. For a year all mother's 
duties were forgotten ; the frail flower by her side was heeded little. 
But then the slumbering mother love awoke, all the more passionate 
for its sleep. Through the child she lived once more, ever struggling 
to gain greater faith and purity. 

Five brief years of sunshine passed in the gloomy home, sunshine 
without one cloud. The beautiful little child restoring interest, peace, 
joy, and an endless faith to the mother. But then there came a day 
when a brief life's work was finished, the little one heard the angels' 
song and joined that bright host, leaving the mother alone. But yet — 
to her, the child had given faith, and in that faith she lived. 

So it was that as the mother sat alone before the fire, dreaming of 
the past, one saw in her face a certain sadness and yet a perfect peace, 
for she was content to wait until she, too, could join the unseen multi- 
tude of Heaven. 



112 The St. Mary's Muse. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



Elizabeth Hughes and Caroline Jones, Editors. 



The Fair. 
The Fair has been the great event of interest that all of us, espe- 
cially the new girls, have been anticipating ever since school began. 
At last it has come — and gone. We were quite willing to go to school 
on Monday, so that we could have the two holidays ( ?) Wednesday and 
Thursday. Many relatives and friends were here, and, altogether, 
everybody had a jolly good time, even those who didn't care to go to the 
grounds. Those who took an interest in the real purpose of the Fair 
found the exhibits were well worth their inspection, especially the ex- 
hibit of the Art Department of St. Mary's and "George Lay's Butter- 
flies," as everybody called the splendid collection of insects that George 
Lay had on exhibition. Many of the shows, such as the "Flea Circus" 
and the "Little Russian Prince," the "Ole Virginia Plantation," and the 
animal shows, were well patronized by our girls. But, oh, the charms 
of the Ferris Wheel, the deliciousness of the ice cream cones, the wild 
excitement of "gambling" for a poodle — "words are inadequate." We 
had a "grand" time, and are glad that we'll have some past excitement 
to think about, until the Christmas holidays draw nearer. 

Mr. Stone's Tea. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stone entertained some of the girls most charmingly 
Monday afternoon, October tenth. Those who were so fortunate 
as to be included in this had a most wonderful time. The girls, 
sitting before a grand, big fire, were entertained with wintry stories 
and raggy ragtime. Mrs. Stone served delightful refreshments, which 
were greatly enjoyed. Those who were included in this little after- 
noon party, and who enjoyed Mr. and Mrs. Stone's hospitality, were: 
Misses Lucy Harrison, Julia Cooper, Sophronia Cooper, Helen Robin- 
son, Rebecca Wood, Frances Fitchett, Janie Sims, Brent Blackmer, 
Elizabeth Leary, Willie Williams, Mary Gibbes Mitchell, ISTadie West- 
ervelt, Beverly Du Bose, Kathryn Lassiter, Margaret Hoppe, Nannie 
Shields, and Helen McArthur. H. McA. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 113 

Mrs. Busbee's Party. 
On the afternoon of Monday, October the third, Mrs. R. S. Busbee 
charmingly entertained in honor of the Charlotte girls, Caroline Jones, 
Marie Thomas and Laura Griffith. Those who enjoyed Mrs. Busbee's 
hospitality were : Joanna Rogers, Bessie Arthur, Katherine Smith, 
Julia Borden, Ruth Wells, Marie Thomas, Laura Griffith, and Caro- 
line Jones. 

Junior Auxiliary. 

On Sunday night, the ninth of October, a meeting of all the Chap- 
ters of the Junior Auxiliary was held in the schoolroom. Miss Katie 
explained to the new girls what was meant by the Junior Auxiliary, and 
told them the names of the different Chapters at St. Mary's. Each 
Chapter then repaired to a separate classroom, where the directresses 
were elected. They are as follows : 

St. Monica's Chapter Miss McKimmon. 

St. Anne's Chapter Miss Sutton. 

St. Agnes' Chapter Miss Urquhart. 

St. Catherine's Chapter Miss Thomas. 

St. Elizabeth's Chapter Miss Buxton. 

St. Margaret's Chapter Miss Victor. 

Lucy Bratton Chapter Miss Hill. 

faculty Recital. 

On Monday evening, October tenth, the second of the series of 
Faculty Recitals was held in the auditorium. This concert was given 
by the members of the Music Faculty, assisted by Miss Victor, Reader. 
We reprint the account of it as given by the News and Observer: 

"The concert at St. Mary's last evening was heard by a large audi- 
ence, which greatly enjoyed the interesting program. 

"The opening number, 'From the Carnival,' was given by Miss Ella 
Dorroh with fine touch and good rhythm, and with true appreciation 
of the Grieg spirit. 

"Miss Susie Battle played the Reinecke Ballade in A Flat with 
grace, delicacy and refinement of interpretation, the pianissimo pas- 
sages being particularly effective. The 'Adagio' and 'Finale' from 
the Burch concerto were given by Miss Sherwin with reposeful and 



114 The St. Mary's Muse. 

noble interpretation, with her usual beautiful tone and technical 
facility. 

" 'The Coming Out of Miss Comings/ a reading by Miss Muriel 
Victor, was a marked success. Miss Victor has a charming voice with 
keen dramatic instinct and poise of expression, and her reading of the 
selection was very pleasing. The Chopin 'Bolero' was played by Miss 
Scheper with excellent taste and technique and full mastery of this 
spirited number. 

"The joyousness of the 'Song of Sunshine' was delightfully given by 
Miss Zulette Wilson, who has a splendid voice of wide range and sym- 
pathy. The program ended with a 'Gypsy Dance' from Paderewski's 
opera, 'Manen,' and a Mazurka of Chopin played by Mr. R. Blinn 
Owen with brilliancy and musicianly feeling." 

Athletics. 

At recent meetings the Sigma and Mu Athletic Clubs elected the 
following officers : 

Sigma. Mu. 

Virginia Prettyman President Amelia Sturgeon 

Joanna Rogers Capt. Tennis Amelia Sturgeon 

Virginia Prettyman Capt. Basketball Jessica Vann 

Miss Urquhart is the Faculty Directress of the Sigma Club, Miss 
Buxton of the Mu, while Miss Wilson is supervisor of both tennis 
clubs. Jessica Vann was elected Treasurer of the entire Athletic As- 
sociation, and it is needless to say that the election of Tinsley Harri- 
son as .President was unanimously approved by all. 

Epsilon Alpha Pi Reception. 

On the evening of October 15th the E A n Literary Society gave its 
annual reception to its new members. Among the guests were Mr. 
Lay, Miss Thomas, and other members of the Faculty, and the officers 
of the 2 A Literary Society. In the receiving line were the officers of 
E A n, Nell Lewis, Rebecca Wood, Elizabeth Leary, Virginia Pretty- 
man, Bessie Erwin, Margaret Erwin, Kathryn Parker and Ruth Wells. 
The parlor was beautifully decorated in autumn leaves and golden 
rod. At each end of the room were punch tables, presided over by 
Katharine Smith, Katharine Small, Mary Owen and Nellie Hendricks. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 115 

Refreshments were served during the best part of the evening, and at 
the close Miss Wilson very kindly sang. V. P. 

Muse Sale. 
The annual Muse Sale was held this year in the Muse Room. 
Here all the old pictures and posters were auctioned off. Elizabeth 
Leary made an excellent, auctioneer and everybody enjoyed herself 
thoroughly trying to "bid over" her neighbor. All came away think- 
ing they had gotten the biggest bargain of the clay, and were well 

satisfied. 

Sigma Lambda Reception. 

On Saturday evening, October 1st, the 2 A reception was held in 
the parlor of the school. This reception is given each year by the 
old girls of the society to the new members. The doors were thrown 
open at eight o'clock, and the guests were received by the officers of 
the society. The room was very beautifully decorated with wild 
flowers and autumn leaves. There were two punch bowls in two cor- 
ners of the room, and here delicious punch was served by Catherine 
Hawkins, Ruth Critz, Tinsley Harrison and Caroline Jones. After 
all the guests had arrived, Miss Victor added greatly to the pleasure 
of the evening by reciting several pieces. The reception lasted from 
eight till nine and was a great success. 



School Gossip. 



— We extend a hearty welcome to Master "Octavius" Lay, who has 
recently arrived in our midst. We hope his visit will prove a pleasant 
one. 

— Martha Byrd Spruill spent a few days at the school visiting friends. 

— We are glad to say that Julia Williams and Beatrice Barton, both 
of whom were operated on for appendicitis, are improving rapidly. 

— Mary Henderson, '03, who at the last meeting of the alumna? associ- 
ation was chosen Chapter Inspector, spent a few days at the school before 
beginning her tour of inspection. 

— Sophie Waters paid a short visit to her friends at the school. 

— Members of the Faculty have been indulging in outside gaieties 
2 



116 The St. Mary's Muse. 

this month. They attended the reception of Mrs. Shipp and Mrs. 
Knox, and, from all accounts, both must have been very enjoyable. 

— Mr. Lay, as we all know, is interested in everything that pertains 
to modern improvement, and attended the Conservation Convention in 
Atlanta. There he met with great cordiality from the parents of the 
Atlanta girls and other friends. His account of the trip is printed 
in this number of the Muse. 

— "Miss Katie" has our deepest sympathy in her recent sorrow. 
She has had to be in Fayetteville twice since the death of her nephew, 
but we are glad to have her with us again. 

— Mr. George Wood came down from the University during the 
Fair to see Rebecca, and Mr. Bennett Perry also took advantage of 
Fair week to come to see his sister, Isabelle. 

— Mr. Cruikshank was away for a week the last of September at- 
tending his sister's wedding. He also went up to New York for a 
day or two. We were all glad to see him back, especially his chemistry 
class. ( ?) 

— Margaret Hoppe had as her guest for Wednesday and Thursday 
of Fair week Miss Margaret McGary, of Durham. 

— All of the old girls were glad to see Helen Slocomb, Eliza Pender, 
Blair Rawlings and Alice Hines up for the Fair. 

— Mrs. E. A. Btencini and Mrs. R. E. Bencini spent Wednesday and 
Thursday of Fair week with Robah. 

— Edith Bradshaw's mother and sister were here during the Fair. 
— Mrs. John Huttenhauer was here from her home in Southern Pines 
on Thursday of Fair week to see her daughter, Virginia. 

— Those who were fortunate enough to have parents here for the 
Fair were: Martha and Helen Wright, Emilie Harriot, Eva Vaughn, 
Louise Josey, Marie Thomas, Nan Cuthbert, Elise Lloyd, Meta Mew- 
born, and Mary Tyson. 

— Miss Mildred Smith was here during Fair week visiting her sis- 
ter, Eliza. She is very pleasantly remembered as an old St. Mary's 
girl. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 117 



Timely Topics. 



After the Fair. 

(AFTER TENNYSON.) 

Broke, broke, broke! 

That's the state of the case with me; 
And I would that I my coin had spent 

Not quite so lavishly. 

Oh, 'tis well for the fakir to fake 

And pocket the coins with a grin; 
Oh, 'tis well for the showman to boast 

And rope all the credulous in. 

But the pleasant ice cream man 

Has most of the pelf, I ween, 
And it's oh for the sight of my hard-earned cash 

One glimpse of the lost "long green." 

Broke, broke, broke, 

I moan in deep despair. 
But 'tis only what one might expect 

From a day at the "Great State Fair." L. 

I-Jallowe'en. 
11:00 A. M. 
She's just a plain St. Mary's girl, 

A dainty little maid, 
Who hates to get the fatal "slip" 
And loves a serenade. 

8:30 P. M. 

But now she is a powdered dame 

With gems and rare old lace, 
Whose sweeping train is managed 

With dexterity and grace. 

Or now she is a fearful "spook," 

Who moves in solemn gloom ; 
And now an old and wrinkled witch, 

A-riding on a broom. 

With clumping sabots now she comes, 
A Dutch girl "just too cute"; 
Nor does she fear the Indian brave 
That's in such hot pursuit. 



118 The St. Mary's Muse. 

She turns now to the happy days 
Of childhood, free from care; 

A little girl, with flowing curls, 
She hugs her Teddy Bear. 

Now quite demure she "tells her beads," 
And counts them one by one; 

Absorbed in meditation deep, 
A sweet and pious nun. 

She now appears a Puritan, 
In simplest fashion dressed; 

And now, with clanking spurs, she comes 
Straight from the "wild, wild West." 

And now a sporty college chap 
With trousers rolled just right, 

And now a little "nigger gal" 
With "pig-tails" plaited tight. 

10:00 P. M. 

Oh yes, she can be all these things, 

But at the stroke of ten 
You'll see, if you're observant, 

Just the same sweet girl again. 



Nell Battle Lewis. 



Memory Verses. 

TWO RHYMES OF THE PRESIDENTS. 

A noble list — George Washington; 
John Adams; Thomas Jefferson; 
James Madison; and James Monroe; 
John Quincy Adams; and below 
Comes Andrew Jackson in his turn; 
Martin VanBuren next we learn; 
Then William Henry Harrison. 
And soon John Tyler followed on; 
Then, after Tyler, James Knox Polk; 
Next Zachary Taylor ruled the folk 
Till death; then Millard Fillmore came; 
And Franklin Pierce we next must name. 
James Buchanan then appears; 
And Abraham Lincoln through those years 
Of war; and when his life was lost, 
Then Andrew Johnson ruled the host. 
Next U. S. Grant; and R. B. Hayes; 
And James A. Garfield each had place; 
Then Chester Arthur; and the rhyme 



The St. Mart's Muse. 119 

Goes on to Grover Cleveland's time. 
One term of Benjamin Harrison; 
And Cleveland again came on; 
Next William McKinley took command; 
Then Theodore Roosevelt ruled the land. 
Now twenty-seventh and last we have 
To write down William Howard Taft. 

Semper primus Washington ; 

Then atrabilious, Adams, John; 

Next "Declaration" Jefferson ; 

Then "Federalist" James Madison; 

And then "Doctrinal" James Monroe; 

Next "J. Q.," "Old Man Eloquent"; 

Grim Jackson next, or friend or foe; 

Then "Matty Van," to whom was lent 

Wornout "Old Hickory's" term the third; 

One month of Harrison, "Old Tip"' ; 

Then nigh four years of Tyler's "grip" ; 

Polk's "War for Texas" then occurred; 

Whence "Rough and Ready" Taylor came; 

"Zack" dying, Millard Fillmore's name 

Looms up; next Pierce; and then Buchanan and 

His reprobated "Rope of sand." 

Then Abraham Lincoln — semper second — 

To fiery foeman fatal reckoned ; 

Then "Andy" Johnson luckless nested, 

With Reconstruction vainly wrestled. 

Next the regime of U. S. Grant 

Through two terms of grudged praise we chant; 

Then without dint of blame or praise 

The unelected R. B. Hayes; 

Next Garfield, murdered by Guiteau ; 

Then C. A. Arthur's "years of woe." 

S. Grover Cleveland once — and then, 

After "Ben" Harrison, again. 

McKinley slain by murderous hand, 

The strenuous Roosevelt took command; 

And now in this, the present hour, 

Taft "the judicial" is in power. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies. s * a = = Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, In 
the Interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1910-1911. 

Nell Battle Lewis, Editor-in-Chief. 
Bessie Smedes Erwin, Caroline Clarke Jones, Janie Ruffin Sims, 

Elizabeth Byrd Henderson, Josephine Tonnoffski, 

Elizabeth Hughes, Isabelle Hester Perry, Rebecca Bennehan Wood. 

Elizabeth Woodard Leary, Business Manager. 
Amelia Pinckney Sturgeon, Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

EDITORIAL. 



"St. Mary's Spirit." 

We have heard a great deal about school spirit at St. Mary's. Espe- 
cially to those who have just entered school this year, the appeals for 
school spirit may seem so numerous that they may have come to pay 
little or no attention to them. It may be in a measure true that, tak- 
ing the term in which it is commonly understood, there is less school 
spirit here than there should be. 

But, undoubtedly, there is a spirit, distinctive, characteristic, which 
we may call the "St. Mary's Spirit." Let us take care that we do not 
lose that, that characteristic which has distinguished the St. Mary's 
girl from the beginning. Let us always remember the qualities for 
which St. Mary's has been representative — culture, refinement, and, 
above all, the highest type of Southern womanhood. 



Thanksgiving. 

Perhaps there are some of us, especially among the new girls, to 
whom the idea of Thanksgiving spent away from home seems, dreadful. 
Of course there are certain times in the year when home is the best 



The St. Mart's Muse. 121 

place to be, and Thanksgiving undoubtedly comes under that head. 
But Thanksgiving is very pleasant at St. Mary's. Every old girl 
knows that. The morning service in the chapel is one of the most 
beautiful of the many beautiful services that we have during the year, 
and the chapel never looks prettier than at Thanksgiving time, decor- 
ated with fruits and autumn leaves. Then the "boxes" in the after- 
noon ! One doesn't have to be at home to get roast turkey. 



pounders' Day. 

The first day of November has always had a double significance for 
St. Mary's girls. Not only is it the beautiful feast of All Saints, but 
it is Founders' Day as well. Founders' Day is in commemoration of 
Dr. Aldert Smedes, and those who, with him, first established St. 
Mary's upon the firm foundation on which she now stands. This is 
one of the distinctively "St. Mary's days" and there is no other day 
that could more fittingly be set apart for the memory of those "loyal 
hearts and true" than this — the Feast of All Saints. 



A Word to the Wise. 

Of course it goes without saying that this is addressed to the 
alumnae, especially is it addressed to those who became alumnse at the 
closing of school last May. There have been very few new subscrip- 
tions received, and many subscriptions which have expired have not 
been renewed. It is natural to assume that those who have been at 
St. Mary's most recently should be most interested in the school, and 
yet, very few of the girls who left last year have subscribed to the 
Muse. And that "great class of nineteen ten" — they made a most 
excellent Senior class — we all admit that — are they going to fall below 
the standard as alumnae ? Please, in this case, let a "word to the wise 
be sufficient." 



122 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Atlanta 

The Rector's Recent Trip. 

Having received an invitation to the Southern Conservation Con- 
gress in Atlanta, October 7th and 8th, I left Raleigh on the 3 :45 
train the morning of Friday the 7th. Of course I missed our morn- 
ing session with the speech of Mr. Pinchot, but I arrived in time for 
the afternoon session, and also for the dinner, at the Piedmont Riding 
Club, which was exceedingly pleasant on that evening. I had the 
pleasure of sitting with three gentlemen, who either live now, or for- 
merly lived in Richmond, Va., and who added much to the delight I 
had in the dinner. We had excellent speeches from Mr. Pinchot, Gov- 
ernor Hoke Smith, and other men interested in the various phases of 
Conservation. 

Saturday morning a number of papers were read, among them being 
an excellent one by Dr. Pratt, State Geologist of North Carolina, an 
uncle of our Miss Barton, and another one by Mrs. Ottley, the mother 
of Miss Passie May, who was here year before last. This last was 
specially delightful, not only on account of the matter contained in 
her address, but on account also of her unusually good elocution and 
delightful manner of delivery. It was to me the most delightful of 
all the papers read. The last paper was on "Health," the subject of 
all those under Conservation in which I was most interested. In the 
afternoon we had a business meeting, and then, as Colonel Roosevelt 
had not arrived, it was necessary to fill up time, and various ones 
were called on for speeches. The chairman described the "privilege 
and pleasure they had in the presence of an eminent educator," etc., 
etc., a description which I did not recognize at all until he spoke my 
name. So I made a little speech of about ten minutes and then some- 
body else made a speech, and then Colonel Roosevelt came in and made 
his speech. 

Strange to relate, there was a great deal in the paper next morning 
about Colonel Roosevelt's speech, and only two lines about mine. 

During this meeting I met Colonel Ludlow, of Winston-Salem, and 
spent quite a while that evening with him in going over matters in 
connection with the movement against tuberculosis, etc., in Winston- 



The St. Maky's Muse. 123 

Salem, which he is conducting in a very excellent manner, and is simi- 
lar to the movement which we are undertaking here in Raleigh. 

Sunday I took part in the services at St. Philip's Church, the Cathe- 
dral, assisting the Rev. Gilbert Higgs. Mr. Higgs was formerly for 
a number of years in Warrenton, North Carolina, and is one of the 
warmest friends that the Diocese and St. Mary's possesses. He was 
most cordial in every way, and it was very pleasant to meet him and to 
be the bearer of messages from him to people whom he knows here in 
Raleigh. 

Some very kind people whom I had not met before asked me to din- 
ner in Kirkwood, five miles from Atlanta, which I enjoyed very much, 
as I did also meeting the son of one of our Raleigh business men who 
was staying in the house. I got back to Atlanta in time to take part 
in the services in All Saints Church, the Rector of which is the Rev. 
Mr. Memminger, who was formerly Rector of St. Paul's Church, 
Charleston, South Carolina, and whom I met there last fall. In the 
evening I had the pleasure of taking supper with the family of Mr. 
Rosser, where I met Miss Nora Belle, and her sister, formerly Miss 
Julia Rosser, now Mrs. Eby. I also met there Miss Elizabeth Stur- 
geon, who was a St. Mary's girl, and several other pleasant people. This 
evening was a repetition of the very great pleasure I had had during 
my former visit there in December, 1907. 

On Monday I had lunch with Miss Woodberry at her school, although 
I did not meet many of the members of the school on account of the 
presence of Ringling's Circus in the city. She very kindly asked me 
to come the next morning and have prayers and speak to the girls, which 
I did. Inasmuch as they got out of spelling lesson during the time I 
was speaking, I felt that they would listen willingly at least, which I 
found to be the case. 

That afternoon I called on Mrs. Northen, the mother of Miss Mar- 
garet, and that night I dined at the Capital City Club with Mr. Northern 

I also called on Mrs. Peabody, the mother of Miss Carrie, and on 
Tuesday night had the pleasure of dining there. 

Tuesday morning I had prayers and spoke for a while to over a 
hundred girls at the Washington Seminary, where I was most cordially 
received by Mr. Scott and his wife and sister. I met there, as I did 



124 The St. Mary's Muse. 

at several other times, various ones who were relatives of girls here or 
whom I knew beforehand, which was a very pleasant feature of my visit 
to Atlanta. I called on Mrs. Harris, the mother of Miss Jennie, who 
kindly took me for an automobile ride, during which I met Miss Nettie 
Sargent, the Principal of the girls' high school of Atlanta, who I was 
surprised to find had herself taught the mothers of several of the girls 
we have here now. I might mention here that the girls' high school 
and boys' high school, respectively, are situated in far separated parts 
of Atlanta. I took this to be a tribute to the charms of the girls, and 
the good judgment of the boys. 

I also enjoyed a call, all too short, on Mrs. Monsalvatge, where I saw 
Miss Edna and Miss Mabel. There seems to be some hope of Miss 
Mabel returning to us after Christmas. 

On Tuesday I spent from noon to six o'clock on a little trip to Mari- 
etta, which I found most enjoyable. I was met by Miss Isabel Brumby 
with a very nice little horse and buggy. I drove around some before 
lunch, and also afterwards, and I took lunch with Mrs. Hoppe and her 
family. I called on Mrs. Field, the mother of Miss Annie, and had the 
pleasure of meeting the wife of Governor Brown, of Georgia. 

I made a very short call on Governor Brown. I also called on various 
officials of the Congress, who had been very courteous to me, and en- 
joyed these calls very much. I called on Mr. Ottley and Mr. Harman, 
but they were both out of town, and also on Mrs. Edward Brown, who 
was sick, so I could not see her, though I had the pleasure of a short 
talk with Miss Marjorie Brown. Geo. W. Lay. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank ... - Alumnae Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 
Honorary President - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - { «£ g&* S^ffig^' 

President .... Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - - - - Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 

Secretary - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer ... - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 

Field Secretary ... Miss Mary F. Henderson, Salisbury. 



EDITORIAL. 



The Muse the Official Organ of the Alumnae. 

Ever since the revival of publication in 1905 the Muse has been pub- 
lished in the joint interest of the students and Alumnae, and the effort 
has constantly been made to improve the Alumna? section, but, partly 
through lack of sources of information, partly from other causes, the 
Alumnae news has never been regular or full. 

A hundred of the Alumnae showed their interest in the revival of pub- 
lication of the Muse by subscribing to it, and many of these have kept 
up their subscriptions regularly since, but the subscription list grows 
slowly, and sometimes it seems that the Muse takes more pleasure in 
the Alumnae than the Alumnae in the Muse. 

At the Alumnae meeting last May, however, the Muse was adopted 
by the Association, and provision was made for the improvement of the 
Alumnae section in the following resolutions : 

Resolved, That the x\ssociation formally endorses the St. Mary's 
Muse as the official organ of the Association, and urges its members to 
subscribe to the Muse, the subscription price being one dollar a year for 
the ten numbers including the two Alumnae numbers. 

Resolved further, That the Association instructs the Alumnae Council 
to appoint one or more members of the Association to act as Alumnae 
editors of the Muse, in cooperation with the editors of the Muse. 

Resolved further, That the Association urges the Alumnae chapters to 



126 The St. Mary's Muse. 

each appoint a correspondent who shall send the news of the chapter to 
the Muse as frequently as possible. 

As stated by the President, Mrs. Shipp, in the October Muse, the 
Alumnae Association is now starting a campaign for a membership of 
one thousand. The more Alumnae interested and the deeper their inter- 
est the more hope for the success of the campaign. Nothing should be 
able to help along the campaign more than the Muse, but only if it has 
the news for the readers and readers for the news. 

Here is a real opportunity for the Alumnae at very little cost to lend 
real help. Financial obligations are very moderate under the new plan 
of alumnae organization. One dollar pays all the annual dues of the 
alumnae in both the general association and the home chapter. Add to 
this one dollar more and have the Muse for the next year, and she will 
have the alumnae news and the alumnae objects before her month by 
month, and no likelihood of being asked for further financial outlay 
during the year. 

If the Alumnae who could help and would like to help would subscribe 
to the Muse the news would have far more interested readers. On the 
other hand these same readers should bear in mind that much news will 
escape unless they each do their part in sending in the news that comes 
under their notice. If there is a chapter in the town see that the chapter 
correspondent gets the news item and sends it in ; if there is no chapter, 
send it direct. 

ISTow is the time for action. 



The Founders' Day Program. 

The second Aldert Swedes Memorial Number of the Muse, issued 
in connection with the Centennial of April 20th, was published and 
ready for distribution just prior to Founders' Day, and was at once 
mailed to the subscribers to the Muse and the Alumnae who had made 
request for a copy of it. 

At the same time was published the deferred Alumnae number of the 
St. Mary's Bulletin (No. 19), with the account of the May meeting of 
the Alumnae Association, the constitution of the Association adopted 
at the May meeting, and a list of the graduates corrected to date. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 127 

The program suggested for the Founders' Day meetings of the 
Alumnae was based on the material found in this Muse and this Bulletin, 
and copies of both were sent to some sixty towns to representative 
Alumnae, with the request that they lend their aid toward having meet- 
ings in their towns. 

Should there be enough reports from these Founders' Day meetings 
to justify doing so it is proposed to issue another Alumnae number of 
the Muse in the near future, with these accounts and other Alumnae con- 
tributions. In this number will also appear the pictures of some of the 
earliest Alumnae of the school, including some of the "original thirteen." 

The Alumnae Constitution provides for Alumnae meetings in the 
towns on Founders' Day if possible ; if not possible, then at some con- 
venient date thereabout ; so we hope that, even in those towns in which 
meetings could not be held on Founders' Day, there will be meetings 
held and chapters organized or revived during the month. 

At this writing reports have been received from the chapters in Chapel 
Hill, Henderson, Rocky Mount and Edenton, and notice of meetings 
pending has been had from a number of other places. 



The Field Secretary. 

A few words in explanation of the purpose and work of the Field 
Secretary may not be amiss. 

The purpose of the new movement in Alumnae affairs is to bring the 
Alumnae closer together, to promote more concerted and effective action. 
To achieve this purpose nothing can avail more than the effective per- 
sonal contact. The formation of chapters is advised to bring the 
Alumnae together more closely locally ; the Muse is urged to bring the 
Alumnae into closer knowledge of each other as a whole ; the Field Sec- 
retary is delegated to take the personal touch from chapter to chapter, 
from town to town, to make the union of the chapters seem more real 
and actual. 

When the work is well organized it is hoped that the Field Secretary 
can visit each chapter annually, explaining, advising, encouraging, in- 
specting. Such annual visits would do much to strengthen and brighten 
the chapters and help them in their work. 



128 The St. Mary's Muse. 

This year the work of the Secretary must necessarily be more or less 
preliminary. If the local Alunmse wish her help in organizing she 
will help ; if they are not alive to the importance of an organization 
she will try to make them see its importance ; but chiefly she will be ob- 
serving conditions and seeking to put the Alumnse in touch with the 
Association, with the school, and with each other. 

Miss Henderson will this fall visit the towns west of Raleigh. She 
has not yet announced her itinerary, but all will follow it with inter- 
est. In the next Muse we hope to be able to speak more definitely of 
her work. 



Founders' Day at St. Mary's. 

Founders' Day, as all of the Alumnse know, has been for some years 
the special day of St. Mary's Alumnse, and the gatherings of the 
Alumnse in their several towns for the Founders' Day meetings always 
tend to put new energy into Alumnse affairs. The observance this 
year in Raleigh was highly satisfactory in every way, and the reports 
already received from other points indicate that throughout St. Mary's 
territory the meetings were enthusiastic. 

Though Raleigh Alumnse have, year by year, joined with the school in 
its All Saints' services, for the first time in recent years a special 
meeting was held this year by the Alumnse, this taking the form of a 
tea given by Mrs. Shipp and the other members of the Alumnse Council 
in honor of Miss Mary Henderson, the new Field Secretary of the 
Association ; and though the school has kept Founders' Day as a holi- 
day for years, for the first time this year special exercises commemo- 
rating the day were held by the student body, in addition to the Chapel 
services. 

The observance of the day began as usual with the celebration of the 
Holy Communion, and the regular All Saints' service was held in the 
Chapel at eleven o'clock, the rector preaching. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 129 

The Student Program. 

At 3 o'clock the students assembled in the Auditorium for the Found- 
ers' Day exercises. The program was given as the first inter-society 
meeting of the year, and Miss Nell Lewis, President of the Epsilon 
Alpha Pi, presided. The speakers occupied places with the presi- 
dent on the platform. 

After the singing of "Carolina" Miss Lewis explained the purpose of 
the meeting and the importance of the occasion, and introduced the 
Rector, who spoke for ten minutes on Founders' Day and the Founders, 
paying tribute to those who, from Dr. Aldert Smedes on, have put so 
much of themselves into the development of the school. 

Miss Anna Buxton of the faculty was then introduced, and gave 
greeting from the Alumnae to the girls of the present. She recalled her 
student days, ten years back, and gave some of the impressions she had 
from those school days at St. Mary's, when she little thought that she 
would return later as a teacher. She took the opportunity to emphasize 
the value of certain points in the St. Mary's training, especially the 
Chapel services. The girls have great faith in Miss Buxton, and fol- 
lowed her address with keen interest and appreciation. 

After Miss Buxton's address Miss Tinsley Harrison read Miss Mc- 
Vea's Centennial Poem, and Miss Helen McArthur read the tribute 
to Dr. Aldert Smedes, delivered by Bishop Strange at the Centennial. 

The meeting then closed with the singing of Alma Mater. 

The Alumnae Tea. 

The parlor had been very prettily decorated for the Alumnae tea, and 
the local members of the Alumnse Council had invited to the tea the 
Alumnee of Raleigh of all ages, having sent individual invitations to 
those whose names and addresses were available. The weather was 
excellent, the attendance highly satisfactory, and the gathering very 
enthusiastic. 

The guests were received at the door by Miss Annie Root of the 
Council, and in the receiving line were Mrs. Shipp, the President of 
the Association, Miss Henderson, of Salisbury, Field Secretary of the 
Association and the guest of honor of the occasion. Miss Eleanor 
Thomas, Lady Principal of the School, and the other local members 



130 The St. Mary's Muse. 



of the Council, Miss McKimmon, Miss Dowd, Mrs. Knox, Mrs. Wins- 
ton and Mrs. Cox. 

A number of the Alumnse were present who had hardly been inside 
of St. Mary's since their school days, and a very pleasant hour was 
spent in talking over pleasant memories and renewing old ties. At 5 
o'clock Mrs. Shipp invited those present to remain for an informal 
alumnse meeting, and after music by Miss Sherwin, of the faculty, brief 
addresses were delivered by the Rector, Mrs. Winston, Miss Buxton 
and Mrs. Shipp. Mr. Lay emphasized the importance of alumnae ac- 
tivity ; Mrs. Winston called attention to the need of a strong Raleigh 
local chapter, and Miss Buxton told of some of the aluninse activity of 
Miss Baldwin's school at Bryn Mawr, of which she is an alumna. 

Mrs. Shipp, after a few concluding remarks announced certain ap- 
pointments which she had made in connection with her duties as Presi- 
dent as follows : 

Committee on the Alumnae Muse — Mrs. Pittenger, Chairman. 
Committee on the Alumnw Roll — Miss Sarah Cheshire, Chairman. 
Committee on Nominations — Mrs. J. H. Holmes, Chairman. 
Committee on Organization of a Raleigh Chapter — Miss Annie 
Root, Chairman. 

In addition to the Alumnse, the members of the Faculty, and about 
twenty of the girls representing the student body were present at 
the Tea. Refreshments of tea, sandwiches, and wafers were served. 



WEDDINGS. 



A number of weddings of more than ordinary interest to St. Mary's 
have taken place or will be celebrated this month. 

Possibly the marriage of most interest to St. Maryites of the present 
was the wedding in New York on October 12th of Miss Georgina Kel- 
logg, who was head of the French Department during the sessions of 
1908-09 and 1909-10, and very popular alike with fellow-teachers and 
girls. The other brides, not so well known to the girls of the present, 
all have their many friends among the St. Mary's people of their 



The St. Maky's Muse. 131 

day. The Muse extends to each the greetings of Alma Mater and her 
best wishes for their highest happiness. 

Reynolds-Kellogg : Dr. and Mrs. Edwin Savin Kellogg announce 
the marriage of their daughter, Georgina Savin, to Mr. Randolph 
Smith Reynolds, on "Wednesday, the twelfth of October, in the city of 
New York. 

Miss Kellogg was married quietly in the chancery of Grace Church 
with only a few intimate friends present. Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds will 
live in Pittsburg, their address being Park Place Hotel, Sewickley, Pa. 

Coppedge-Monroe: Mrs. Mary Campbell Monroe announces the 
marriage of her daughter, Maude Pemberton, to Mr. Donald Lattimer 
Coppedge, on Wednesday, October the twelfth, Rockingham, North 
Carolina. 

'"Maude Monroe" was only in St. Mary's for a few months in 1908, 
but is remembered by her acquaintances of that year. 

Summer-By nam : Mrs. William Shipp Bynum announces the mar- 
riage of her daughter, Mary deRosset, to Mr. William Hoke Sumner, 
on Tuesday, the eighteenth of October, Fletcher, North Carolina. 

All four of the Bynums are St. Mary's girls — "Eliza" (Mrs. Jus- 
tice), "Mary" (now Mrs. Sumner), "Minna" (Mrs. Archibald Hen- 
derson), and "Susan" — and all have hosts of friends among St. Mary's 
people. 

Whahy-Hodges : Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Hodges request the pleasure 
of your company at the marriage of their daughter, Emily Nash, to 
Mr. William Allen Whaley, on the evening of Wednesday, the twenty- 
sixth of October, at half after eight o'clock. The Jefferson, Raleigh 
Avenue, Norfolk, Va. 

"Emily Hodges" was one of the group of Wilson girls at St. Mary's 
in 1003-01. She has since been living in Newport News and Norfolk. 

Cobb-Gatlin: Mrs. Richard Caswell Gatlin announces the marriage 
of her daughter, Mary Knox, to Mr. Collier Cobb on Thursday, the 
twenty-seventh of October. Little Rock, Arkansas. 

Professor Cobb has always been closely associated with St. Mary's 
interests, and Miss Gatlin, whose home was then in Port Smith, Ark., 
was a prominent St. Mary's girl in the '90's "when McKimmonsville 



132 The St. Maky's Muse. 

flourished," so this wedding has a double interest. Professor and Mrs. 
Cobb will live in Chapel Hill. 

Rogers-Trapier : Miss Margaret Haywood Cameron Trapier, daugh- 
ter of Mrs. Edward Shubrick Trapier, of Raleigh, and Commander 
Allen G. Rogers, U. S. 1ST., retired, were married in Christ Church, 
Raleigh, on November twenty-fifth. 

Like the other members of her family, Miss Margaret Trapier was 
a St. Mary's girl throughout her school days, graduating in 1899. Her 
aunt, Mrs. Annie Haywood Ruffin, was one of the "original thirteen." 

Gammon-Fountain: Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Fountain request the 
honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter, Vernon Hope, 
to Mr. Ruick Gustavus Gammon, Wednesday evening, November sec- 
ond, at eight-thirty. Olivette Presbyterian Church, Leggetts, North 
Carolina. 

"Vernon Fountain" was a St. Mary's girl for a short time in 1907- 
08 and again in 1907-08, and is pleasantly remembered. 

Gales-Seymour: Doctor and Mrs. H. Seymour Houghton request 
the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughters, Florence 
Preston to Mr. Reuben Morris Ellis, and Helene Seymour to Mr. 
George M. Gales, on Wednesday, the sixteenth of November, at four 
o'clock, at St. Bartholomew's Church in the city of New York. 

In this case it is the groom in whom we are interested, he having 
been a "St, Mary's boy" with Miss Katie in the days before she re- 
jected boys. 

Haywood-Dochery : Mr. and Mrs. Henry Clay Dockery request the 
pleasure of your company at the wedding reception of their daughter, 
Nettie Walker, and Mr. William Grimes Haywood, on the evening of 
Wednesday, the sixteenth of November, at eight o'clock, at Rocking- 
ham, North Carolina. 

Miss Nettie Dockery has spent much of her time in Raleigh since 
her school days at St, Mary's and will make her home in Raleigh as 
a bride. 

McKimmon-N orris: Mr. and Mrs. M. T. Norris request the honor 
of your presence at the marriage of their daughter, Willa, to Mr. James 
McKimmon, Wednesday evening, the second of November, nineteen 



The St. Mary's Muse. 133 

hundred and ten, at six o'clock, Christ Church, Raleigh, North 
Carolina. 

The marriage of "Jim McKimmon" and "Willa Norris" is of in- 
terest to many St. Mary's girls of a few years back who have known 
them both well. The groom is a nephew of Miss Katie, and in his 
earlier youth beaued many a St. Mary's girl, whose school days were 
made more pleasant thereby. For the past few years he has been a 
member of the banking force of the Raleigh Banking and Trust Com- 
pany. The bride, who like the groom has spent all her life in Raleigh, 
has been a very popular member of Raleigh society since her early 
girlhood and won many friends at St. Mary's during her school 
days here. 



NOTES. 



St. Maryites are interested in the candidacy of President Woodrow 
Wilson, of Princeton, for Governor of New Jersey, not on account of 
the political aspect so much as through interest in Dr. Wilson as the 
father of Miss Nell, who was a St. Mary's girl in 1907-09, and is now 
an interested alumna. 

St. Mary's friends were shocked and distressed at the tragic death 
of Mr. Milton R. Bacon, of Albany, Ga., as the result of an accident 
in the Vanderbilt Cup automobile race on Long Island on October 1st. 
Mrs. Bacon was Miss Kate Hawley, '98, of Fayetteville, Miss Kate 
McKimmon's niece, and she with her little son was abroad at the time 
of the accident. Miss Katie attended the funeral services in Fayette- 
ville on October 17th. 

Friends of "the Deatons," Grace and Irma, were saddened by the 
serious accident which befell their father, Mr. M. B. Deaton, of Ral- 
eigh, in a runaway accident on Hillsboro street on October 16th. 

The Youth's Companion announces for publication in 1911 a story, 
"The Soft Snap," by Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp. The announce- 
ment says "A charming flavor of the South pervades this story of life 
in a girls.' school. It has besides a sympathetic spirit with which local 
boundaries have nothing to do." Muse readers will look for this story 



134 The St. Mary's Muse. 

with much interest, as it is understood to deal with life as found at St. 
Mary's and so well interpreted by Mrs. Shipp in her after-dinner talk 
at the Smedes' Centennial. 

We often hear of the missionary work done by St. Mary's girls in 
the past, but we wonder how many realize how many workers St. Mary's 
has been contributing to the mission field in the present. Of course 
thought goes first to Bishop Cheshire's daughters who, after careful 
training for their work, went to China a year ago, Miss Annie ('03) to 
Wusih, and Miss Elizabeth ('95) to Wuchang. But even before they 
reached their work "Placide Bridgers," of Tarboro, who had married 
Rev. Robb White a year or two before, went with him to work in the 
Philippines, where they are located at Bagnio, and Mrs. White's sister, 
"Reba Bridgers," joined them last winter. Then turn to the domestic 
field : Mrs. Geffroy's long and faithful work at St. Paul's School, Beau- 
fort, is almost entirely missionary; Miss Kate Cheshire ('80), the 
Bishop's sister, has worked long in the mill missions in Edgecombe 
County ; Miss Emma Karrer has been for several years at Mayodan ; 
Miss Mary Horner, of Oxford, after training in New York for a year, 
has taken charge of the work at Valle Crucis. The Hughsons, Mar- 
jorie ('04) and Dorothy ('05), have given of themselves freely in the 
mission hospital at Morganton, to which they and their mother have 
devoted themselves after Rev. Mr. Hughson's death, until the death of 
Miss Marjorie last spring. Only recently we have heard from Anne 
Miller ('03-05), who is at work in the Mission School at Clark, Greene 
County, Virginia. And so it goes ; a very honorable roll without the 
addition of the names of many others who should doubtless be added. 



RE0D!-MflRK!-flCTl 



The E'litors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The MUSE, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



1 It's worth the difference ' 



WHARTON & TYREE 



" Workers in Artistic Photography' 



The Muse is the official organ of the Alumnae, adopted 
by the Association, May, 1910. 

If the Alumnae would more freely write to the Muse, the 
Muse could give better Alumnae news. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 

MILLINERY 



Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEARCE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders rilled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVIl.LE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH. X. C. 



Advertisements. 



Chas. E. Johnson F. H. Briggs 

PRESIDENT CASHIER 

THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST GO. 

"round STEPS bank" SINCE 1865 

WE APPRECIATE OLD FRIENDS 

AND 

WELCOME THE NEW 
4% Time Certificates of Deposit Call at the Bank 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

Jolly &■ Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 




St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 

Raleigh, N C. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 



St. Mary's Sofa Pillows, 
St. Mary's Seal Stationery, 
St. Mary's Seal Pins, 
St. Mary's Pennants, 
St. Mary's Calendars, 
May be had by writing to The Muse. 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 


ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 


Dr. F. D. CASTLEBURY 
Dentist 


ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 


AYCOCK & WINSTON 


Attorneys at Law 
raleigh, n. c. 


Hunter Bros. & Brewer Company 


JOHN C. DREWRY. 


Dry fiiM'Ds, Notions and Shoes 
210 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 


"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE." 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
Millinery. 


Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 






GRIMES & VASS, Raleigh, N. C 
Fire Insurance and Investments. 


J. R. FERRALL & CO.— GROCERS. 
Best of everything in ourline. 

222 Fayetteville Street. 


Dr. D. E. EVERETT 

DENTIST 


PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

109 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 






It will well pay you to buy your Ready-to-Wear 

Garments at our store because we sell 

better goods for less money 

THE FASHION 203-205 Fayetteville St. 


Why is Brantley's Fountain the Most Popular ? 
ASK THE GIRLS 



Advertisements. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU 

RALEIGH, X. C. 

Invites correspondence with teachers open to en- 
gagement and with school officers seeking com- 
petent teachers. NO CHARGE TO SCHOOL 
OFFICERS. Full particulars free. 

CHAS. J. PARKER, Manager 



MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 

OF RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital 3100,000.00 4 per cent paid in Savings 

Department 
E. C. Duncan, Pres. W. B. Drake, Jr., Cash. 

A. H. FETTING 

Manufacturer of Greek Letter Fraternity 
Jewelry, 213 N. Liberty St., Baltimore, Md. 

Factory: 213 Little Sharp St. 

>6Eg" Memorandum package sent to any fraternity 
member through the Secretary of Chapter. Special 
designs and estimates furnished on class pins, rings, 
medals for athletic meets, etc. 



J^-£dward$^A\ 
&broughtq/>m^\ 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 

and Power 

f 174 
Both Phones: < 99c 



The Yarborotjgh House 

invites your patronage 



The School authorities will he glad to mail on request the current St. 
Mary's Bulletins, with full information about the School. 

Bulletin 18, General Information (Catalogue). July, 1910. 

Bulletin 14, Academic Position of St. Mary's. 

Bulletin 15, Academic Courses and Announcements. October, 1909. 

Bulletin 16, Scholarships. March, 1910. 

Bulletin 17, Miss McVea's Address. May, 1910. 

Bulletin 19, Alumna? Constitution, etc. September, 1910. 

Bulletin 20, Annual Awards and Records. November, 1910. 



K I N'G 'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 


SEND TO 

Plummer's Stables 

For Riding and Driving Horses 


E. M. UZZELL & CO , 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
R\LE1GH. N. C. 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS RY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Banning Solicited 

THE MECHANICS S WINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 


S. Wilmington Street 


CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 
Fayetteville Street. 


RALEIGH HAVINGS BANK, J. T. Pullen. 
Pm»..Chas. Roi)t,Cisli'r Capital and Surplus 
875,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 



Advertisements. 



Herbert Rosenthal 



LADIES' FINE SHOES 



INSURE IN THE 

Jefferson Standard Life Ins. Go. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Strongest in the South 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. 0'Q,UINN & C<>. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Kaleigh, N. C. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 
COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 



131 Fayetteville Street, 
Kaleigh, N. C. 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 



5 West Hargett St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY 

CANDY CHINA — TOYS 

PICTURES STATIONERY 



ONE DOLLAR pays for the Muse for a year (ten numbers). 

Send the Dollar NOW. 



CALL 

FREEMAN'S STABLES 

When You Want a Good Saddle 
Horse, or a Good Horse and Buggy 
Both Phones 


J. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 


ROBT SIMPSON ^^fllcR^ioNisx 


H. T. HICKS & COMPANY 

For Toilet Requisites and 


Good things always at 


Colds Drinks 


BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 


Eat Betts' Ice Cream 


Raleigh, N. C. 
Everythinein An. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



POOL & CROCKER 

up-to-date 
FOOTWEAR 

Special Attention to Fit 

105 Favetteville St. 



KING-CRO WELL'S DRUG STORE 



AND SODA FOUNTAIN 



Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, X. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHXSOX, A. A. THOMPSON, 

President. Treasurer. 

G. H. DORTCH, R. S. BUSBEE, 

Secretary. General Manager. 



Sample copies of the Muse will be mailed 
to Alumnae at any time on request. 



Dr. L. J. PEGRAM 

DENTIST 
Office 209% Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. C. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
College Postals 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 



M. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 



GROCERS 



WILMINGTON <fc HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Usethe best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEIN METZ, 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113. 


SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located at 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th Sts\, Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 


T. W. BLAKE 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware 
Repairing promptly done 


watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new jewelry and reparin** 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 


Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 

Dentist. 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art. 

Embroiddery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 



"YOURS FOR HEALTH" 

WEST DISINFECTING COMPANY 

S. S. SELIG, Jr., General Sales Agent. ATLANTA, GA. 

LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF DISINFECTANTS IN THE WORLD 



November 17th. 5:00 p.m. Pupils' Recital. 

November 23d. 8:15 p.m. Inter-Society Meeting. 

November 24th. Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. 

December Sth. 8:30 p.m. First Peace-St. Mary's Artists' Concert. Madame Rider- 

Kelsey, Soprano. 

December 12th. 8:15 p.m. Mr. Owen presents the Chorus Class in " '' 

December 15th. Pre-Christmas Entertainment. 

December 16th. Christmas Vacation begins at 3:15 p.m. 



NORFOLK -SO UTH ERN 

New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

Express train service between Raleigh, Wilson, Greenville, Goldsboro, Kinston, 

New Bern, Morehead City, Washington, Plymouth, Elizabeth City, 

Virginia Beach and Norfolk, Virginia. 



VIA NORFOLK TO NORTH AND EAST 
VIA RALEIGH TO SOUTH AND WEST 

6 






. . CetUralfor the Carolina*. 



Qlvmfijtg Weat^hyamd SdivCl 




Y's School, 



wstss^w^G; 



* (I or gwfecmd young- wowieri). 



lNNTJAJ, SESSION 3^#&S SEPTEMBER 15, 1910. 






offers imtructioi 



COLLEGE, 
LJSIO SCHOOL. 
BUSINESS SCHOOL. 
[RT SCHOOL. 
PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



i ^■HBBHI^Hi 



W/ Furnished, Progressive Mt4. 



win 16 Dioceses. 

gfett Members of the Faculty. 



A/wcA Equipment New. Thirty rsix 
II all and Dormitories. 



Special aUe-n&m lo the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Fw Catalogue and ot he Art J 'or -mat ion address 



Rev. George W. Lay, 



Rector. 



. . . 






"The Call of the South for the College-bred 
Woman"— -an Editorial 



St. flfcary's flfouee 



^December, 1910— 3anuarp, im 




IRaleiQb, «. (E. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

HOLIDAY NUMBER. 



Vol. XV. December, 19 10- January, 1911. ]STo. 5 



Youth 



ANNE BRUMBY FIELD. 



Unthinking youth! Blessings upon thy ways 
And joyous be thy never-ceasing dreams; 

May never Sorrow dim thy beauteous days 
Nor Pleasure fail to cast on thee her beams. 

Live now and love ; fast fly the fleeting years : 
The harder struggle — that of life — remains, 

For time will change the causes of thy tears 
And add the richer, deeper joys and pains. 

But seek while young the noblest and the best, 
That which in perfect harmony true voices sing; 

Know that life's lesson is to keep the tryst, 
Strive to right wrong and follow the King. 



"Everyday Sketches." 
Fo. I. 

The little maples by the path rustle their red-gold leaves and grow 
more brilliant in the soft sunshine of Indian Summer, and the pillars 
of the big porch gleam white against the dull red of Main Building. 

A group of girls are lounging idly on the broad steps. Some one 
murmurs the opening lines of the collect, for the day, and the crowd 
takes it up, chanting in sing-song fashion, then relapses into its former 
tranquility. They watch the girls scattered over the grove or the 
squirrel that works busily, or survey with tranquil satisfaction their 
own carefully manicured nails, and drowsy in the warm sunshine 
rest silent, idly content. 

Off somewhtre a whistle sounds, a window is raised, a head is thrust 
out, and, 



136 The St. Mary's Muse. 



"Hello ! In a minute," and the window bangs shut again. 

A girl comes out of East Rock, her arms full of yellow chrysanthe- 
mums. The crowd hums, "Here comes the bride," and laughs. Some 
one jumps up from the steps and, leaving the crowd lazily protesting 
at the disturbance, runs down to the girl with the flowers, throws an 
arm around her shoulders, and they go over to chapel together. 

Over at the chapel people are busy. Chapel is the heart of the 
place. They are dressing the altar with chrysanthemums. The or- 
ganist is playing the Processional over softly, and two girls are collect- 
ing the hymnals. Miss Katie is there. 

******* 

The evening service, the sweetest service of all, is ending. The Re- 
cessional is "The Son of God goes forth to war," and everybody sings. 
After supper people drift into the parlor, and into the schoolroom to 
write letters. Out on the porch the moonlight is very bright and the 
stars are crisp and clear. In the parlor someone with a very sweet 
voice is singing the "Song of the Soul," and you sit in the shadow of a 
column with your arms around your best friend and think, and don't 
say much. 

After a time some one comes out and suggests ghost stories in the 
parlor with the lights out, and you go in. 

Pretty soon you find that you and the crowd around are the only 
ones that are left in the parlor. So the crowd rises slowly, yawns, and 
disperses. 

The Dawning. 

BY PATSEY HARRY SMITH. 



I. 

It was an evil time in an evil age, at the stormy close of a wild day. 
The wind howled, the rain poured ; but the fury of the storm without 
was equaled in intensity by the excess of the grief within a castle of 
no very great size, which bore all the characteristics peculiar to the 
early, feudal era. And why should there not have been grief in the 
castle of Lockrent ? In the shadowy halls retainers dejectedly gathered 
In groups of twos and threes spoke in hushed voices of the loss of their 



The St. Mary's Muse. 137 



Young mistress, while in a more secluded apartment the aged Lord of 
Lockrent bemoaned the loss of an only and cherished daughter. But 
Adelheid of Lockrent was not dead. Dead ? Xo, but worse. That 
morning she had been forced away, by a command that none dared 
oppose, to become the unwilling bride of Ornulf. Ornulf, the most 
powerful and by all agreed the wickedest lord of that rude time, whose 
long boats enriched his walls with booty from many a plundered coast, 
and whose castle, with its frowning battlements and lofty turrets, was 
one of the largest in all the land and the seat of lawlessness and evil. 
There Ornulf lived amidst his wicked court, and all whom he chose 
became his servants, for no man dared withstand the will that was 
powerful enough even to defy that of the king. Many times had "the 
church" and powers of Christendom attempted to exert their influences, 
'but only in vain, and the chapel within the castle walls remained closed. 

As the Lord of Lockrent paced the floor of his apartment in the 
potency of his grief and realized that he was powerless to alter the 
fate of his daughter, his dark broodings were suddenly interrupted by 
the unannounced entrance of a man of striking appearance, whose 
clothes, those of a priest of that time, bore marks of travel, and whose 
massive features, denoting great strength, and flashing eyes showed the 
uew-comer to be greatly moved. By his unusual height he might have 
been recognized as the Holy man of Ife, whose unusual learnino- in 
that illiterate age, religious zeal, and knowledge of the heavens made 
him a personage at once to be sought by many and feared by all. 
Hardly had he entered when he began to speak in a voice that at once 
attracted the hearer: 

"Cease thy grief, repent, repent for thy sins ! I give you the mes- 
sage I give to all men, the message I shall take to Ornulf and his infa- 
mous court to-night — the message to repent ; for, by signs in the heavens 
and mystical omens I know that unless to-night all men repent, to- 
morrow's dawn will bring the end of the world." 

II. 

Yes, it was an evil time in an evil age and upon the stormy night of 
a wild day. The rain poured, the wind howled, but the abating fury 
of the storm without was in contrast with the increasing merriment of 



138 The St. Mary's Muse. 



the mad revelry within a spacious, richly tapestried, and brilliantly- 
liffhted hall in the castle of Ornulf. Here all his wicked court in- 
dulged in their customary gayeties midst the crash of crude instru- 
ments and the songs of ill-trained minstrels, but to-night the dancers 
lacked their leader and the very soul of all revelry had withdrawn from 
the revelers to the dais or raised platform at one end of the apartment, 
where he sat frowningly gazing into space apparently indifferent to 
all the gay company. Yet from time to time he turned to look at the 
girl, not far distant from him, who sat in an attitude something akin to 
despair and tightly clasped the crucifix she wore suspended on a cord 
from her neck. Whenever Ornulf looked upon her face, very fair but 
very sad, the frown which distorted his face — a face of almost perfect 
contour and of an indefinable fascination, the beauty of which was 
somewhat marred by the deepening lines which gave a cruel, vindictive 
expression to his mouth — made deeper the furrows on his brow. 
Adelhied presented to him a problem that as yet he had been unable to 
solve. She had produced a greater effect upon him in the few hours 
that she had been a prisoner in the castle than any one else in the little 
more than a quarter of a century which he had lived. She had laughed 
at his threats, scorned what he termed his love, disregarded his wealth 
and promises of power, shamed the life of his castle and its court, made 
him feel for the first time powerless, and had won from him the first 
admiration he had ever bestowed on any. The age was one of great 
superstition, and wicked as men were the worst of them feared death 
without absolution from sin, and Adelheid had so spoken of death that 
Ornulf for the first time felt fear clutch his heart, and began to wonder 
if it were not better to possess a like religious faith and to draw thus 
from strength and fearlessness such as hers; for, loath as he was to 
admit it, he, Ornulf, feared death. As he sat thus moodily attempting 
to make at one the many turbulent and conflicting emotions in his 
heart and to reason why his conceptions had so changed, the noise in 
the hall suddenly quieted and, looking up, he saw the attention of all 
fixed upon one, a stranger who had just arrived, unexpectedly and 
without announcement. There was something about his disheveled and 
wind-blown appearance, pallid, distraught countenance and burning 
eyes, religious garb and massive proportions that so awed the inmates 



The St. Mary's Muse. 139 



of the hall that when the holy man of Ife — for it was none other- 
began to speak in an inrpassioned voice vibrant with smothered emo- 
tions, all other sounds immediately ceased. 

"Repent, repent ye of your sins ! For by holy signs and symbols, by 
mystical omens and starry visions I know that unless to-night all repent 
of their sins and seek forgiveness to-morrow's dawn will bring the end 
of the world." 

Something of divine power must have been to the holy man of Ife, 
for, as his voice which had increased in volume as he proceeded ab- 
ruptly ceased a shudder went through that silent company, then a moan 
arose and "the dawning, the dawning will bring death" passed from 
mouth to mouth until the walls reverberated with the doleful sound ; 
but suddenly above the din a cry arose and Ornulf, as pale as if death 
already held him in its grasp, was seen to rise to his full height and 
then to fall at the feet of Adelheid crying: 

"I am afraid, I am afraid ; teach me to repent, teach me to pray 
before the dawning !" All that gruesome night the holy man of Ife 
and Adelheid did all in their power to teach the sin-darkened souls of 
that dark castle true repentance and the hope and peace to be obtained 
therefrom, and just before the dawn every inmate of the castle crowded 
into the courtyard and there — the rain having ceased — with straining 
and blood-shot eyes all watched the eastern horizon as it became 
streaked with grey, which gradually took on the faint rosy tints of the 
approaching day. And when the sun, a flaming disk, at length ap- 
peared there went up a cry from the gathered crowd that was echoed 
among the surrounding hills, and then all with one accord knelt to give 
a prayer of thanksgiving for the glorious dawning that brought an end 
to their old wickedness, faith and hope, and the beginning of a far, far 
better life in the castle of Ornulf, over which Adelheid became the 
willing mistress. 



140 The St. Mary's Muse. 



A Night in Venice. 



REBECCA BENEHAN WOOD. 



Venice and a gondola ! For weeks we had dreamed of it, and 
thrilled over the prospect, and now, at last, we found ourselves, on the 
night of July 6th, stepping from the narrow porch of the Grand Hotel 
into the waiting gondolas. There were just sixteen of us, and we com- 
fortably filled four gondolas. 

As soon as we had settled back on the cushions, the gondoliers, who 
stood on the raised sterns of the boats, began to paddle with a swift, 
silent stroke, and we found ourselves in mid-stream, floating swiftly 
down the Grand Canal. On either side of us stood the old Venetian 
palaces, the lights from whose windows flung vari-colored reflections 
across the water. One of these palaces, the gondoliers informed us in 
a mixture of Italian and broken English, is now a great Venetian glass 
factory, and another is the palace which was occupied by Robert 
Browning. 

Soon we swept under the great bridge of Eialto, and entered one of 
the smaller canals. Here we had a great surprise, for the gondoliers, 
without so much as saying "by your leave," drew us up at the door of 
a drinking house and called out loudly for some one to serve them. 
We had to sit patiently by and wait until the drinks were brought, then 
the gondoliers, still standing high in the stern, waved their glasses 
over their heads, and drank, with great enthusiasm, to "Venezia" and 
"Amerika." 

After this we were allowed to move on through the silent, dark canal, 
but only for a few moments. Just as we were about to go under a 
bridge, one of the gondoliers suddenly stopped the procession, and 
placing his head just under the arch, broke the silence with a great, 
discordant roar. His voice was naturally big and harsh, but when 
heard echoing under the great arch and between the close-set walls, it 
was truly deafening. However, in spite of our discomfort, we were 
not allowed to proceed until he had finished the entire song, which was 
several verses in length. At the conclusion we looked up to see the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 141 



bridge filled with people, and when we finally passed on we were fol- 
lowed by the cheers of the crowd. A few minutes more, and we glided 
under the Bridge of Sighs, white and ghostly in the starlight, and out 
into the Grand Canal again. 

Two big, gaily-lighted boats containing musicians were stationed in 
mid-stream, just in front of St. Mark's Square. We hastened towards 
one of them, and joined the throng of gondolas which surrounded it. 
The musicians sang many national songs, among them "Adios Xapoli," 
"Santa Lucia" and "Funicoli Funicula" (the latter bringing fond 
recollections of St. Mary's Glee Club). Every few minutes a man 
would jump lightly from gondola to gondola with a saucer in his hand, 
into which we dropped ten or twenty "centimes" each. Finally we 
moved away to the other boat, where we saw a little dancing and heard 
some music from the opera "Carmen." Before very long, however, we 
realized that it was growing late, and were obliged to turn our gondolas 
in the direction of the Grand Hotel, and with many sighs of regret we 
stepped from the gondolas onto the hotel porch again. 



A Little Shepherd of Judea. 

( A Christmas Storv. ) 



The little shepherd drew his cloak more tightly around him, and 
snuggled closer to his dog, for the wind that swept down from the hills 
was piercing cold. The boy looked down upon the plain below where 
very silent under the clear, cold stars lay the little town of Bethlehem, 
asleep in the shadow of the hills. The streets were quiet now, but 
during the day they had been thronged with strangers who had come 
to be taxed. He himself had shown some late travelers, for whom 
there was no room in the already overcrowded inn, to a stable where 
they had been able to obtain shelter fur the night. Then, hugging his 
dog tightly (for this d<>g was his dearest friend), the little shepherd 
turned from looking on the plain and began to count the twinkling stars, 
and to wonder and to make stories about them ; for in this way he 
passed the long hours. Seated at a little distance from him was a 
group of other shepherds, and snatches of their conversation and their 



142 The St. Mary's Muse. 



light laughter came down to him on the wind. Suddenly there came 
a sound of music, and then a great brightness, so that the little boy hid 
his face in his cloak and dared not look for fear ; and then he heard a 
wonderful song, very sweet, which grew fainter and fainter, and 
finally died away. For a long time he lay stunned, then he raised him- 
self slowly and looked around ; everything was quiet and dark as 
before ; there was no light, no music, only the light of the stars on the 
wind-swept hills and the music of the wind in the trees. He won- 
dered if he had not been dreaming; but still there rang through his 
head a fragment of the song he had heard, "Peace — and good will." 
He arose and went over to the other shepherds. They were huddled 
together and talking excitedly ; as he came towards them one pointed 
over towards Bethlehem and there, above the stable to which the day 
before he had directed the travelers, hung the most wonderful star the 
little shepherd had ever seen. 

"Come," said one of the shepherds, "let us go now to Bethlehem and 
bee if what the angels have spoken be true. For they have told us 
that this day, in Bethlehem, is born a Saviour who is Christ the Lord." 
And so they hurried down across the frozen hills till they came to the 
stable over which hung the wonderful star. They went in, and found 
the King, lying in a manger with his sweet-faced mother bending over 
him, and they fell down and worshipped him, and the little shepherd, 
scarcely understanding what he did, worshipped also. 

The next night the little shepherd lay and watched the great glowing- 
star above the humble stable which sheltered the King ; and he won- 
dered at all that had happened. After that, each day, he crept clown 
from the hills, and looked shyly in at the stable door, and slipped away 
without being seen, and each night he watched the star. One night 
he saw far down the road that leads from the east into Bethlehem three 
figures approaching. Even though they were very far away he could 
tell by the rolling gait at which they came that they were mounted upon 
camels. As they came closer the little shepherd grew more interested, 
and crept down to watch them. They went straight to the stable under 
the great star. There they dismounted, and he saw that they were 
richly attired in Eastern embroideries, but that their garments were 
soiled by travel, showing that they had come a long way. They 



The St. Mary's Muse. 143 

entered the stable, and the little shepherd slipped in behind them, un- 
observed. The three travelers knelt before the little King, and offered 
to Him rich and costly sifts — gold and frankincense and myrrh — and 
they bowed low and worshipped Him, then they rose and mounted their 
camels, and rode away again into the night. 

The next morning the little shepherd went to his mother and told 
her that he wished to bring a gift to the little King. 

"But, little son," said his mother, "there is nothing you can give : 
for we are very poor, and have nothing worthy to be given to the King 
of Israel." 

She thought a moment and then said : 

"What do you value most, little son V 

And the little shepherd answered without a falter, 

"My dog." 

His mother smiled. 

"Then that, the thing you value most, will be the gift most accept- 
able." 

It seemed very hard to the little shepherd, because he loved his dog 
dearlv, and davs without him would be lonely indeed. 

But at last, with his dog clasped in his arms, he went straight to the 
manger where lay the little King, and at the sight the Baby cooed, and 
the dog licked the tiny hand gently, and the little shepherd stood with 
wonder in his eves. 



144 The St. Mary's Muse. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 

Amelia Sturgeon and Janie Sims, Editors. 



AAiss Sherwin's Recitol 
We quote the following from the News and Observer: 

The brilliant recital by Miss Marjory Sherwin was a further proof to the people 
of Raleigh that this gifted violinist is an artist of exceptional ability. The strength 
and authority with which she attacks difficult passages, making them seem mere 
child's play; the breadth and virility, the brilliant execution and, above all, the 
interpretation of the varied program, revealing a marvelous insight into the com- 
poser's intention, made an evening of delight for the audience. Miss Luney lent 
artistic aid with the accompaniments. The Saint-Saens number, a "minuet" and 
gavotte from Septette, op. 65, was an attractive number of the program. The in- 
strumentation is interesting and unusual, the viola frequently speaking the theme, 
and the trumpet being employed with telling effect. The players were in full sym- 
pathy, and the effect was charming. 

The septette was composed of Mr. James Thomas, first violin; Miss Johnson, second 
violin; Mr. Hagedorn, viola: Miss Luney, cello; Mr. Ray, bass; Mr. Simpson, 
trumpet; Miss Futrell, piano. 

The program follows: 

I. Concerto for violin, op. 64; Allegro, molto appassionata ; Andante; Allegretto 
non troppo; Allegretto molto vivace (Mendelssohn). 

II. Bohemian: (a) Romantic Piece, op. 75 (Dvorak) ; (b) Dance, op. 75 (Dvo- 
rak) ; (c) Perpetual Motion (Xovacek). 

III. (a) Minuet; (b) Gavotte et finale, from Septette, op. 65 (Saint-Saens). 

IV. (a) Melodie-Elegie, op. 10 (Massenet) ; (b) Canzonetta, op. 6 (A. d'Am- 
brosio) ; (c) Elfin Dance, op. 25 (Bazzini). 

V. Hungarian Airs, op. 22 (Ernst). 

Mrs. R. M- Lewis Entertains. 

Mrs. Richard H. Lewis charmingly entertained some St. Mary's 
girls on November 14th in honor of her niece, Miss Sparrow, and Miss 
Finley, from Peace. 

The girls went out to the Lewis country home in a ten-seated carry- 
all, and sang picnic songs all the way. Mrs. Lewis served delightful 
refreshments, which, as the guests were all schoolgirls, it is needless to 
say were greatly enjoyed. Those so fortunate as to be included in 
this delightful occasion were : Sarah Fenner, Anna Strong, Marie 
Thomas, JSTell Lewis, Margaret and Bessie Erwin, Amelia Sturgeon, 
Mary Louise Manning, Amy Winston, Helen Robinson, Hilda Broad- 
wood, Kate Bragaw, Mary Polk McGee, Edna Wood and Mattie Bailey. 

B. S. E. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 145 



"Octavius" Baptized. 

On Thanksgiving day at 4:30 "Octavius" Lay was baptized in the 
chapel by the Eight Reverend Joseph Blount Cheshire. He was chris- 
tened "Thomas Atkinson" after his great uncle, the revered Bishop. 
It was a singular coincidence that on this same day the chapel of the 
Holy Comforter, the Bishop Atkinson memorial in Charlotte, was used 
for the first time. "Octavius' " god-parents were Frederick Edmund 
Sears, of Concord, New Hampshire (Mr. Stone acting in his stead), 
Joseph Blount Cheshire, Jr., and Mrs. Bennehan Cameron. The "John- 
sonian" Book Club, of which Mrs. Lay is a member, attended the 
ceremony en masse, they having suggested the name whereby "Octa- 
vius" should be called. But the Rector strenuously denies that he 
was influenced in so momentous a question as the naming of his young- 
est by so cognastic an organization as the Johnsonian Book Club. 

Mrs. Andrews Entertains. 

On Thanksgiving Day from 3 :30-5 :30 Mrs. Wm. Andrews enter- 
tained about fourteen St. Mary's girls most delightfully. Each girl 
was requested to bring a symbol of that for which she was most thank- 
ful, and the game of guessing what was represented by these symbols 
proved very amusing. Edna Wood, the most successful contestant, 
was awarded a beautiful picture, and Ruth Critz, making the next 
best record, won the second prize, "The Rosary," while Hortense Jones 
was "consoled" by a beautiful silver belt buckle. But the most enjoy- 
able part of the afternoon came when the guests were invited into the 
dining room, where the great table fairly groaned with good things 
characteristic of Thanksgiving. The fortunate guests were : Miss 
Thomas, Anne Eield, Evelyn Maxwell, Olive Smith, Bessie Arthur, 
Millian Green, Hortense Jones, Mary Owen, Edna Wood, Elise Smith, 
Rebecca Wood, Mattie Bailey, Tissie Harrison and Ruth Critz. 

R, R. C. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stone Entertain. 

As most of the readers of The Muse know, there is some advantage 
in being a "Faculty," and this advantage was indeed keenly felt 
Saturday night, the twenty-sixth of November, when Mr. and Mrs. 
Stone entertained the entire facultv at their home. Far from being; a 



146 The St. Mary's Muse. 

stupid, formal affair, it was a delightful, comfortable evening's enjoy- 
ment. That which appealed to us all the moment we entered were 
the cheerful open fires, for there is nothing that makes you feel more 
at home than a grate fire. 

The chief entertainment was "A Literary Love Tale," and, like most 
love tales, it kept you guessing. In fact he who knew not the names 
of some twenty-two appropriate books was at sea. Each was given a 
printed document with many blanks where words ought to be. These 
you were to fill in by an appropriate title of a work of the author men- 
tioned in that place. Miss Macaulay proved to be the cleverest at 
this guessing, but, as might be supposed, Miss Thomas was a close 
second; the hopeless effort of the rest of that body which knoweth all, 
will never be known to the world. 

Perfectly delicious refreshments were then served in the dining 
room, and though we hated the thought we found that the hour of ten 
was approaching with incredible speed, and so said "Good-night" and 
came back to St. Mary's in such a happy frame of mind that no lights 
were seen to be still burning. N". Van D. 

The Carnival. 

On the night of Saturday, November 26th, St. Margaret's Chapter 
presented a unique form of entertainment in the shape of a carnival. 
The old dining room afforded an excellent place in which to "pitch the 

tents," and with the criers loudly crying, "This way to the ," etc., 

etc., the joys of the Lair were renewed, on a small scale. There were 
various "side-shows," in one of which the "Only Eed Bat in Captivity" 
was exhibited; there a red brick-bat met the expectant gaze of the 
credulous. In another was advertised the "Great Swimming Match," 
and though one rather wondered how a swimming match could take 
place behind three screens, and on perfectly dry ground, nevertheless 
the attraction was free, and who wishes to miss a free attraction, so in 
went the crowd. There, swimming quietly in a basin of water, was 
the "match." Such was the character of the side-shows, but they 
afforded much amusement, nevertheless. But, though they happened 
to be free, there was no lack of opportunity for spending money. There 
were candy and lemonade, and ice-cream stands, and a grab bag, for 



The St. Mary's Muse. 14" 



which one paid five cents a grab, and a very wild and mysterious- 
looking Gypsy who sat in a dark corner under queer-looking hangings, 
and told fortunes for a penny. Altogether it was a most attractive 
carnival. 

"A Box of MonKeys." 

As there had been so great a dearth of "theatricals" this year, every- 
body hailed with iov the announcement that on Saturday, December 
3d, St. Agnes Chapter would present "A Box of Monkeys." This 
was a comedy in two acts, and a very laughable farce it proved. Helen 
Mc Arthur as "Sierra Bengaline," a prairie rose, was at her best, and 
those of us who know Helen's ability know just how good that is. She 
certainly succeeded capitally in convincing every one that the ways of 
the American girl were "more fun than a box of monkeys." The 
feeble attempts of Katharine Small as "Lady Guinevere Lland-pore" 
to imitate "Sierra" (especially as to slang) were most amusing. Marie 
Thomas as "Edward Ralston," the typical young American, wooed 
"Sierra" with an earnestness which we venture to say would not have 
been quite so pronounced had the character been taken by another than 
Helen. Poor "Chauncey Oglethorpe" (Bessie Arthur), with his ex- 
treme bashfulness, created much laughter, and Bessie Barnwell played 
the part of "Mis' Ordego Jhones," an admirer of wealth, wonderfully 
well. Of course there was an awful mix-up, but it all cleared up, both 
pairs of lovers were united, and the little comedy ended, as all good 
comedies should, with "everybody happy." 

The Peace-St. Mary's Concert Series. 

The series of concerts under the auspices of the Music Departments 
of Peace Institute and St. Mary's School will give the St. Mary's girls 
a splendid opportunity for hearing some of the best musicians of to-day. 

The first of the series was a concert given on the eighth of Decem- 
ber by Madame Corinne Rider-Kelsey, one of the most gifted of Ameri- 
can sopranas, who has gained, in a comparatively short time, a truly 
enviable position among the leading sopranos of the present time. 
Not only was Madame Rider-Kelsey's voice exquisite, but her person- 
ality was such as to give added charm to her performance. 

The second concert will take place in January, given bv Mr. A. V. 



148 The St. Mart's Muse. 



Bowers, pianist. Mr. Bowers is a native of Germany. He studied 
in Leipsig, and was there considered the best interpreter of Beethoven. 
He has been teaching in America for fifteen years, and is now Director 
of Music at Winthrop College, South Carolina. The third of the 
series, in February, will be given by Mr. David Bispham, baritone, 
who for thirteen years has been a member of the Metropolitan Opera 
Company. "Mr. Bispham's intelligence, his wonderful interpretave, 
his wide experience, and his unflagging enthusiasm mark him as the 
foremost American vocalist of either sex — the acknowledged leader of 
the American Lyric Stage." The fourth and last of this series of con- 
certs is, as yet, undecided, but will probably be given by Kathleen Par- 
low, a young Canadian violinist. Kathleen Parlow recently made her 
debut with the Russian Symphony Orchestra and is ranked with the 
famous young violinist, Mischa Elmar. M. C. G. 

"The Egyptian Princess." 

On the night of December the twelfth, Mr. R. Blinn Owen presented 
in the auditorium "The Egyptian Princess," another charming oper- 
etta by the composers of the "Japanese Girl," which was produced so 
successfully last spring under Mr. Owen's direction. 

The scene of the operetta was laid in an open court with a raised 
platform. The court was decorated with palms and rich furnish- 
ings, typical of the early Egyptian period. In the first act a number 
of girls were seen engaged in embroidering banners for the festival to 
be held in honor of the return of the king and his victorious armies 
from a three years war. Alva, an Irish princess stolen from her home 
when a child, was sold as a slave in Gaul, whence she was purchased 
by the King of Egypt as a companion to his only child, Aida. Amuse- 
ment was created throughout by Tabubu, the queen's sister, who was 
always too late. In this act, Herub, a soothsayer, being compelled by 
a number of girls to tell their fortunes, predicted freedom for Alva. 
The second act opened with ISTyssa and Phila, two merry maids of 
honor, reclining on a divan, watching the dancing of a slave. They 
conspired together to play a practical joke on Tabubu, and this was 
very successfully carried out in the course of the act. The king sent 
on certain prisoners in advance of his army, among whom was a cap- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 149 

tive queen, Grania, who recognized in Alva her lost sister. In honor 
of the return of the king and the impending marriage of Aida to a 
neighboring prince, the queen restored Alva and Grania to liberty. 

CONTENTS. 
Act I. 

No. 1. Instrumental Introduction and Chorus. 

2. Song — There's a beautiful isle in the far, far west Alva 

3. Duet and Chorus — Ah! daughter mine Queen and Princess 

4. Patter Song — Now isn't it really extraordinary? Tabubu 

5. Duet — Were I a Prince Princess and Alva 

6. Scene — Whither away so fast? Chorus and Herub 

7. Recit and Recitation — My dearest wish Alva 

8. Bring we flowers. 

9. March. 

10. Chorus to Hathor — Hathor! Hathor! 

No.ll. Dance. Act II. 

12. Duet — Now Phila darling Nyssa and Phila 

13. Chorus — Long live the queen Solo for Queen 

14. Solo — With joy my thankful heart Princess and Chorus 

15. Chorus — Slow advancing. 

16. Recit and Song — Take back the gifts Queen Grania 

17. Chorus — Hail! Hail! joyously hail. 

18. Song — Dear me! this is a surprise Tabubu 

19. Burlesque Incantation Scene Nyssa, Phila and Tabubu 

20. Trumpet Chorus — Ta-ra ta-ra. 

21. Song — Ah! strange indeed the web of fate Alva 

22. Serpentine Dance Patsey Smith 

23. Final Chorus — To greet the king. 

CAST OF CHARACTERS. 

The Queen of Egypt Miss Anna Buxton 

Princess Aida, her daughter Miss Zona Shull 

Princess Tabubu, the Queen's sister Miss Mary Louise Manning 

Herald to the Queen Miss Mary Hoke 

Nyssa )„ . , „ . ... I Miss Hortense Jones 

J Companions to Princess Aida 

Phila ) ( Miss Lucy Harrison 

Alva, a favorite slave Miss Zulette Wilson 

Grania, a captive queen Miss Kate Smith 

Herub, daughter of a wizard Miss Frederika Gilbert 

Chorus of priestesses, slaves, and Egyptian girls, attendants 

to Princess Aida. 

The most unique and attractive feature of the program was the 
"Glow Worm Dance," which came between the acts. "Little Tabubu" 
in this number simply captivated her audience. 



150 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The chorus work was excellent, and the cast such a one as described 
as "all-star." Mr. Owen deserves the thanks not only of the Muse, 
for the benefit of which the operetta was given, but also of the whole 
school for presenting a production so creditable. 

Orchestra Concert. 

On December the fourteenth the semi-annual concert of the St. 
Mary's Orchestra, under the direction of Mr. R. Blinn Owen, and 
upon this occasion assisted by Miss F. Lulette Wilson, was given in 
the auditorium at 8 :30 p. m. The program of this concert was com- 
posed almost entirely of popular numbers, which fact greatly enhanced 
our enjoyment. 

The program was as follows : 

I. "It Happened in Nordland" — Selection Victor Herbert 

II. Intermezzo — "Die Lotosblume" Paul Lincke 

III. "Largo"— Violin Solo Handel-Katz 

Mr. J. J. Thomas, Jk. 

IV. Arioso — "La Mort de Jeanne d'Arc" Bemberg 

Miss Wilson. 

V. Waltz— "Wedding of the Winds" J. F. Hall 

VI. Piece Characteristic — "Cocoanut Dance" A. Hermann 

The Christmas Entertainment 

For some years it has been customary on the night before closing of 
school to have a Christmas entertainment of some description, usually 
a Christmas tree, conducted under the auspices of the Muse Club. 
This year the entertainment was in two parts ; the first part, a per- 
formance by the "little children" in the auditorium at 7 :30. 

Here Katharine Hughes, the dainty fairy of the "Toy Shop" of 
1909, appeared the even daintier "English Daisy," supported by an 
exceedingly sweet chorus ; Lucy Lay, as a little boy, again "starred" 
in recitation ; Elizabeth Telfair was excellent in the "Whistling Song." 
Belle Cameron, as the schoolmaster, dressed in the costumes of the 
'50's, might have stepped down from an old portrait. Josephine 
Williford made a "ripping good" college chap, and brought down the 
house with the spicy "college medley." In "Katie, My Southern 
Rose," the little girls, dressed in their old-fashioned costumes, looked 
very quaint and pretty. If you don't believe that entertainment was 
a great success ask any of the "fond mamas" that were present. 



The St. Maby's Muse. 151 

At the conclusion of the program every one went over to the Art 
Room, where the Christmas tree stood, with its candles and its glis- 
tening ornaments. It was a very pretty tree, and people began to feel 
more Christmas-y upon seeing it. First was sung, "It came upon the 
midnight clear," the hymn that never fails to thrill one at Christmas- 
time. Then the "little children'' joined hands and danced around the 
tree. Xext came Santa Claus with three dancing gnomes in red with 
flowing locks, tooting horns loudly. Then the "hits" were read and 
the candy and presents distributed. The entertainment ended with 
every one singing, u Oh, little town of Bethlehem." Then the crowd 
trooped chattering down the steps, and the " Committee on the Christ- 
mas Entertainment" heaved a sigh of infinite relief. 

Statistics. 

With great excitement, as usual, the statistics have been taken. The 

votes go to show that St. Mary's girls think 

Amelia Sturgeon Most Popular 

Shepherd Leake Best Looking 

Helen McArthur Most Attractive 

Catharine Turner Best Dancer 

Virginia Prettyman Most Athletic 

Zona Shull Most Musical 

Rebecca Wood Most Practical 

Nell Lewis Most Versatile 

Debaters. 
The debaters for the annual Inter-Society Debate have been elected. 
The two from Sigma Lambda are Ruth Critz and Helen McArthur. 
The two from E. A. P. are Patsev Smith and Xell Lewis. 



152 The St. Maey's Muse. 



School Gossip. 



— Miss Thomas and Miss Fenner spent a few days during the first 
week in December with Martha Byrd Spruill in Kocky Mount. 

— Augusta Divine, of Rocky Mount, paid a short visit to her sister, 
Virginia. 

— Helen Robinson enjoyed a visit from her mother and sister, Eloise. 

— Annabel Gray, of Winston, spent a few days at the school as the 
guest of Helen McArthur. 

— Amelia Sturgeon enjoyed quite a pleasant visit to Atlanta, where 
she went to attend the marriage of her sister, Betty, which took place 
at 6 :30 on November 30th at the home of Mrs. Joe Eby {nee Julia 
Rosser), whose name is still familiar at St. Mary's. 

— The Muse expresses with deep regret the fact that Bessie Arthur 
and Hilda Broadwood will not return to School after the Christmas 
holidays. 

—Mr. H. E. Wells, of Columbia, while passing through Raleigh, 
spent a few hours with his daughter, Ruth. 

— Miss Carol Buxton, of Winston, visited her sister, "Miss Buxton," 
for a few days during the latter part of November. 

- — Mrs. William Grant, of Denver, Colo., gave a delightful luncheon 
to a number of girls during her visit to her niece, Millian Green. 
Those so fortunate as to be invited were Miss TJrquhart, Millian Green, 
Amelia Sturgeon, Elizabeth Leary and Gertrude McComb. 

— Hilda Broadwood and Ruth Branham enjoyed visits from their 
mothers. 

— A number of "old girls" spent a few days at the School on their 
way back from Chapel Hill, where they had been attending the dances 
at the University. They were: Lena Everitt, Fanny Dockery, May 
Belle Small, Eloise Robinson, Annie Wood and Ida Rogerson. 

— Mary Shuford spent some time at the School visiting friends. 
— Elizabeth Leary had as her guest for a few days Miss Minnie 
Nicholson, of Washington, N. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 153 



— We are glad to welcome Anna Strong among us as a boarder in- 
stead of a day scholar, as she was formerly. 

— We regret that Lucile Brady had to leave School on account of 
the death of her father. The Muse extends to her its deepest sym- 
pathy in her bereavement. 

— Quite a number of the girls went to hear Mr. James O. Carr's 
address at the Senate Chamber, November 15th. The occasion of the 
address was the presentation to the State of the portrait of Governor 
Davie, which has been recently painted by Mr. Jacques Busbee, of this 
State. 

— Mary Gaither went home for a few days to be present at the mar- 
riage of her sister, Miss Elizabeth Gaither, to Mr. Edmund Conger, of 
Edenton. 

— Mrs. Charles Collier (nee Betty Sturgeon) spent a short time at 
the School as she passed through Baleigh on her bridal tour. 

— Several members of the School intend to spend the holidays at St. 
Mary's. They are Miss Fenner, Miss Sherwin, Miss Wilson, Mrs. 
Gretter, Mary Owen, Helen Scobell, Catharine Turner, Eredrika Gil- 
bert and Zora Shull. 

— Anne Field is spending part of the holidays with Amy Winston 
in Raleigh. 



154 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Timely Topics. 



La Belle Fille Sans Joie 
(After Keats.) 

Oh, what can ail thee, little maid 
Alone and slowly sauntering? 

Thou hast a most unhappy look, 
Poor little thing! 

Ah, what can ail thee, little maid? 

So wistful and so woe-begone? 
A better time will surely come, 

Unhappy one! 

I heard this morn a dreadful thing. 

The Rector said in study hall 
That beauty without exercise — 

No go at all. 

The "L. P." also had her say: 

That exercise henceforth would be 
(As idle moments here abound) 
Compulsory. 

So, though I much prefer to read 
In some sequestered, quiet nook, 

Avowals of undying love 
In some sweet book; 

Or rather to the grill room go, 

And with my friends select and few 

There with much merriment prepare 
A candy stew. 

Yet must I face the cutting wind 
This bitter cold December day, 

And here, though almost frozen — pace 
The hours away. 

So this is why I wander here 

With faltering steps and many sighs, 
Because nine ''units" I must check 

Of exercise. 

L— . 



The St. Mart's Muse. 155 



"St. Mary's Spirit " 

"St. Mary's Spirit' - is a thing 

We hear of all the time, 
And now we must attempt to tell 

Of that school trait in rhyme. 

We must be proper little girls 

To keep that spirit up, 
And not when by excitement fired 

Make gestures with a cup. 

Xo more should we in thoughtless ease 

Recline upon the table 
When we are in the dining room 

And to sit up are able. 

We should not push each other down 

In getting in to meals, 
And near Miss Thomas' office door 

Should not indulge in squeals. 

If we forget, the teachers say, 
That spirit which we cherish 

Through absent-minded carelessness 
Is surely bound to perish. 



— Evelyn Maxwell. 



The Battle Cry. 

A crowd of girlies hurry 

Through the streets at fearful pace; 
A res'lute gleam is in each eye, 

A set look on each face. 

And to the wondering shopper 

That may chance to pass them by 

There rises from the hurrying throng 
This grim, determined cry: 

"We'll pass straight by dear Cally's, 
His luscious fruits we'll spurn, 

And if he speaks of 'Love's Delight,' 
The shoulder cold we'll turn. 



156 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Not the joys of chicken salad, 

Not the last 'Best Seller's' fame, 
Not the charms of Brantley's sherry 

Can our worthy ardor tame. 

Not the most delicious package 

Of the sweets that Royster hath 
Can serve to turn our feet aside 

From duty's rugged path. 

And we'll pass the tempting 'Fashion' 

Without e'en a fleeting look, 
For we're on our way to Tyree's 

To have our pictures took." 

* * * * 

Now as in the dusk of evening, 

Home the girlies wend their way, 
The shopper hears, in passing them, 

The tired damsels say: 

"Oh, we've shown such wild school spirit, 

It would satisfy e'en Crook, 
For we've spent the day at Tyree's, 

But we've had our pictures took." 

— Nell Battle Lewis. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = m e = s Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except In July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, In 
the Interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1910-1911. 

Nell Battle Lewis, Editor-in-Chief. 
Bessie Smedes Erwin, Caroline Clarke Jones, Janie Ruffin Sims, 

Elizabeth Byrd Henderson, Josephine Tonnoffski, 

Elizabeth Hughes, Isabelle Hester Perrt, Rebecca Bennehan Wood. 

Ruth Reynolds Critz. 
Elizabeth Woodard Leary, Business Manager. 
Amelia Pinckney Sturgeon, Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

EDITORIAL. 



Christmas. 

Christmas at last ! Now the last day has been marked off the calen- 
dar, and the holidays are here ! We have sung "On our way rejoic- 
ing," we have kissed our good-byes, have seen our trunks jolted to the 
station — and — are at home again. 

Whoopee, girls ! 

The Muse wishes every one a very merry Christmas, and a very 
happy New Year. 



New Year. 



At this season of New Year there comes to us a thought by no means 
comforting: as we look back over the year that is gone we can see 
nothing, or at most very little, that has been accomplished ; and we 
think how that at each new year we have looked back over the old 
year, full of mistakes and failure and wasted effort, and have begun 
with many good resolutions, the new one, only to meet with the same 
disappointing result. But perhaps in the passing year something has 
been gained, something so imperceptible that we can not recognize it as 



158 The St. Mary's Muse. 

a gain, but which in time will show itself. Though it is very true that 
the same opportunity rarely comes twice, nevertheless it is one of the 
blessings of life that fresh opportunities are always presenting them- 
selves. So there remains for us the comfort of knowing that before us 
stretches a year full of such opportunities, a year as yet unstained and 
unblotted, full of the promise of better things — and we can take hold 
afresh and begin all over again. 



The Annual. 

Owing to the fact that there was a considerable question as to 
whether or not there could be an Annual in 1911, the Muse Club was 
very glad to announce that a plan had materialized which insured the 
publication. The Annual this year will not be as large a book as has 
been published in the last three years, owing to the omission of the 
ephemeral clubs which exist for only a day (the day in which they go 
into the Annual). But The Muse will, of course, contain all the 
recognized organizations of the school, and really promises to be, in 
many respects, the best Muse yet : certainly the binding and printing 
will be more artistic than that of any Annual published heretofore. 
But the most attractive thing about this year book of 1911 is that it 
will be in the hands of the "gentle reader" by the first of March. 
ISTow, who says the class of 1911 isn't a hustler? 



Coming Up! 

In this number of The Muse we publish, for the first time this 
year, poems which have been contributed by girls other than the mem- 
bers of the Muse Board. "Poetry" has been our cry. We have sighed 
ofttimes for another Bailey or Pickel with their mild philosophy, a 
romantic ISTewbold, a Deaton, excelling in nature description, or a 
DuBose to attempt anything from love lyrics to doggerel. But now, 
the prospect brightens. You know the duration of heaviness is claimed 
to be but for a night and "joy cometh in the morning." Well, we 
believe (to grow extremely figurative) that the morning is breaking — 
our poets are in sight. 

Seriously, though, The Muse does want contributions from the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 159 

girls. The Board can't write The Muse from cover to cover. The 
Board is smart enough, but that's not the question. As every one 
knows, The Muse does not aim primarily to be a literary magazine; 
but a certain amount of '"literature" is not only necessary but most 
desirable. "Timely Topics," stories, sketches, all are most welcome 
and most earnestly solicited. 



The Call of the South for the College-bred Woman. 

There is no greater need of the college-bred woman in the South 
than in the East or the Xorth or the West. Everywhere where higher 
development, mental or moral, is sought, there is the need of the col- 
lege woman. But in the South, more perhaps than in any other part 
of the country, is there lack of the realization of the necessity of the 
woman who is well educated, lack of the realization of the good which 
she alone can accomplish. 

The object of all education is twofold: first, to enhance the indi- 
vidual's appreciation of life, so that he live a wider life than he other- 
wise could ; second, to so develop his powers and faculties of mind that 
he be better fitted to cope with problems that confront him, to enable 
him to put more into life, thus making his life more useful. It is 
acknowledged that the development of the individual is at the root of 
the development of the community, the State, the nation. Especially 
is the development of the woman at the root of that of the home, which 
is the unit upon which everything else depends, the axis about which 
evervthing else revolves. Though the duties of a woman are vastly 
different from those of a man, nevertheless she should be allowed, along 
her own lines, the proper development which only a college education 
can insure. 

The South, since the war, has been backward in all educational 
issues. Perhaps it is because the ideal of the woman of the South as 
she used to be has been so fondly cherished, and because the South 
seemingly is afraid that the college education of her women will shat- 
ter that ideal, that there is so little sympathy with the "college idea." 
But there comes, as progress advances, the necessity of a modification 
of ideals. The woman that the Xew South needs is not less womanlv 



160 The St. Maey's Muse. 

than her sister of the "old days," but she is better educated, better 
trained, more fit for the problems of the present, a woman whose 
horizon is broadened and whose outlook on life is inestimably wider 
than it has ever been before. The development of woman has gone 
hand in hand with the advancement of the times until, from the slave 
of barbarous times, she has risen in the present state of civilization, to 
man's moral and intellectual equal. This — her higher education — is 
but another great step forward. 

Assuming that the aim of the South is to produce the best type of 
woman, certainly the present education of the Southern girl is not 
conducive to the fulfillment of that aim. Her education consists of a 
few French phrases, and a very inadequate knowledge of a few of the 
classics of her mother tongue, procured at an inefficient, fashionable 
boarding school. She also learns to play the piano, back gracefully out 
of a drawing-room, step into a cab without tripping over her gown, and 
having been "polished" to a satisfactory finish, comes home to her fond 
parents, charming, expensive, and absolutely useless. On the other 
hand, the college education is a thorough, sound, practical one. At 
college the girl's ambition and aspiration are stirred and stimulated, 
and her powers for activity are strengthened by modern knowledge and 
training in systematic work and habits of thought. College produces 
the thinking woman, while the present inefficient education produces, 
in the majority of cases, the woman, devoid of the ability for serious 
thought. 

Some claim that a college education tends towards discontentment. 
But discontentment is at the root of all achievement, the motive power 
of all advancement; and there can be no greater curse than self- 
contentment, when conditions should be improved. 

The South needs the college-bred woman because she is the best 
developed woman, the woman who will best conduct the home, and 
indirectly lift the nation itself in exact proportion to her own greater 
development. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumme Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

HONORARY VxCE.PRESXr.ENTS - {^f^^SSSS^ 

President - Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - - - - Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 

Secretary ... - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer ... - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 

Field Secretary ... Miss Mary F. Henderson, Salisbury. 



Alumnae Marriages. 

There are a number of weddings of St. Mary's girls chronicled in 
this Muse, many of them of more than nsnal interest. 

The Muse extends felicitations to the brides from their Alma Mater 
and wishes the brides and grooms life-long happiness. 

Conger-Gaither. 

(From the Xews and Observer.) 

Hertford, N. C, Nov. 3. — A very beautiful marriage was solemnized in Holy 
Trinity Church here yesterday at noon, when Miss Elizabeth Wood Gaither, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Win, G. Gaither, became the bride of Mr. Edward Chaimberlaine 
Conger, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Conger, of Edenton, Rev. B. S. Lassiter. rector 
of the church, officiating. 

The church was unusually beautiful with decorations of palms, ferns, white chry- 
santhemums and roses. Instead of ribbons, gates of white chrysanthemums were 
exquisitely arranged. The wedding march was beautifully rendered by Miss Emily 
Skinner, the church organist. 

Mrs. Burnett Lewis, a sister of the bride, was matron of honor, and Mr. W. G. 
Gaither, of Elizabeth City, a brother of the bride, acted as best man. The brides- 
maids were: Miss Francis Broadfoot, of Fayetteville, and Misses Katherine Leigh' 
Winslow and Janie Blanchard, of this place. Messrs. R. Graham White, John G. 
Wood, Jr., of Edenton, and T. J. Nixon, Jr., and W. B. Hudson, of this place, were 
the groomsmen. 

Mr. and Mrs. Conger left on the afternoon train for a tour of a fortnight in the 
larger cities of the East. They will make their home in Edenton, where Mr. Conger 
was reared and where he is known and very popular with quite a large circle of 
friends. Mrs. Conger is one of Hertford"s most popular young women, and there 
was no more beautiful girl in our town. She is a woman of many lovely traits of 
character and her disposition is attractive. The well wishes of the entire com- 
munity go with her. 



162 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Hargett-Sabiston. 

(From the 'News and Observer.) 

Jacksonville, N. C, Nov. 7. — A wedding of more than local interest was solemnized 
Wednesday evening, November 2, at 8 o'clock, when, in a very pretty and impressive 
ceremony by Rev. W. L. Cuninggim, Miss Leila May Sabistoh, the accomplished 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Sabiston, became the bride of Mr. Fred W. Hargett, 
one of Jacksonville's most popular and prominent young business men. 

The Sabiston home was attractively decorated with Southern smilax, autumn 
leaves, palms and cut flowers. 



Collier-SturgeoQ. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Ferdinand Wilkinson 

announce the marriage of their sister 

Miss Elizabeth Combs Sturgeon 

to 

Mr. Charles Allen Collier 

on Wednesday, November the thirtieth 

nineteen hundred and ten 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

"Bettie" Sturgeon, one of the most popular girls of 1905-06, is the 
younger sister of Miss Mary Sturgeon, now Mrs. T. F. Wilkinson, of 
Gary, and the elder sister of Amelia Sturgeon, of the present. She has 
spent the past four years in Atlanta, where she met Mr. Collier, and 
where she will in future make her home. 



Lawrence-Welles. 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Page Welles 
announce the marriage of their daughter 
Mary Sabra 
to 
Mr. Schuyler Lawrence 
Wednesday, November the thirtieth 
nineteen hundred and ten 
At Home Towanda. Pennsylvania, 

after January first, 
Calle 39, No. 116, 
Chihuahua, Mexico. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 163 



"Mary Welles" was one of the ''Pennsylvania girls" of 1903-04, who 
played a prominent part in the school-life of that year. She has since 
made several visits to Raleigh as the guest of Miss Fannie Hines John- 
son. She sent her greetings to the Alumnae last spring from Mexico, 
where she was then visiting, and now she goes to Mexico to live. 



Long-Burg wyr). 

Mr. and Mrs. Henrv Kins; Burswyn 

invite you to be present 

at the marriage of their sister 

Miss Minnie Greenough Burgwyn 

to 
Dr. Thomas Williams Mason Long- 
on Wednesday evening, December the seventh 
nineteen hundred and ten 

at eight o'clock 

The Church of the Saviour 

Jackson, Xorth Carolina. 

"Minnie Burgwyn" is a member of the well-known class of 1904 
and was a conspicuous figure in the St. Mary's life during the last 
years of Dr. Bratton's administration and the first year of Mr. DuBose. 
She has since kept up with St. Mary's affairs and is known to many 
present-day St. Mary's girls. 



DameroQ-Jones. 

Mrs. Adele Evans Jones 

requests the honour of your presence 

at the marriage of her daughter 

Mattie Wiggins 

to 

Mr. William Henry Dameron 

Wednesday, the twenty-first of December 

at noon 

Emmanuel Church 

Warrenton, ]STorth Carolina. 



164 The St. Maey's Muse. 

"Mattie Jones" was at St. Mary's from 1902-04, and has since paid 
a number of visits to the School. She is a cousin of Elise Smith, who 
was present at the wedding. 



Wilsoo-Morrill. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence V. Morrill 

invite you to be present 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Olive 

to 

Mr. Derward Saunders Wilson 

Lieutenant United States Army 

on Tuesday evening, the twenty-seventh of December 

one thousand nine hundred and ten 

at six o'clock 

St. Barnabas Episcopal Church 

Snow Hill, Xorth Carolina. 

"Olive Morrill" was a poj^ular member of St. Mary's in 1903-05, 
and through her connection with the Russ's, of Raleigh, has kept up 
with School affairs by visits to Raleigh. As Mrs. Wilson she will make 
her home at Tort McPherson, Ga., where Lieutenant Wilson is sta- 
tioned at present. 



Cotfyrao-hjowe 

Mrs. Annie Wilson Howe 

requests the honour of your presence 

at the marriage of her daughter 

Annie Wilson 

to 

Mr. Perrin Chiles Cothran 

on the afternoon of Saturday, the thirty-first of December 

at half after five o'clock 

First Presbyterian Church 

Princeton, Xew Jersev. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 16." 

''Annie Howe'' is a cousin of "Nell Wilson," of Princeton, and a 
niece of Professor Howe, of Chapel Hill. She was at St. Mary's 
parts of two years as a day-pupil, and is very pleasantly remembered. 



Alumnae Notes. 



Master John Carroll Mann, accompanied by his mother {nee "Miss 
Cribbs"), paid his respects to the School for the first time on Novem- 
ber 11th, and was very warmly received by both teachers and girls. 

The death of Mrs. William Eoulhac (Maria Webb, '03-01), of Hills- 
boro on November 11th was a shock and brought much sorrow to a 
host of friends. She was a bride of less than a year. 

Miss Checkley sends a copy of the 1910-11 Announcement of The 
Cathedral School, Havana, of which she has been the Principal since 
leaving St. Mary's in 1905. The school has prospered and grown 
much, until there are now three departments and eleven instructors. 



READ !— M ARK I -ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



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$2.50 to others. 

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Why is Brantley's Fountain the Most Popular ? 
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Art Store 
11 West Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 



WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 

Phone 953-R 

217H Fayetteville Street 



N. H. MOORE 

Repairer of Fine Shoes 

Fas'etteville Street 



MISS SMITH 

DRESSMAKER 

Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



DARNELL & THOMAS 
Music House 

Established 1887 

Pianos, Organs, Small Instruments, Sheet 
Music and Instruction Books 



Raleig-h, 



North Carolina 



MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 
OF RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital $100,000.00 4 per cent paid in Savings 

Department 
E. C. Duncan, Pres. W. B. Drake, Jr., Cash. 

A. H. FETTING 

Manufacturer of Greek Letter Fraternity 

Jewelry, 213 N. Liberty St., Baltimore, Md. 

Factory: 213 Little Sharp St. 

4®* Memorandum package sent to any fraternity 
member through the Secretary of Chapter. Special 
designs and estimates furnished on class pins, rings, 
medals for athletic meets, etc. 




CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 



Electric Light 
and Power 



Both Phones: 



•={ 



174 

226 



The Yarborough House 

invites your patronage 



A visitor, walking one day through the grounds of an insane asylum, 

was thus accosted by an inmate : 

"You haven't a piece of toast about you, eh, sir ?" 

"JSTo," the gentleman replied, "I'm very sorry, but I haven't." 

"Well," said the inmate sadly, "I'm a poached egg, and I'm very 
tired. I wanted a place to sit down." 



k i n,g 'S grocery, 

"The Little Store." 



E. M. UZZELL & CO. 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

only high grade work 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

INSURANCE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE 
Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 
THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 



SEND TO 

Plummer's Stables 

For Riding and Driving Horses 

YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. PULLEN, 
Pres., Chas. Root, Cashier. Capital and Surplus 
$75,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 



Advertisements. 



Herbert Rosenthal 



LADIES' FINE SHOES 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 



INSURE IN THE 

Jefferson Standard Life Ins, Go. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Strongest in the South 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 
COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 



131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 



COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 



5 West Hargett St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE J. D. RI66AN COMPANY 

CANDY — CHINA — TOYS 

PICTURES STATIONERY 



OISTE DOLLAE pays for the Muse for a year (ten numbers). 

Send the Dollar JTOW. 



NORFOLK 

OYSTE RS 

DAILY 

Wade's Fish Market 

113 E. Martin St . Both Phones 356 


J. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 


ROBERT SIMPSON 

DRUGGIST AND PRESCRIPTIONIST 


H. T. HICKS & COMPANY 

For Toilet Requisites and 
Colds Drinks 


GOOD THINGS ALWAYS AT 


BRETSCH'S BAKERY 


ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 


EAT 
BETTS' ICE CREAM 


RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



POOL & CROCKER 

up-to-date 
FOOTWEAR 

Special Attention to Fit 

105 Fayetteville St. 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 



AND SODA FOUNTAIN 



Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 
President. Treasurer. 



G. H. DORTCH, 

Secretary. 



R. S. BUSBEE, 
General Manager. 



Sample copies of the Muse will be mailed 
to Alumnae at any time on request. 



Dr. L. J. PEGRAM 

DENTIST 
Office 209% Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. C. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
College Postals 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King'Crowell 



M. ROSENTHAL 
X CO. 

GROCERS 



WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING NOTHING 
EXCEEDS THE 

GAS RANGE 

Always Ready. No Dirt. No Ashes 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the Welsbach, "The Light that Does 
Not Flicker." 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 


SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located at 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th Sts., Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 


T. W. BLAKE 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware 
Repairing promptly done 


watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 


Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 





"YOURS FOR HEALTH" 

WEST DISINFECTING COMPANY 

S. S. SELIG, Jr., General Sales Agent. ATLANTA, GA. 

LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF DISINFECTANTS IN THE WORLD 



If you see a man walking 

At leisurely pace, 

Just loafing along 
With a smile on his face — 
He started on time, 3 t ou will find. 
Another comes scurrying, 

Hurrying, worrying, 

His face all awry 
And an outstanding eye — 
He started a little behind. 

All the leisure in life, 

All the pleasure in life, 
Belongs to the man that's on time. 



NORFOLK -SO UTH ERN RAILWAY 

New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

Express train service between Raleigh, Wilson, Greenville, Goldsboro, Kinston, 

New'Bern, Morehead City, Washington, Plymouth, Elizabeth City, 

Virginia Beach and Norfolk, Virginia. 



VIA NORFOLK TO NORTH AND EAST 
VIA RALEIGH TO SOUTH AND WEST 

6 









Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Marts School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women). 



69th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 15, 1910. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 26, 1911. 



St. Mary's 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

3. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



offers instruction in these 

Departments: j 4. THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1910-11 are enrolled 225 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector. 



i 



Zhc 



St. flfcar^'s fllbuee 



->> 



•> .. 




.» 



]fet»ruar?, ten 



IRaleigb, m. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

MID=YEAR NUMBER. 
Vol. XV. February, 1911. No. 6. 

The King's Gifts. 



CORNELIA FRANCES LOOMIS. 



"I have come for the myrrh," the angel said, 

"For the frankincense and gold, 
For your gifts to lay 'round the kingly bed, 

As the wise men did of old. 
Each Christmas Eve I come to bring 
The gifts of the world to the infant King." 

Then silence fell, and the wavering flame 
Lay soft on the heads of the ancient pair, 

As they bowed them low in the deepest shame 
At the thought of the little they had to share. 

"We have nothing," they said, "for you to bring, 

Nothing at all for the baby King." 

Then the angel smiled, and opened his book 

Where the list of gifts was given: 
"Your names," he said, with a holy look, 

"Are writ on the Rolls of Heaven; 
There is nothing more you need to bring, 
Till you come yourselves to worship our King." 

"The gold," he said, "is your loving deeds 

That have marked the passing years, 
And the myrrh, your grief for the sad world's needs, 

For others' sorrows and tears, 
And the frankincense is your prayers that ring 
Forevermore round the throne of your King." 

He closed his book and left them there 

In the light of the dying fire; 
Then the star stole in, like a silent prayer, 

And they heard the distant choir 
Calling to them to come and bring 
Their gifts, themselves, to the new-born King. 



168 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Legend of the Crystal Stream. 



MARGARET STRANGE BROADFOOT. 



In a fair, far-off land there flows a crystal stream. It is a sparkling, 
laughing stream, and in the day the sunbeams kiss its ripples, and in the 
calm of the soft spring nights the silver stars lie glimmering on its 
breast. Sometimes fair girls come to it and smile back at the reflection 
of their own glad looks, and lovers in the young spring lie on its banks 
and listen to its murmur. Where this stream now flows was once but 
a pleasant meadow land ; and this is the story of how the stream sprang 
up in a night ; this is the legend of the Crystal Stream that is told to the 
wondering youth of the land. 

There dwelt in the Land of Unfulfilled Desire a princess whose eyes 
haunted one with the mystery of unshed tears. All her life she had been 
a very happy princess until one night as she slept an angel from the 
Land of Crowned Endeavor in passing had touched her with the tip of 
his saffron wing, and she had seen a vision, fleeting, beautiful. After 
that ofttimes there arose in her heart strange longing for joys that she 
dared not name. And from that day men called her Ignania, or the 
Princess with the Heart-afire. Before that she had never dreamed of 
the Struggle, but because, by the brush of the angel's wing vague long- 
ings had been aroused in her heart, she was never again content. 

Then the princess took up the Struggle for the Creation of a Perfect 
Thing, and as she strove, she came to see that in the throngs of men 
around her, there were others whom before she had thought of only as 
idle and pleasure loving, that were striving like herself, others whom 
the angel with the saffron wings had waked. Many things the princess 
attempted, but in none of them could she succeed. Then she decided 
that she would go to the three who, of all that like herself were striving, 
seemed to have found the secret of the Creation of the Perfect Thing. 

And so first she went to a famous artist who was painting a flower. 
And all the world said of the painting, "How perfect ! It is the flower 
made eternal with colors that can not fade." The princess looked and 
saw no flaw. Then she turned to the sad-eyed artist and said : 

"Tell me the secret of the Creation of the Perfect." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 169 

And the artist sighed and answered : 

"Because you too have striven I will tell you something that no one 
else shall ever know. Once as I painted, on the clear white of the petal, 
I dropped a drop of burning red; and because my colors do not fade 
there was no way in which it could be erased. But I painted over and 
over it with white, and so now, because it was done cleverly, the world 
sees no defect, but in my heart of hearts I know that the flaw is there. 
Look closely." 

Then the princess looked closely and she could see the faint, faint 
mark, scarcely discernible. 

Then Ignania went to a great good priest whose life was free from 
lust and hate and base deceit and of whom all the world said, "His is a 
perfect life." So she came to him and said : 

"Tell me the secret." 

And the priest answered: 

"Because you are young and eager-eyed, and have great hope, I will 
tell you what I have long kept hidden. The world thinks my life per- 
fect, but that is because the world can not see within. But there is a 
great stain on my heart that nothing can ever cleanse : the blood of a 
friend." 

So the princess left the priest and went to a mechanic who had in- 
vented a wonderful machine. And all the world said of it, "This is a 
perfect thing." 

So Ignania said to the mechanic : 

"Tell me the secret." 

And he answered : 

"You see the great wheel that revolves there. At every millionth 
revolution there is a catch, and the mechanism is stopped, but only for a 
fraction of a second. And because the world does not discern it, it says, 
'This is a perfect thing.' " 

Then the princess sighed and went back to her father's palace. 

Now because the princess Ignania was young she believed that though 
all others had failed she could create the Perfect Thing, and so she set 
herself to weave a cloak of finest texture that should hold the glimmer 
of the moon-lit sea, and the gray of the dawn, and the gold of the sun- 



170 The St. Mary's Muse. 

kissed daffodil, and the azure of the sky, and the green of the young 
leaves in spring. And this cloak should be a perfect creation. 

The princess worked until the suns of a hundred days had set, and 
at last the cloak was finished. Then she held it up and cried : 

"At last ! I of all the world have created the Perfect Thing. For in 
this cloak there is the glimmer of the moon-lit sea, and the gray of the 
dawn, and the gold of the sun-kissed daffodil, and the azure of the sky, 
and the green of the young leaves in spring." And she was very glad. 
So she said : 

"I will show it to the artist and the priest and the mechanic." 

And she set out. As she hurried through a little strip of wood, she 
felt the cloak catch on a twig by the way, and as she stopped to untangle 
it she pulled it ever so slightly, and lo ! the silken threads began to ravel, 
and in a moment what before had been the wonderful cloak lay at her 
feet, a mass of shimmering, fairy-tinted threads of silk ; for, alas, in 
the weaving the princess had dropped a stitch. 
But she said: 

"I will begin again tomorrow, and this time there shall be no flaw." 

That night she slept deeply, and in the morning she was awakened 
by the soft lapping of waters ; and she went out into the freshness of the 
morning and found a gentle stream flowing through the valley ; from the 
depths of the stream a voice said : 

"Ignania, you are the Spirit of Eternal Youth with the Heart-afire. 
This stream springs from the tears that in defeat and disappointment 
you have not shed. Follow it until it widens by the silver birches. 
There is a barge ; and it shall float you through the young morning on 
towards the Land of Crowned Endeavor, and you shall dwell no longer 
in this land where dreams are never realized, and where desires remain 
forever unfulfilled." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 171 



Some Brief Recollections of Nag's head. 



BY ONE WHO HAS HAD THE EXPERIENCE. 



Editor's Note. — As may have been noticed by the readers of The Muse, it has been the aim of the 
Board to publish in each issue of the magazine some travel sketch: that is, a sketch of a country practi- 
cally unfamiliar to the readers. We do not think it unfitting, therefore, to publish the following under 
that series, as it seems to us to meet the requirements mentioned above; as it is a sketch, though not of a 
far-distant land, nevertheless one probably unfamiliar to the majority of readers. 

In a number of The Muse issued perhaps as long as two years ago 
there appeared a short sketch telling how Nag's Head received its name. 
And though the story is an interesting one, nevertheless, it would be vain 
repetition to speak of it now. And there is no lack of interesting things 
about Nag's Head. In the first place, I suppose that everybody knows 
where Nag's Head is, but for the benefit of the few who may be ignorant, 
I will locate it rather indefinitely. It is situated on a narrow strip of 
land on the eastern coast of North Carolina, with the Albemarle Sound 
on one hand and the Atlantic Ocean on the other. It is in that part of 
the Old North State familiarly known to all good Tar Heels as "God's 
country, or the glorious east." It is a favorite summer resort for people 
from Edenton, Hertford, Elizabeth City, etc. 

Now, the chief charm of Nag's Head is the atmosphere of perfect 
freedom from unnecessary conventionalities, that exists there. There 
is a familiar saying to the effect that you either dislike Nag's Head most 
bitterly, or else you simply adore it ; and that is usually true. I came 
very near deciding that my fate would be the former when I first caught 
sight of the place. Nothing but sand, sand, sand, with a few scrubby 
trees and weather-beaten cottages at intervals. My heart sank. Was 
this the place I had heard those girls rave over ? But as the boat neared 
the landing my spirits revived somewhat. It appeared to be quite a 
civilized place after all, for the pier was crowded with summer boarders, 
etc. Almost the first thing I was told on landing was that "This was 
the 'Sound Side,' and that I mustn't judge Nag's Head by the Sound 
Side." And I would like to pass on that word of warning to any one 
who may go there, for first impressions on the "Sound Side" at Nag's 
Head are pretty apt to be wrong. 

The vehicle in which I was conveyed to my destination was a two- 
wheeled "dump-cart," drawn by a long-suffering horse much plagued by 



172 The St. Mary's Muse. 

sand flies. Now it must be noted that a horse is a rare sight at Nag's 
Head, and a treasure indeed, for walking in sand ankle-deep is far from 
pleasant. It is about a half mile across the strip to the ocean side. 
Here most of the cottages are situated. These cottages are of the rough- 
est character, unplastered, and without window shutters. 

Nag's Head is a very gay place, but with a gayety distinctive, charac- 
teristic. The kinds of parties preferred are watermelon parties and 
marshmallow roasts. The latter are very picturesque affairs with great 
bonfires that light up the sand around and shine on the waves that boom 
unceasingly. But the main event of the day is to go over to the sound 
side in the afternoon for mail, and to "see the boat come in." In the 
middle of the narrow strip of land there is usually water about knee 
deep, and as all the "suitors" go barefooted always, upon all occasions, 
there is often quite a lot of bridge playing going on. 

And oh ! I haven't said a word about the sand hills. Well, if I may 
be allowed to quote, the sand hills are "simply too wonderful for any 
words whatsoever." And I know that the stars seen from those sand 
hills are prettier than they are anywhere else in the world. 

There is one thing about Nag's Head that is especially noteworthy. 
Although it is a narrow strip of land embraced by two bodies of salt 
water, yet in the middle of the strip, far at one end there is a collection of 
fresh ponds, varying in size, the largest being over a quarter of a mile 
across. These ponds are beautiful ; they are of the most exquisite shade 
of blue, and often are covered with water lilies. On the road that leads 
to the Fresh Ponds the scenery changes as if by magic, and instead of 
wastes of sand with scrubby trees scattered at long intervals, you see 
typical mountain scenery. 

There are hundreds and hundreds of other things about Nag's Head 
that one may never hope to describe. The only way to really appreciate 
the charm of the place is to go there. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 173 



The Song of the Siren. 



NELL BATTLE LEWIS. 



Oh, come from the toil of the tossing sea, 

From the rocking ship by the storm winds blown; 
Oh, come to my cave by the restless sea, 

Where I sit and sigh alone. 
Come! Cease from the struggle of Fame's vain quest, 

Forget the hopes of the days to be; 
Come, lay your head on my waiting breast, 

And love with me. 

Here on the rocks, where the wild waves break, 

And the sea wind blows through my golden hair, 
I sing the song of a deathless love, 

In a land where the days are fair. 
Come, cease from the struggle of wasted toil, 

In pursuit of the dreams that will ne'er come true; 
Ah! Can you not see on the shore I stand, 

With my arms stretched out to you? 

But woe to you that heeds my song 

And turns from your course to come to me ; 
For sharp and rough are the hidden rocks 

That lie in the sun-kissed sea. 
But the sailor, tossed in the ship amain, 

Sees only the calm of the smiling beach — 
Ah ! little you know of the rotting wrecks 

And the dead men's bones that bleach ! 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



Isabelle Perry and Bessie Erwin, Editors. 



The Holidays at St. Mary's. 
Misses Wilson, Fenner, Sherwin and Mrs. Gretter, Mary Owen of 
Central America, Helen Scobell of Mexico, Catherine Turner of Ten- 
nessee, and Frederika Gilbert and Zona Shull of Montana spent the 
holidays at the School. The party was augmented by Miss Fenner's 
sister, and Miss Sherwin's brother and sister. We can hardly believe 



174 The St. Maey's Muse. 

our ears when the girls tell us that they slept through breakfast and 
went down town whenever they pleased. 

During the Christmas season the girls were charmingly entertained 
by Mrs. Cheshire. Around the hearthstone with a good log fire every- 
body warmed up and had a real old-fashioned good time. 

Mrs. Lay entertained on the last day of the year. On this occasion 
Miss Fenner and Miss Wilson were the jesters of the evening and did 
much to furnish jollity. 

Miss Fenner wound up the social stunts with a progressive euchre 
party. The dainty prizes painted by the hostess herself will, we know, 
be cherished by the lucky winners. 

"Romeo and Juliet." 
On January 18th a reading was given by Mrs. Hannibal Williams of 
Shakespeare's wonderful tragedy, "Romeo and Juliet." Mrs. Williams' 
reading showed great versatility in the dramatic reproduction of the 
numerous characters. This was the first time in several years that 
there had been a performance of the kind in the auditorium, and it was 
greatly enjoyed. 

Piano Recital. 

On January 9th the second of the Peace-St. Mary's concert series was 

given in the auditorium. This was a recital by Mr. A. Aswold Bauer, 

pianist. The program was as follows : 

I. Sonate — C major, op. 2 (No. 3) Beethoven 

II. Variations — B flat major Schubert 

III. Nocturne — G major, op. 37 (No. 2) ; Ballade — A flat major Chopin 

IV. Evening; Soaring; Why; Whims Schumann 

V. Capriccio Scarlatti-Tausig 

Nina Pergolese-Joseffy 

Scherzo — E minor Mendelssohn 

VI. To Sing on the Waters ; Hark, Hark, the Lark Schubert-Liszt 

VII. Venezia et Napoli Liszt 

Miss Drewry Entertains. 
On the afternoon of Thursday, January 19th, Emmie Drewry charm- 
ingly entertained a number of St. Mary's girls at her beautiful home 
on Hillsboro Street. The dining room was very artistically decorated 
in green and white with white flowers, ferns, green and white ribbon, etc. 
Kathryn Boylan, Josephine Boylan and Louise Wright also acted as 



The St. Mary's Muse. 175 

hostesses, and kept the guests supplied with all kinds of good things to 
eat. Those who were invited to the delightful tea were Mary Louise 
Manning, Amelia Sturgeon, Anne Field, Jennie D. Harris, Margaret 
and Bessie Erwin, Ruth Wells, Helen Robinson, Julia Borden, Caroline 
Jones, Ruth Critz, Marie Thomas, Tinsley Harrison, Ethel Williamson, 
Louise Josey ; and Miss Anna Buxton and Mrs. Carol Lamb Mann. 

Lee's Birthday. 

On January 19th, an inter-society meeting was held in commemora- 
tion of the birthday of General Robert E. Lee. The speaker of the 
occasion was the Hon. Julian S. Carr, of Durham, who is himself a 
Confederate veteran and now a member of the Legislature of this State. 
He was introduced by Hon. R. H. Battle, a trustee of the School. Mr. 
Carr made a very eloquent address, in which he paid the highest tribute, 
to the character of the great leader. Mr. Boyden, the Senator from 
Rowan, made a few remarks, and the meeting closed with the singing 
of "Dixie." 

The Mid-Year Elections. 

The mid-year elections in the two literary societies have been held. 
There were very few changes made. In Sigma Lambda, Elizabeth 
Hughes was elected Vice-President to fill the vacancy caused by Bessie 
Arthur's not returning to school. In Epsilon Alpha Pi, Patsey Smith 
was elected Critic, Millian Green, Corresponding Secretary, Virginia 
Prettyman, Senior Teller, and Susie Mclver, Historian. 

The Commencement Marshals have also been elected. This year the 
chief comes from E. A. n. They are as follows : 

Chief: Elizabeth Leary, EAII. 
2A EAn 

Helen MeArthur, Eebeeea Wood, 

Amelia Sturgeon, Patsey Smith, 

Janie Sims. Nellie Hendricks. 

4 

Concert and Reception. 

On February 2d there was given in the Auditorium, a concert by 
members of the musical faculty, complimentary to the Legislature. 
The program was as follows : 
2 



176 The St. Mary's Muse. 

I. Hejel Kati Hubay 

MISS SHERWIN 

[I. Spanish Romance Sawyer 

MISS WILSON 

III. ( a ) The Swan Saint-Saens 

(6) Hornpipe a l'Inglese Gaillard (1681-1749) 

( c ) Elfin Dance Bazzini 

MISS SHERWIN 

IV. (a) At Parting Rogers 

(b) A Love Note Rogers 

MISS WILSON 

V. Concerto in F minor, op. 69 Hiller 

MISS LUNEY 

(Second piano, Miss Dowd) 
Miss Luney and Mr. Owen, accompanists 

After that a very pretty reception was held in the parlor. This room, 
so well adapted to affairs of this character, was artistically decorated. 
The guests were received at the front door by Miss Hortense Jones and 
Miss Tissie Harrison. They were shown into the school-room, where 
they removed their wraps, by Miss Helen McArthur and Miss Nellie 
Hendricks. Miss Byrd Henderson and Miss Nell Lewis received them 
at the parlor door and introduced them to the receiving line, which was 
composed of Mr. and Mrs. Lay, Bishop and Mrs. Cheshire, Dr. and Mrs. 
Lewis, Miss Katie McKimmon, Miss Dowd, and Mr. Stone. 

Delicious refreshments were served. 

" A fighting Chance." 

The "lovers of the drama" may well be interested in "A Fighting 
Chance," a play to be given by the Muse Club on February 25th. The 
mere title is enough to attract attention. The play is under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Owen, which fact alone is enough to insure its success. It 
is a most attractive little comedy in three acts, the scene being laid in 
the time of the Civil War, at a girls' boarding school in the South. It 
is full of wit and jolly school girl pranks, but there is a thread of mys- 
tery running through it that holds the audience throughout. The cast, 
which is as follows, mav be seen to be "all-star" : Nell Lewis, Helen 
McArthur, Marie Thomas, Hortense Jones, Patsey Smith, Mary Owen, 
Mary Louise Manning, Byrd Henderson, Tissie Harrison, Kathryn 
Parker, Tinslev Harrison. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 177 

hodges-Reynolds Wedding. 

Virginia Reynolds has been one of us so recently that we think it more 
fitting to publish the account of her wedding as an item of school news, 
rather than of alumnae matters. The following is Bessie Barnwell's 
account of the wedding: 

Virginia Reynolds and Benjamin Hodges were married at the Church 
of the Holy Comforter in Sumter, S. C, on December 2Sth, at 5 p. m., 
before a large number of relatives and friends. The bride was charm- 
ingly gowned in white satin with pearl trimmings and carried a large 
bouquet of Bride's Roses. 

The bridesmaids — Misses Julia Reynolds, Bessie Barnwell, Alice 
Childs and Clara Childs — wore white lingerie dresses and carried white 
carnations. The maid of honor was dressed in white satin, and also 
carried white carnations. 

The church was decorated with white flowers and ferns, and the cere- 
mony was performed by the Rev. H. H. Covington. The groom is a 
Harvard man of the class of '10, and is now taking a course at the 
Harvard Law School. 

After the ceremony a reception was given by the bride's parents to 
the bridal party, relatives and intimate friends of the bride. After the 
reception Mr. and Mrs. Hodges left for New York, and after spending a 
short time in that city, went to Cambridge, Mass., where they will make 
their home. 



School Gossip. 



We regret to say that quite a number of the old girls did not return 
after Christmas. They are: Joanna Rogers, Gertrude McComb, Katha- 
rine Small, Margaret Brown, Carrie Peabody, Kate Northrop, Margaret 
Northern, Nan Cuthbert, Edna Wood and Bessie Arthur. 

Anne Field, Jennie D. Harris, Mary Louise Manning, Helen Mc- 
Arthur, Elise Lloyd, Tissie Harrison, Tinsley Harrison, Nina Gibbs, 
Laura Griffith, Dorothy Brown, Katie Ferebee and Martha Harris were 
late returning on account of sickness. 

Shepherd Leak's sister spent a few days at the School with her. 



178 The St. Mary's Muse. 

After, much pleading and anxiety, at last permission was given to go 
to the "Merry Widow." About one-half of the School went. It is 
needless to say that they enjoyed it. The strains of the "Merry Widow 
Waltz" for about a week after were heard often during dancing hour. 

A few of the girls went with Mr. Stone to the Epiphany service at 
St. Augustine. The three wise men and the spreading of the light were 
the main features of this most unique and impressive service. 

Dr. and Mrs. Pridgin (Ila Rountree, '10) paid St. Mary's a short 
visit. All the old girls were delighted to see Ila for the first time in 
her new role. 

On January 22d, St. Mary's heaved a sigh of infinite relief, as the 
agony of examination week was over. 

Beatrice Barton, who had to leave school in November on account 
of illness, was here a few days at the beginning of the year. 

Mr. Hoyt de Shields was here to see Elizabeth Leary early in January. 
Mr. De Shields is well known by reputation in School. 

Nan Taylor and Leone Herbert enjoyed visits from their mothers. 

Mary Gibbs Mitchell's brother and sister paid her a short visit. 

Miss tenner spent examination week in Eayetteville. 

Elizabeth Tarry spent some time at home for her sister's marriage. 

Susan Rawlings enjoyed a visit from her father. 

Bishop Gray, of Southern Florida, made an address at one of the 
Sunday afternoon services in behalf of the endowment of the University 
of the South at Sewanee, Tennessee. 

Quite a number of the girls went to hear Creatore's Band. 

Tissie Harrison has had visits from her father and also from her little 
niece. 

Elizabeth Hughes's mother and father have moved to Raleigh to live. 

Mary Gaither, Virginia Prettyman and Isabelle Perry have enjoyed 
visits from their brothers. 

Mr. Henry Lay, of Telluride, Col., the brother of Mr. Lay, is paying 
a visit at the Rectory. 

Martha and Helen Wright have had a visit from their mother. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 179 

We are glad, as we always are, to have Mrs. Lay's mother, Mrs. Balch, 
with us. 

Susan Bynum, an old St. Mary's girl, who was here in '06-07, paid 
a visit to her friends in School. 

Janie Sims' aunt paid her a short visit. 

Over half of the School had the pleasure of seeing Viola Allen in 
"The White Sister," on January 28th. 

All of us, and especially those of us who heard him before, are looking 
forward eagerly to hearing David Bispham on the 27th of February. 

Everyone has been very much distressed at Miss Thomas's illness. 
But we are delighted to know she is practically well again. 

We are glad to welcome several new girls: Margaret Fletcher, Doro- 
thy Hopkins, Sadie Williams, Alice Gwynn, Mary Taylor and Marie 
Tucker. 



In Lighter Vein. 



Just for pun. 

(Fabula Nominum.) 
Elizabeth Hughes. 

"Say, Arthur, old Mann, times around here are too PolJcey. Shut up 
that awful 'Life of McCaulay' and let's Turn 'er Lucile (loose heel) 
from this Green Hill. We can't Tarry long, but the Wins low, the air 
is Pleasant, and I've never seen a Fuller moon. Herbert Gibbs and 
Willie Harris will think it a Divine plan, and it won't take but two 
Strong Knox at Archey Perry's door to start his Broadfoot going. 
Hoppe 'long, old pal, that's Wright!" 

* * * •* % -x- * * * 

From the college Barn-well supplied with provisions, each Stovall he 
could get in a Bag-well fitted for the purpose, and as if ready for Battle, 
with their Shieds in front, they set out nCross the Lee for Cameron 
Field. First went the Shepherd, with his Crook of Cherry Wood to 
Telfair news of the way ; behind him the Doiud-j Butler, who on account 
of his Taylor-made suit, would Carrie nothing but the Crews of Olive 
oil, and he was afraid that even it would Leal-. The Baker came next, 



180 The St. Mary's Muse. 

bearing in his Woodruff tray that Small but delicious Fowle, familiarly 
known as a rare old Byrd. When the Miller was summoned he was act- 
ing as his own Barber, and said "I haven't used McComb yet," but as 
the crowd was in such a Fitchett, he decided with Grace to Lay down 
his Blount instruments and go. Thereupon they made him take a 
Quince, some Picket, a box of Royster's candy, and the other eatables 
in a Stone jar. The Smith brought up the rear, drawing a sort of cara- 
Vann, which contained all the Kitchin things. He had lots of Ashe 
dust and Sutt-on him, but he did not care at all, as he felt as Luney as 
a Fere-bee. 

" 'Twill never do to Meta spy out here," said the Ruthless Thomas 
Sims, "and I'm sure we wouldn't lose our Merritt for all this lot of 
Grubb." 

"Wells, sir, you're a PrettymanV exclaimed all together. "It's Owen 
to you that we are in this Webb of mischief, and now you're raisin' 
Cain." 

Pullen Park was too far away, so to liVandyne (live and dine) in 
St. Mary's grove, their Eden's garden, they soon settled upon. It all 
went as fine as a dinner at Giersch's, and only one of the Millian girls 
seemed to have roused from her Peaceful sleep. This Virginia Belle 
had H ermine on the words just received from a Northern friend, "Let's 
Lockhart and heart together." With a sudden impulse to Robahsell in 
her Brown silk kimona and Muse awhile in the Silver light at the win- 
dow, she had unconsciously caught from the Broadwood steps below the 
strains of a Carol of the Folk-lore type. It was sad, but it comforted 
her, and in turn she dropped for each a single White Lilly. 

********* 

As a Victor each reached college in safety. The "lark" had been 
Just-for-Fun, and they didn't reGretter thing. 

Late to BreaKfast. 

AnnA C. Strong. 

"Oh, de-ar! I do wonder why people were made so they hate to get 
up ? Looks like most nine hours would be enough sleep for anybody. 
I'd love to be Kip Van Winkle ! Ouch ! I'll turn to a yawn ! 

"Wonder if Agnes is 'wake yet ? Hm ! From all appearances, decid- 
edly not. I don't believe she's moved since I turned off the light last 



The St. Mary's Muse. 181 

night. Agues ! Agnes ! I might as well get up and shake her arc be 
through with it. I see I'll have to do it, sooner or later. O — ch ! I 
guess it's too cold for such. Agues ! ! Will you get up ?" 

"What ?" 

"Yes ; I should say I did call you — been doing it for some time. 
Will you pull the window down ? It's right by your bed, and I'd have to 
get up. Pull the shade down, too, so I can turn on the light." 

"I haven't heard a sign of a rising bell or any racket in the hall, but 
I most know it's time to get up. Let's see what time it is. 

"Mercy, Percy ! Get up and put on your clothes in one hurry ! Xo 
wonder I've not heard any racket. They've been at breakfast nearly 
ten minutes and — 

"Just my luck ! My slippers are not here and I'll never get my shoes 
buttoned. Thank heaven for skirts long enough to hide half the but- 
tons ! 

"Your hair already brushed ? How'n grace did you ever get ahead of 
me ? Here goes mine with a lick and a promise, truly — 

"Oh, I'll never get my dress and collar on straight ! Whose long 
coat ? I bid for it — 'seen it first !' Could you tell I wasn't buttoned 
and that I had on a bow for a collar ? 

"Can't you see the L. P. looking at us ? Her eyes more'n 'have all the 
seeming of a demon's that is dreaming,' any way." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = a = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = s = = = Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, In 

the Interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1910-1911. 

Nell Battle Lewis, Editor-in-Chief. 

Bessie Smedes Erwin, Caroline Clarke Jones, Janie Ruffin Sims, 

Elizabeth Byrd Henderson, Josephine Tonnoffski, 

Elizabeth Hughes, Isabelle Hester Perry, Rebecca Bennehan Wood. 

Ruth Reynolds Critz. 

Elizabeth Woodard Leary, Business Manager. 

Amelia Pinckney Sturgeon, Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

EDITORIAL. 



Get the Habit. 

Now that exams, are over, we all heave a sigh of relief, and relax and 
relapse ; relax from the tension of the strain of mental exertion of a 
kind to which we are entirely unaccustomed ; and relapse into our former 
careless habits in regard to the preparation of our lessons. We have all 
experienced to a greater or less degree the discomforts of cramming, and 
we are heartily glad that for a time it is over with. Some of us may 
claim that cramming has certain advantages, but those advantages are 
very slight. Assuming that we come to school for the purpose of acquir- 
ing knowledge (which is certainly a reasonable assumption), then cram- 
ming has no value. For very little knowledge was ever acquired through 
such a means. And now is the time to begin, if we would save ourselves 
the necessity of cramming on finals, for regular daily preparation will 
render it unnecessary at the end of the year. It is the plodder who 
"gets there" every time. At the final lap of the race the sudden burst 
of speed on the part of the hare may be interesting, but if you care 
to notice it is the tortoise that usually wins. And now, at the begin- 
ning of a new term is an excellent time to cultivate the habit of sys- 
tematic study. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 183 

Read! Marl^ ! Act! 

It seems absurd to plead so continuously, but The Muse is your maga- 
zine, girls, and it's up to you to support it. And where it needs the 
greatest support is in regard to original stories and sketches. There will 
be two perfectly good Annuals waiting for the two people who do most 
for the Monthly. Girls, you can help so much, if you only will ! 



"The King's Gifts " 

There are several of us at school now who knew and liked Frances 
Loomis, who was here in 1908. It is with great pride and pleasure that 
we publish as the opening poem in this issue of The Muse her excellent 
production, "The King's Gifts." 



The Rector's Christmas Greeting and a Reply 



The Rector expressed his Christmas greeting to many of his friends in the verses printed below. 
One of the replies was in verse, and it breathed so well the vacation spirit of ease that, with the 
consent of the author, Mr. James Knox of St. Paul's School, it is also published here. 



I. The Greeting. 

Many times through the year do I think of each friend, 
And lament that on physical laws I depend; 
Though my heart is not fixed in one spot or one clime, 
My body must stay in one place at a time. 

While to look on each face and to hear the kind word, 
To clasp each by the hand and by each to be heard 
Is denied me: yet still can my thoughts travel wide, 
Be with you and with all at this glad Christmastide. 

So, while writing your name, I am with you in heart 
With a message of friendship I wish to impart. 
May no distance or time ever make us less near; 
Merry Christmas to you, and to those you hold dear. 

2 The Reply. 

As I lie in my bed, this post-festival morn, 
And ponder my life since the day I was born, 
The butler has brought me, with oatmeal and shoes, 
The late-ripened product of your tardy muse. 



184 The St. Maky's Muse. 

It is clear that warm words and warm hearts of the South 
Have but mellowed the words that proceed from your mouth. 
Alas! that the cold limitations of space 
Deny me the pleasure of seeing your face. 

But love is not cabined by physical laws — 
Ah, no! my dear friend, it goes on without pause. 
At this moment my thoughts are in close tete-a-tete 
With you and your wife and your sweet little "Eight." 



The Rector in the Health Movement. 

In addition to the interest which all enlightened people must feel in 
these days in the struggle for better sanitary conditions, a campaign 
which has become almost nation wide, the members of St. Mary's feel a 
deeper interest on account of the active part the Rector of St. Mary's 
has taken in the local campaign for better health, in assisting the 
State Board of Health, which, under the aggressive and able leader- 
ship of its Secretary, Dr. W. S. Rankin, is doing so much for the 
promotion of better health conditions in the State. Mr. Lay is one 
of the board of contributing editors of the Bulletin of the North 
Carolina Board of Health, in which he has had several valuable articles. 
In the present winter he and Dr. Rankin have been largely instrumental 
in the formation of the Raleigh Health League, which is proving a valu- 
able factor in improving the city, and he is the present head of the 
League, being Chairman of the Executive Council. 

We believe that readers of The Muse will be glad to have republished 
here two interesting productions of Mr. Lay, the first a "health hymn," 
written for use at the Raleigh Anti-Tuberculosis meeting last spring, the 
second, one of the newspaper articles published in connection with the 
publicity work of the Raleigh Health League. E. C. 

Health Hyrrjn. 

O God, Who into cold dead clay 

Didst breathe the vital breath, 
Help us to keep this gift divine, 

To live and conquer death. 
Make strong our arms to do that work 

Each has on earth, we pray ; 
Though journeying towards eternity, 

Make all live well each day. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 185 



Christ, the Great Physician, come, 

And teach us by Thy grace 
To use the means that Thou dost bless 

To save the human race. 
As Thou didst heal the blind and deaf, 

The maimed, the halt, the lame, 
So teach us now to do Thy work, 

And labor in Thy name. 

Holy Ghost, Who givest life, 

Make clean our hearts from sin; 
As temples make our bodies fit 

For Thee to dwell within. 
Make strong the weak, increase the strong, 

Keep clean our outward part, 
That we may win Thy great reward, 

And see Thee, pure in heart. G. W. L. 



Gratitude for Things That Do Not happen. 

It is related that in a composition on pins a little boy wrote, "Pins have saved the 
lives of thousands of people." Some one asked how this was. The little boy replied, 
"By not swallowing them." 

Foolish as this may seem, on consideration there will be found a deep philosophic 
foundation in the wisdom of this little boy's remark. We ought to feel grateful for 
things that do not happen; but we seldom do feel grateful in such cases. When in 
health we do not feel grateful for that greatest of all blessings, since we do not think 
about it at all. It is only when sickness comes that we realize from the misery of 
our condition at that time, how very happy we were indeed before, and how grateful 
we ought to have been that we simply had not fallen sick. 

Suppose that a thousand people had to come up at a certain time and draw little 
slips of paper, and that on some of these slips it said, "You have to die of tubercu- 
losis," on others, "You will have to have typhoid fever and be sick a long time and 
be very miserable, and cause your friends a great deal of trouble and expense," while 
some said "You have to die of typhoid fever." Suppose others said, "You will have 
to lead a comparatively useless life from the attacks of malaria, or other diseases." 
If every one had to come up and draw one of these slips there would be great excite- 
ment previous to the drawing, and when anybody drew a blank slip, showing that he 
was to be blessed with perfect health, he would feel exceedingly happy and exceed- 
ingly grateful. We are drawing these slips all the time, without knowing it, and it 
is only when we draw a slip that puts us into our beds and inflicts upon us a great 
pain and suffering that we realize that we have drawn any slip at all. This is why 
people are so careless about matters of health. Nobody ever thinks that he is going 
to be the one to draw the fatal slip. "In time of peace prepare for war." Just 



186 The St. Mary's Muse. 

because we are in excellent health we should feel most grateful for it, and should 
show our gratitude by working to keep ourselves and others in health. 

Let us imagine that in the above supposed case it was possible for people by 
banding together and helping each other to take out a certain number of the fatal 
slips that had tuberculosis, typhoid, etc., on them and substitute for them blank 
slips which would show that those particular people would enjoy perfect health. 
Would we not use every effort in the world to take out as many of the fatal slips as 
possible and substitute for them the white slips that would give the blessing of 
health? This power is actually in our hands, and we do not realize it, or use it as 
we should, because we do not see the slips with our eyes. 

If we should all join together many diseases can be practically prevented, and the 
blessing of health and of life given to many who otherwise are condemned to illness 
with its attendant pain, discomfort and expense, or even to death itself. Let us be 
thankful for the blessings given us by means of the pins we do not swallow. 

G. W. L. 



Timely Topics. 



Sing a Song of Musing. 

Sing a song of "Musing," 
Of pleasure, careless ease. 

See the happy Muse Board, 
Doing what they please. 

The "Boss" is up in East Rock, 
Spooning with "Louise," 

A. Sturgeon's listening, breathless, 
To "E. C.'s" philosophies. 

Dear Byrd, the "glass of fashion," 
Is sporting down the street, 

And "Perry I.'s" preparing 
A program for the meet. 

C. Jones for "her Amelia" 
Is waiting on the steps; 

The "patron saint," E. Leary, 
Is busy nursing Preps. 

B. Erwin's hunting "Birdie," 
To tell her troubles to, 

And Janie Sims is sleeping, 
(She's nothing else to do.) 



The St. Mary's Muse. 187 



Tonnoffski's busy studying 

Distinctions great to win; 
The "practical" Rebecca 

Is calling on her kin. 

R. Critz, the prize debater, 

Is airing of her views, 
But Hughes, the ever-faithful, 

Is busy getting news. 

So sing a song of "Musing" — 

Who'll undertake to guess 
When, with such great industry, 

The Muse will get to press? 

— Xell Battle Lewis. 



A Rhyme of Examinations. 

The next day exams, would begin. 
Said Xell: "I do not care a pin 

For vocal, you know, 

But for English — oh ho! 
The way I must cram is a sin." 

Amelia approved with delight, 

She, also, must work with her might. 

"But what shall we take 

To keep us awake? 
"Mister Crook, we must seek in our plight." 

He said he would go to the store, 
Get two Coca-colas or more; 

Miss Sutton — well, she 

Looked on in high glee, 
While the girls for the dollar just tore. 

Nine-'leven was the time they must stop 
Their work, in the office to pop; 

But, sad to relate, 

They were two minutes late, 
And of drinks there was left not a drop. 

To their room to shut up every crack 
The girls then they hastened them back, 

Placed the screen on the floor, 

In front of the door — 
"Coca-cola is all now we lack!" 

Prepared to cram English all night — 
A tap at the door — what a sight! 

Miss Battle said "No, 

I will not have it so; 
Undress, now, and put out your light." — L. H. 






ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

tt„„„», „„ ir,„„ d.,™.,,^,™ i Mrs. Kate de Ft. Meares, Wilmington. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - j Mrs T McK p itt enger. Raleigh 

President .... Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 

Secretary .... Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - . - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 

Field Secretary ... Mi3s Mary F. Henderson .Salisbury. 

Alumnae Day, 

The alumnae will remember that May 12th is celebrated as Alumnae 
Day that being the date of the first opening of the School. May 12, 
1911, will be the 69th anniversary of the opening. The day falls on 
Saturday. 

Alumnae Day is the time appointed for regular meetings of the organ- 
ized alumnae, and the idea is that at this spring meeting the gathering 
should if possible take the form of a simple luncheon, with the business 
and speech-making following the luncheon. 

The attention of the alumnae is called to the importance of these 
meetings in hope that as many as possible will be arranged for. 

Material is now being gathered and put into shape for the Alumnae 
Day Muse, which will be issued early in April. 

Aluronae Motes. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Hunt, of Norfolk, are rejoicing in a first-born 
daughter, born January 9th. Mrs. Hunt is remembered by St. Mary's 
folks as Laura Gwyn (02-03), of Asheville. 

Among the welcome visitors of the month has been Mrs. C. L. Prid- 
gin (Ila Eountree, '10), who spent a few days in Raleigh with her hus- 
band, who was here on Masonic and other business. She expressed her- 
self as much pleased with her new home at Marion, 1ST. C, where Dr. 
Pridgin is at present located in connection with his duties on the staff 
of the Hookworm Commission. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 189 

The death of Mrs. H. M. Anderson, which occurred at the Rectory in 
Morganton, the home of her daughter, Mrs. McXeely DuBose, early 
this month, brings a feeling of loss to many St. Mary's friends. Dur- 
ing the rectorship of Mr. DuBose, Dr. and Mrs. Anderson made their 
home with the DuBoses at St. Mary's, where they were known by all 
St. Mary's girls of those years, who saw in their courtly manners and 
gentle kindness representatives of the finest type of the Southern gentry. 
Dr. Anderson died at the Rectory the year before Mr. DuBose left St. 
Mary's, but Mrs. Anderson moved with the family to Morganton, where 
she has lived since. 

Though Senator A. H. Boyden, of Salisbury, who was present with 
General Carr for luncheon and the Lee's Birthday exercises, and who 
followed General Carr in a few words to the School in the parlor, has 
not been a frequent visitor at St. Mary's in recent years, yet he feels 
warmly attached to St. Mary's through his wife, who was Miss May 
Shober, and whom he used to come to see during her school days here. 
Mrs. Boyden's mother, Mrs. May Wheat Shober, contributed, as Muse 
readers will remember, some very interesting reminiscences to the last 
alumnae number of The Muse. Her home is now in Brooklyn. 

His many friends and all connected with St. Mary's have regretted 
very much to hear of the resignation by Rev. McISTeely DuBose of his 
work in Morganton on account of his continued ill-health. Xone who 
knew him at St. Mary's need to be told of the unceasing energy, often 
far too much for his strength, that Mr. DuBose always unselfishly puts 
into his work, with a consequent drain on his health. His brother, Dr. 
T. M. DuBose, of Columbia, S. C, with whom he has been for some 
time this winter, deems it advisable that he should take a complete rest 
for a season, a course which we hope will result in a steady and complete 
recovery. 

It is unofficially announced that the memorial window to Sara Ger- 
trude Sullivan, '08, of Savannah, whose death occurred in August, 1908, 
will be placed in the Chapel by Easter. The window is the gift of close 
school friends and her classmate, Miss Rena Hoyt Clark of Tarboro 
has been in charge of the movement. This will be the sixth memorial 
window in the Chapel and the first to the memory of one of the younger 
alumnae. 



190 The St. Mary's Muse. 

There have been a number of welcome alumnae visitors as guests of 
the School since the holidays. "Susan Bynum" (04-05), of Lincoln- 
ton, spent several days with "Miss Katie" in January, and "Marguerite 
LeCron," '08, and "Marguerite Thompson," '08, of Baltimore, were 
with her early in February ; "May Shuford," '10, of Hickory, stopped 
for a very brief stay on her way back from a very pleasant Christmas 
visit to her Edenton friends, the Rogersons and Annie Wood, and "Sallie 
Haywood Battle," '09 — "Miss Battle" we should call her since her 
year on the "Facultee" — of Rocky Mount, was in town for the first time 
since she said farewell to her duties last May; "Eugie Woodruff," of 
Wilmington, and "Mariel Gary," of Henderson, have also paid welcome 
visits. 

The Muse has been pleased recently with letters from "May Hoke," 
who is enjoying the experiences of life in the apple belt of Oregon; 
"Frances Bottum," who despite her enjoyment of southern California 
is looking forward with eager anticipation to "coming home" east this 
summer permanently (Her sister, Margaret, hopes to be a St. Mary's 
girl in September) ; Miss Jessie Degen ('94), in Portland, Maine, where 
she remains ever faithful to her Alma Mater ; and "Florence Beckwith" 
('07-08), from her home in Jacksonville, Fla. Having thus reached 
"the four corners of the land," it needs only to hear from "the Jeud- 
wines" in England, Mrs. Robb White (Placide Bridgers) in the Philip- 
pines, Miss Susan Marshall ('98), who is spending a year with her 
brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Cameron, in Hong 
Kong, and Misses Elizabeth and Annie Cheshire in their Chinese mis- 
sion points — all of them constant friends of St. Mary's and The Muse — 
to truly "circle the globe." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 191 

Alumnae Weddings. 

Dennis-Hampton. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Wade Hampton 

have the honor of announcing the 

marriage of their daughter 

Minna 

to 

Mr. Charles DeWitt Dennis 

on Wednesday, the fourth of January 

One thousand, nine hundred and eleven 

at Gainesville, Florida. 

"Minna Hampton" has been heard little of at St. Mary's since she 
left School in 1905, and was followed by her sister, Miss Catherine, a 
year later, but both sisters have many friends among the girls of their 
years here to whom the notice of Miss Minna's wedding will be of much 
interest. 



Clonts-Williams. 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Dawson Burwell 

invite you to be present 

at the Church of the Holy Innocents, 

Henderson, ISTorth Carolina, 

on Wednesday, January the fifth 

nineteen hundred and eleven 

at four o'clock 

to witness the marriage of their niece 

Einora Spottswood Williams 

and 
Mr. Henry Koopman Clonts. 

"Einora Williams" ('03-04) has shown her continued interest in her 
Alma Mater by more or less brief visits to St. Mary's from time to time, 
and from her residence in Oxford, Durham and Henderson is known 
to many St. Mary's girls. The Muse extends hearty congratulations to 
Mr. and Mrs. Clonts and best wishes for a very happy life. 



192 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Davenport-Savage. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Lawrence Savage 
announce the marriage of their daughter 

Lily 

to 

Mr. J. Paul Davenport 

on Wednesday, the eighteenth of January 

nineteen hundred and eleven 

Speed, North Carolina. 

"Lily Savage" was a St. Mary's girl in '03-04, and later spent a 
winter in Raleigh when she added to the number of her friends. As 
Mrs. Davenport she has the best wishes of many St. Mary's friends. 



Neeser-Beebe. 



Mr. and Mrs. Beverly DeElwin Beebe 

request the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Minnie Moore 

to 

Mr. Rudolph Neeser 

on Tuesday the second of February 

at twelve o'clock 

Londonderry 

Easton, Maryland. 

Though "Minnie Beebe" has not revisited St. Mary's since her school- 
days here in 1903-04, she was too prominent a figure in those years to 
be forgotten, and many friends from St. Mary's as elsewhere will wish 
her happiness in her wedded life. Three St. Mary's girls were mem- 
bers of her bridal party — her sister, Miss Heloise, who was maid of 
honor, and Misses Mary Stuart and Sarah Phifer Jones of Charlotte, 
her schoolmates here. For the past few years the Beebes have lived a 
large part of their time at their country home, "Londonderry," Easton, 
Md., where the wedding took place. Mr. ISTeeser is a New Yorker, and 



The St. Mary's Muse. 193 

after the honeymoon spent in Southern France the bride and groom will 
make their home in Convent, 1ST. J. The Muse extends hearty con- 
gratulations. 

Why the Rose is Red ? 



(The editors greatly appreciate this contribution from Miss Williams, an alumna of the earlier 
days. Readers of The Muse will remember her "Graveyard Rabbit," published several years ago. 



BY SARAH STONE WILLIAMS. 

'Tis said that in Eden, as passing along, 

'Mid the shimmer and sheen of odorous bowers, 
In silvery trebles a fragment of song 

Just parting her lips as she sang to the flowers, 
Fair Eve paused a moment. Her eye of soft blue, 

As pure in its depths as the heaven above, 
Caught the gleam of a rose, a-sparkle with dew, 

As it breathed its fragrant petition for love. 

One instant she bent o'er its perfumed snow. 

"Shall I pluck thee," she cried, "to twine in my hair? 
Nay, bloom on — 'tis a gift from the angels, I know; 

By this kiss I accept the love-token so rare." 
Then the rose, blushing red with pride and delight, 

Enthused from center to velvety tips, 
Ever since has retained the color so bright 

That it caught at the touch of her velvety lip9. 



READ !— MARK 1— ACT I 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 



JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



1 It's worth the difference" 



WHARTON & TYREE 



Workers in Artistic Photography" 



The Senior Class offers 

THE 1911 ANNUAL MUSE 

$2.00 to Muse subscribers 
$2.50 to others. 

On sale March 1st. Send in your order NOW. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 
MILLINERY 



Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILL.E AND SALISBURY ST8. 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



Advertisements. 



Herbert Rosenthal 

LADIES' FINE SHOES 



INSURE IN THE 

Jefferson Standard Life Ins. Go. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Strongest in the South 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUIXN & CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS. 
COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 



131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 



COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 



5 West Hargett St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY 

CANDY — CHINA — TOYS 

PICTURES STATIONERY 



Great Scott. 

If Ivanhoed the bonny brae, 

And Athelstaned his tunic new, 
If Friar Tucked the food away, 

Pray what, oh what, did Eoderick Dhu? 

— Exchange. 



NORFOLK 

OYSTE RS 

DAILY 

Wade's Fish Market 

113 E. Martin St. Both Phones 356 


J. SCHWARTZ 

RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 


ROBERT SIMPSON 

DRUGGIST AND PRESCRIPTIONIST 


H. T. HICKS & COMPANY 

For Toilet Requisites and 
Colds Drinks 




BRETSCH'S BAKERY 


ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 


EAT 
BETTS' ICE CREAM 


RALEIOH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the onlv perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



POOL & CROCKER 

up-to-date 
FOOTWEAR 

Special Attention to Fit 

105 Fayette ville St. 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 



AND SODA FOUNTAIN 



Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 

President. Treasurer. 

G. H. DORTCH, R. S. BUSBEE, 

Secretary. General Manager. 



You can always tell a Senior, 

For he's so sedately gowned. 
You can always tell a Junior 

From the way he sports around. 
You can always tell a Freshie 

From his timid looks and such. 
You can always tell a Sophomore, 

But you can not tell him much.— 



■Ex. 



Dr. L. J. PEGRAM 

DENTIST 
Office 209% Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. C. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
College Postals 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 



M. ROSENTHAL 

HO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON <fc HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING NOTHING 
EXCEEDS THE 

GAS RANGE 

Always Ready. No Dirt. No Ashes 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the Welsbach, "The Light that Does 
Not Flicker." 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



DARNELL &, THOMAS 
Music House 

Established 1887 

Pianos, Organs, Small Instruments, Sheet 
Music and Instruction Books 

Raleigh, - - North Carolina 

MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 

OF RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital 5100,000.00 4 per cent paid in Savings 

Department 
E. C. Duncan, Pres. W. B. Drake, Jr., Cash. 

A. H. FETTING 

Manufacturer of Greek Letter Fraternity 

Jewelry, 213 N. Liberty St., Baltimore, Md. 

Factory: 213 Little Sharp St. 

43* Memorandum package sent to any fraternity 
member through the Secretary of Chapter. Special 
designs and estimates furnished on class pina, rings, 
medals for athletic meets, etc. 



(^BROUGHTO 
[f/PPIArrLNG " 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 
and Power 

f 174 
Both Phones:^ 2 9« 



The Yarborough House 

invites your patronage 



Mr. Lay (in Ethics) : "Miss Perry, how many ends has a stick ?" 
Perry, I. (glibly) : "Two, unless it is a forked one." 



K I N,G » S GROCERY, 

"The Little Store." 



E. M. UZZELL & CO. 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

only high grade work 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

INSURANCE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE 
Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 
THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 



SEND TO 

Plummer's Stables 

For Riding and Driving Horses 

YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. PULLEN. 
Pres., Chas. Root, Cashier. Capital and Surplus 
375,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 



Advertisements. 



Chas. E. Johnson 



F. H. Briggs 



PRESIDENT CASHIER 

THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST GO. 

"round steps bank" since 1865 

WE APPRECIATE OLD FRIENDS 

AND 

WELCOME THE NEW 
4% Time Certificates of Deposit Call at the Bank 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C- 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE~ 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 



DR. F. D. CASTLEBURY 

DENTIST 



AYCOCK & WINSTON 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW RALEIGH, N. C. 



JOHN C. DREWRY 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 



Dr. V. E. TURNER 

DENTIST 



GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 



Dr. D. E. EVERETT 

DENTIST 



MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 



HUNTER BROS., & BREWER COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



J. R. FERRALL & COMPANY— GROCERIES 

BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 

222 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



It will well pay you to buy your Ready-to-Wear 

Garments at our store because we sell 

better goods for less money 

THE FASHION 203-205 Fayetteville St. 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

109 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 



Why is Brantley's Fountain the Most Popular ? 
ASK THE GIRLS 



ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 




St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 

Raleigh, N C. 



WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

i 

ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and^ 
safely Headache in all its forms. 

C. E. HARTGE— ARCHITECT 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

MRS. FRANK REDFORD— MILLINERY 

13 West Hargett St. Phone 632 

10% off to Faculty and Boarding Pupils 

SHOES 

12 East Martin Street 

PEEBLES & EDWARDS 

DR. ERNEST H. BROUGHTON 

DENTIST 

116 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

DR. E. B. HOWLE 



BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

Books and Stationery 

113 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 

GREEN & WATSON 

Art Store 

11 West Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 

WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 

Phone 953-R 

217M Fayetteville Street 

N. H. MOORE 

Repairer of Fine Shoes 

Fayetteville Street 



MISS SMITH 

DRESSMAKER 

Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 
Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware 
Repairing promptly done 



Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located at 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th St?., Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 



"YOURS FOR HEALTH" 

WEST DISINFECTING COMPANY 

S. S. SELIG, Jr., General Sales Agent. ATLANTA, GA. 

LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF DISINFECTANTS IN THE WORLD 
\ 

School Calendar. 
February, 1911. 

February 2d, Thursday. 8 : 30 p. m. Concert and Reception complimentary to 
the Legislature and State Officers. 

February 4th, Saturday. 8:00 p. m. Stereopticon Lecture on "Panama." Supt. 
F. M. Harper of the Raleigh City Schools. 

February 18th, Saturday. 8:00 p. m. Lecture: "Where the Master Trod." Rev. 
Dr. Elmer U. Hoenshel. 

February 25th, Saturday. 8:15 p. m. Muse Club Play: "A Fighting Chance." 

February 27th, Monday. 8:30 p. m. Concert: Mr. David Bispham, Baritone. 
(Peace-St. Mary's Concert Series.) 

March 1st, Ash Wednesday. Holy day. Lent begins. 



NORFOLK -SO UTH ERN RAILWAY 

New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

Express train service between Raleigh, Wilson, Greenville, Goldsboro, Kinston, 

New Bern, Morehead City, Washington, Plymouth, Elizabeth City, 

Virginia Beach and Norfolk, Virginia. 



VIA NORFOLK TO NORTH AND EAST 
VIA RALEIGH TO SOUTH AND WEST 



Location Central for the Carolina^. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(for girls and young women). 



69th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 15, 1910. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 26, 1911. 



St. Mary's 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 
S. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



offers instruction in these 

Departments: £. THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1910-11 are enrolled 225 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty -eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment} New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector. 



St- Albany's Abuse 




flDarcb— Bprtl', 19U 



"Raleigh, ft <L. 




Rev. McNeely DuBose, 

Fourth Rector of St. Mary's School, 
December 31, 1859-April 15, 1911. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

LENT NUMBER. 

March-April, 1911. No. 7. 

(The Lenten Season seems to call especially to our minds the value of the religious 
training at St. Mary's. This thought is emphasized by the verses and the revery 
printed below. 

The verses were written by Anne Archbell, of Kinston, when a student here in 
1904-05, and were published in The Muse at that time. Miss Archbell died in 1909. 

The revery was written this Lent by a St. Mary's girl of 1899-1900, and will be 
appreciated by many of her sisters of the alumnae and present-day girls.) 



Sunset. 



ANNE ARCHBELL. 



glorious hour of sunset, 
You'll come to me again, 

When years have written on my brow 
Their tale of joy and pain. 

And I'll see dear old St. Mary's, 
And the Chapel in the light, 

As the golden glory floods the sky, 
And the sun sinks out of sight. 

The girls pour from the doorways 

In one continuous stream; 
Gay as the bridge to Asgard, 

They come into my dream ; 
And like the pious Arab 

When called to prayer at night, 

1 join the throng at Chapel 

As the sun sinks out of sight. 

The organ's solemn pealing 

"Dear Lord, abide with me, 
For fast doth fall the eventide," 

Will oft appeal to me. 
While visions of St. Mary's 

Will come to me at night, 
And I'll see the little Chapel 

As the sun sinks out of sight. 



196 The St. Mary's Muse. 

And when life's day is ended, 

And the lessons all are done, 
May I feel the benediction 

That comes with the setting sun, 
When called to prayer at the Chapel. 

And may my faith grow bright 
As I offer my last evening prayer 

As the sun sinks out of sight. 



The Chapel. 



The last Amen has sounded and out into the sunset come the girls in 
groups of two and threes. Reluctant just now to join in their merry 
chatter, and feeling a strange unaccountable longing to be alone, I step 
back into the shadow of the Chapel and watch the laughing couples go 
arm in arm down the broad walk. 

With the music of the evening hymn still in my mind, I turn and 
softly open the Chapel door and go in. How quiet and how still it is 
here. What long purple shadows the setting sun has cast across the 
floor. The chancel is bathed in a soft violet light tinged with gold. 

The sound of the girls' voices through the open window seem far 
away and hushed. So peaceful and so still is this little house of God. 

Stealing into one of the pews I sit close against the wall drinking 
in the quiet beauty of it all. How long I sit there I do not know; I 
seem to lose all thought of time and the moments slip away. 

Suddenly I am roused by the sound of the organ. Softly and 
wondrously the notes sound as though an unseen hand played upon the 
heart strings of memory itself. Then two by two through the open door 
shadowy forms begin to file slowly in. 

Girls with laughing faces, and girls demurely grave. Girls, girls, 
girls, everywhere until they fill the Chapel seat on seat. How queerly 
they are dressed, what strange little bonnets, and stiff full frocks. As 
they file into the pew in front of me I hear one whisper "Tonight, 
directly after lights are out — don't forget." And I smile in sympathy. 

The music rises in volume until it fills the little Chapel and mingles 
sweetly with the girlish voices rising full and clear. Then all too soon 
the last Amen is sounded and once again the long procession marches 
slowly down the aisle. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 197 

"Who — who are you V I breathe in wonder as they pass and the 
answer comes whispered back to me through the stillness "We are the 
girls of '62." 

Gone ! and yet a new procession comes filing, filing through the open 
door. Girls, girls, girls, a long, long chain as the classes of the years 
come swiftly on. 

And through the shadows names are softly whispered, and of Lucy 
and of Mary, and of Margaret, I hear; and then again of Lucile and of 
Minna and of Caroline and Nell. 

I look and in the chancel where the dying day casts hues of violet and 
of purple and of gold, faces that once knew and blessed this chancel with 
their presence smile down upon the children they have loved. 

An endless chain ! The children's children come in and out again 
through the open door. White robed girlish figures, Commencement 
Days of years and years go by. What sweet, fresh, untried faces ! What 
girlhood dreams go out to meet and mingle with the noise and discord 
of the world. Yet hearing always amid the tumult the Chapel music 
rising sweet and clear. 

Of all that countless long procession passing slowly out into the night, 
I feel I know there is none there who does not return in spirit and in 
memory to the little Chapel and gain afresh an inspiration there. 

The mantle of the night has fallen, and I, too, turn toward the open 
door, but pause upon the threshold reluctant to depart. 

All is darkness save the chancel which slows with a mellow light, a 
peace divine. The soft hushed notes of the organ sound a benediction to 
the Chapel, and to the girls who have and who will for ages worship 
here. 

"May the blessings of God Almighty" — the sweet hushed notes are 
saving — "Be amongst you and remain with you alwavs Saint Mary's 
Chapel." Ax Old Girl. ('99). 



198 The St. Mary's Muse. 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT. 



Glastonbury Abbey. 



LAURA MARGARET HOPPE. 



It was on one of the rare sunshiny days of an English summer that 
we made our trip to Glastonbury. This, the oldest Christian Church in 
Britain, is situated in Southern Somerset on what was once the Island 
of Avalon. 

Glastonbury is off the beaten track of the ordinary tourist and at this 
rather secluded spot are not encountered the crowds that one meets at 
Stratford, Oxford and other well-known places. The ruin of the Abbey 
has a three-fold interest to the visitor, for here, tradition says, Joseph 
of Arimathea made his last home and is buried in a chapel called after 
his name. Here also the earliest order of monks was founded, and 
here also King Arthur and Queen Guinevere, famed in song and story, 
are said to be buried underneath the great tower. 

The Abbey, itself, is now only a ruin but one can still see the remains 
of exquisitely chiseled stone pillars, the lace tracery of the chapels and 
shrines and the general style of the body of the church. It is impossible 
to step within these ancient ruins without submitting to the spell they 
weave, for the instant we stand in the shadow of those mighty walls, 
all the inheritance of a thousand years comes back to us and we get to 
the heart of things, come close in touch with the early life of our race 
and church. 

Long before arriving and from whatever point one may approach, 
"Glastonbury Tor" may be seen. It is a steep hill, like a volcanic cone, 
and is crowned with a lonely tower. Here it is said Joseph of Arimathea 
and his followers stopped to rest and Joseph, thrusting his staff into 
the ground, left it there as he had need of it no more. The staff sprang 
into a tree and one may still see a lone skeleton of a once handsome tree 
standing there. 

Another story is told of how the Holy Grail was buried on this same 
hill and immediately a beautiful little spring bubbled up into the crypt 
of the Abbey. This Water was considered holy by the monks and was 



The St. Mary's Muse. 199 

used only for baptismal purposes. A dry spring bed may still be seen 
if one will take the trouble to descend a crooked stairway into the crpyt. 

A little aside from the Abbey stands the quaint little, so-called 
"Abbot's Kitchen." It is octagon shaped, being made entirely of stone. 
Inside are four enormous fireplaces, large enough to roast the body of 
an ox, and to this place the good old monks used to retire and enjoy 
the bounty of the land. 

So complete has been the destruction of this that was once the 
proudest church in all England, there is little to say of the general 
architecture of the building. To those who have ever set foot on the 
magical Island of xVvalon, the name means immeasurable things, and 
to its few and desecrated ruins one turns first among all the Abbeys of 
England. Glastonbury has lately been bought by the Church of Eng- 
land to be preserved and taken care of. It should be guarded like a 
sanctuary and none should enter except in reverence, for it must be 
remembered that not only was it the first Christian church in Britain, 
but it has been hallowed by the feet of the highest and holiest bishops, 
priests and kings. 



To the Sphinx. 



N. A. R. 



Thou tranquil monument that knows no fear 

Of changing Tide or cruel Time's decay, 
Thou silent sentinel that sees the rise 

Of empires vast, and sees them fall away; 
Thou who hast seen the troops of former kings 

Clashing resplendent 'cross the wind-swept sands. 
And with the gaze, unchanged, inscrutable, 

Beheld the flight of Israel's captive bands; 
Thou whom the petty strife of men ne'er moves, 

Nor the wild ravage of the ages scars, 
There, in the shadow of the Pyramids, 

Calm and untiring as the quiet stars, 
There, though the winds across the plains may sweep. 

Hungry Decay in vain shall seek to mar; 
Forever shalt thou stand in majesty, 

Unmoved by glory and unawed by war. 



200 The St. Maby's Muse. 



Everyday Sketches. 



NO. II. 



Choir practice is over at last and the girls in pretty dresses troop 
into study hall for assembly. A few "harmonize" softly on the melody 
of the last hymn. After assembly, over in East Rock, and far out 
the door the line extends, waiting for mail. It is a jolly, good-natured 
line tonight. Some sing; others beat time on the backs of the unfor- 
tunates who happen to be in front of them ; others make would-be witty 
remarks about those who pass them, coming from the office. 

A girl with a worried look pushes through the crowd with a mur- 
mured "Beg pardon, but I must get to- -" 

But it's: 



"/ 



'Oh ! ISTo you don't ! We're on to your tricks and you don't pass 
us. 

"Well, it's past my understanding why you should object." 

The crowd emits a groan of anguish and the disturber of the peace 
subsides. 

From the parlor comes the sound of "rag-time." They are dancing 
over there. 

"Oh ! Pink ! give me the third ?" 

"Got it ! Sorry, but I can't help being popular. The fourth ?" 

"Good!" 

It is a very pretty sight. They all dance well. You notice one 
couple that dance especially so. Another couple are trying a new step 
with tolerable success, and considerable laughter. Over in one corner 
stands a bright-eyed girl who is evidently a favorite, for the "Preps" 
surrounding her are squabbling for dances with her. 

Somebody suggests a figure, and the crowd falls in with alacrity. 

By the door, the "Lady of the Night" bustles busily, searching for 
some lass for whom the inevitable Saturday night "suitor'' waits ; while 
the timid-looking suitor sits gingerly on a bench in the school-room and 
toys with his hat. 

In the school-room there is a busy murmur of conversation, broken 
sometimes by light laughter. There are a number of boys and girls in 



The St. Mary's Muse. 201 



the room, each couple seated at a separate desk and obviously oblivious 
of the presence of the others. But at the clang of the ''big bell" the 
"suitors 1 ' reluctantly depart. 
* * ***** 

Monday morning ! In the alcove by Miss Thomas' office door, the 
crowd of girls wait their turn, chattering in subdued voices. The floor 
is strewn with scraps of yellow permit blanks. Over in one corner 
some one is writing out a permission, using a friend's back as a prop. 
The office door opens, and a girl comes out, radiant, and dances down 
the hall ; then another emerges, and disappears with a tearful look. 

Out in front of Main Building the "Preps" are collecting, waiting 
for the chaperone to take them "down-town." 

In twos and threes other girls come ; leave their permissions with the 
"Lady of the Day" who sits sewing in a corner of the big, sunny porch, 
and with a swish of skirts, and clink of silver bags, hurry down-town 
to "Cally's" and ice cream. 

Scattered about the grove are other girls — some "uniting," some 
working busily over books or papers, others merely lounging idly, 
watching the departing crowds. 

A clatter of hoofs, and the horses for the Riding Club appear. Then 
girls come out of different buildings in varied riding attire, and the 
loungers in the grove settle themselves for another hour to watch the 
mounting. But at last they are off, and the solitary Senior on the steps 
of the Art Building turns again to her Current History; and the red- 
headed wood-pecker flies back to his drumming on a tree from which 
the horses in passing had frightened him. 



Two Points of View. 



LINA LOCKHART. 



Wearily I sank into one of the vacant seats of the homeward bound 
car. From the subdued murmur of conversation around me, it seemed 
that I heard a familiar voice. Suddenly I started forward as I recog- 
nized the dainty profile of the girl in front of me, who was leaning for- 



w 
en 



202 The St. Mary s Muse. 

ward talking to two girls in the seat ahead of her. She moved back 
quickly as a well-dressed man with the indescribable but unmistakable 
air of the "Man-About-Town" paused at her side. 

"And how is school ?" I heard him inquire. 

"Dull as ever," she answered, with a bright smile, as he sat down at 
her side. 

"I was just discussing the 'White Sister' which the school attended 
in a body Friday evening. Did you go ?" And, at his nod of assent, 
"Didn't you think it was heavenly ?" 

The Man-About-Town laughed indulgently. 

'The Company was splendid," he admitted. 

'Splendid!" cried the School Girl. "Why can't you say it more en- 
thusiastically? Don't you think the Sister was the most wonderful 
character ? Oh ! She loved the man so ! and then sacrificed her whole 
life and happiness for a principle.'' 

"Nonsense!" said the Man-About-Town, a little sharp note creeping 
into his indulgent tone. 

"How can you say that ? When she was so true to her idea of right 
though her lover was so desperate and in his despair, went to the last 
extremity to bring her to his viewpoint." 

"She did have a good deal of 'stick-it-outness' didn't she ?" said the 
Man-About-Town, "but I think the hero's last extremity was cowardly. 
A man can not be justified in going that far." 

"Wha-a-a-t," exclaimed the School Girl. "What do you mean ? He 
was so desperate — they were both in such horrible positions. Oh ! I 
sympathized with them both so ! I'm all mixed up, but any way I think 
the standpoint of both was perfectly reasonable. There!" 

"Truly you are mixed up," was the dry comment of her companion, 

"But you must agree with me on one thing — the Countess," returned 
the School Girl. "Wasn't she too horrid ?" 

"You must have been one of those who shed tears so copiously," 
smiled the Man-About-Town. 

"Oh ! No ! It was too wonderful for tears. I simply watched and 
listened with my whole being. I felt as if I were living out my own 
life, but every nerve was strained to understand everything without 



The St. Maky's Muse. 203 

time for anything else. Tears would have seemed commonplace beside 
such depth of feeling as was revealed to me." 

"St. Mary's" yelled the conductor. 

"Well, I'm glad you liked the play," said the Man-About-Town with 
a parting hand clasp. 

"It was perfect," the School Girl called over her shoulder to him, as 
she passed to the platform of the car. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



Rebecca Wood and Ruth Critz, Editors. 



February 4th — Stereopticon Lecture on " Panama." 

In the Auditorium, Saturday evening, February 4th, Superintendent 
F. M. Harper, of the City Schools of Raleigh, gave a very interesting 
and beneficial lecture on Panama. The stereopticon pictures showed 
very picturesque scenery and the work now being done on the Panama 
Canal, and these pictures Mr. Harper explained in his talk. 

February 13th — The Good Shepherd Concert. 
On Monday, February 13th, a concert was given in the Auditorium 
by the ladies of the Good Shepherd Church for the benefit of the build- 
ing fund of the church. St. Mary's was well represented on the program 
as Zona Shull sang a solo assisted by the choirs of Christ Church and 
the Church of the Good Shepherd, and Miss Wilson also sang a solo. 
St. Mary's should be proud of both of them. Those of us who went 
think they were the best on the program. Last, but not least, the St. 
Mary's orchestra played, and of course we enjoyed this, especially Mr. 
Owen's encore, the "Red Mill" music. The program was as follows : 

1. Wedding of the Winds — Concert Valse J. T. Hall 

ST. MARY'S ORCHESTRA. 

2. Recitative and Aria from Nedeshda Goring Thomas 

MISS F. ZTJLETTE WILSON. 

3. Inflamniatus et Aceensus — Solo with Chorus from Stabat Mater Rossini 

MISS ZONA SHULL. 
CHOIR OP CHRIST CHURCH. 
CHOIR OF CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD. 
2 



204 The St. Mary's Muse. 

4. Charity — Trio with Solo Rossini 

MISS LEONOMIE DUMAIS, 
MISS ZONA SHTJLL, MISS ELIZA KNOX. 

5. Violin Solo — Romance Evendsen 

MISS LOUISE PAULSEN. 

6. Aria from Carmen Bizet 

MISS LEONOMIE DUMAIS. 

7. Soldatenblut Von Blon 

ST. MARY'S ORCHESTRA. 

February 15th — The Rector's Address on "Personal Charm." 

At a joint meeting of the E A n and 2 A literary societies, Wednes- 
day night, February 15th, the Rector gave a talk on "The Respon- 
sibility of Personal Charm." He divided his topic into three parts, 
treating in the first of good carriage and a neat personal appearance, in 
the second of the cultivation of a low, soft voice, and in the third of 
spelling and handwriting. The address was most helpful and interest- 
ing and The Muse hopes to be able to print a copy of it in the next 
issue. 

February 25th — A F'9 n ting Chance. 

On February 25th the Muse Club presented the dramatic triumph of 
the season, "A Fighting Chance." A synopsis of this play was given 
in the February Muse. The cast all showed decided dramatic ability, 
and looked very pretty in the becoming dress of the early '60's. 

It would be difficult to point out any particular stars, because, as 
has before been mentioned, it was an "All Star" cast, as follows: 

Madame Mayburn Byrd Henderson 

The Principal of the School. 

Mile. Fordet Patsey Smith 

The French Instructress, possessing great admiration for her 
own detective powers. 

Eleanore Hamilton Nell Lewis 

The New Arrival. 

Cecil Hotspur Helen McArthur 

A True Southerner. 

Ruth Anna Morton Hortense Jones 

A Quakeress. 

Helen Hastings Lucy Harrison 

With an uncontrollable fondness for "jacks." 

Mabel Davis Tinsley Harrison 

An "F. F. V." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 205 

Lulu Jefferson Mary Louise Manning 

Cecil's Room-mate. 

Madeline Burgson Marie Thomas 

Troubled with English, but never with insomnia. 

Juliet Washington Anabel Johnson K. Parker 

Decidedly above "po' white trash." 

Rosy Harrigan Mary Owen 

With a love for the Union subservient to her hatred of "niggers." 

February 28th — Pcacc-St. Mary's Concert Series: Mr. David Bispham. 

The musical event of the year at St. Mary's was the appearance in 
the Auditorium on Monday, February 28th, of Mr. David Bispham. 
This was Mr. Bispham's third appearance in Raleigh under the auspices 
of St. Mary's, he having been brought here in 1905 by the Music De- 
partment under Mr. Sanborn and again in 1909 under Miss Dowd, 
and each time he has made the best of impressions. He has long been 
acclaimed America's leading baritone singer and we at St. Mary's can 
readily believe it. We quote from the News and Observer: 

Mr. David Bispham's recital at St. Mary's Auditorium last night was one of the 
most important musical events of the year. The program was varied and generous, 
the words were rendered with the spirit and the understanding, and the whole thing 
was given in English. There is nothing small about Mr. Bispham, and he treated 
the audience with his usual royal generosity. 

The first group of songs included "O Ruddier than the Cherry," from Handel's 
"Acis and Galatea" ; Tom Moore's "Believe Me, if All Those Endearing Young 
Charms," and a Jacobite song, "Down Among the Dead Men." For an antidote to 
the sentiment of the last — a very gay drinking song — Mr. Bispham gave the old 
English madrigal, "Drink to Me Only with Thine Eyes." 

The second group of songs included three ballads set to music by Carl Loewe: 
"Tom, the Rhymer," "Edward," and "The Wedding Song." These ballads, which 
displayed Mr. Bispham's dramatic power in both tragedy and comedy, were supple- 
mented by an extra number, Schubert's "Hark, Hark, the Lark." 

A third group of songs included four American compositions, Mrs. Freer's "Old 
Boatman," Hower's "Banjo Song," McCoy's "Song of the Flint," and Floridia's 
"Invocation to Youth." In addition to these, Mr. Bispham sang, following a request 
which the audience heartily endorsed, Damrosch's setting of "Danny Deever." 

For the conclusion, the program announced a reading of "The Raven" to a 
musical accompaniment. To keep from repeating too much from his last previous 
concert in Raleigh, Mr. Bispham changed this to a reading of Longfellow's "King 
Robert of Sicily." Afterwards, however, he gave "The Raven" in addition, a piece 
of generosity which saved many of his hearers from disappointment. The two read- 
ings, particularly that of "The Raven," were nothing less than wonderful. The effect 
on the audience was beyond description. 



206 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Much of the interest and value of the program was due to Mr. Bispham's condensed 
and happy introductions to the various songs. No little credit also is due to his 
accompanist, Mr. Harry M. Gilbert, an accomplished pianist, who knows what is due 
from him, and when and how much. 

The Peace-St. Mary's series has been a decided success and we hope 
that it may become a feature of future seasons. Before Mr. Bispham 
there had appeared Mrs. Rider-Kelsey, soprano, in December, and Mr. 
Oswald Bauer, pianist, in January. The fourth and concluding concert 
will be given in the Auditorium Monday, April 24th, by Paul Kefer, 
solo 'cellist of Damrosch's Orchestra. 

March lst-April 15th — The Lenten Season. 

Lent is always a period of comparative quiet at St. Mary's and this 
year has been no exception. The dancing in the evening suspended, no 
public recitals or concerts, no attendance at theater or ball game, the 
St. Mary's girl is almost forced to concentrate her attention on her 
studies and her Lenten observance — or on her spring wardrobe. 

The special Lenten services on Wednesday and Friday evenings have 
been well attended ; the Chapters have done some useful Lenten sewing, 
and the Literary Societies have presented some good programs, but no 
event of general interest was scheduled from Ash Wednesday until the 
annual visitation of Bishop Cheshire on Palm Sunday. 

The talks of the Rector on Wednesday afternoons in Lent have been 
on The Catholic Church, and on Fridays, on Habits, while at the daily 
services in Holy Week he treated each day of the events of the day. 



The Post-Easter Program. 



With Easter falling so late this year the period between the close of 
Lent and the end of the session is unusually short, which means that it 
will be crowded with "things to do." 

A partial list of the events scheduled will give some idea of how much 
thinking will be necessary to decide what can be seen or heard without 
too much damage to regular study. 

Monday, April 17 th (Easter Monday): Inter-collegiate Track-meet 
at A. & M. Carolina, Wake Forest, Trinity, Davidson and A. & M. 
expected to compete for the State championship. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 207 

Tuesday and Wednesday, April 18th and 19th: Annual Music 
Festival of the Raleigh Choral Society. Victor Herbert aud his full 
orchestra and seven prominent soloists with the Choral Society in three 
concerts, Tuesday night and Wednesday afternoon and night. 

Monday, April 21fth: Final Concert of the Peace-St. Mary's Con- 
cert Series. Paul Kefer, cellist. Mr. Kefer is a soloist in Danirosch's 
Orchestra. 

Wednesday, April 26th: Annual Inter-society Debate. Resolved: 
That the Modern Stage Has a Beneficial, Rather Than a Harmful, In- 
fluence. Epsilon Alpha Pi — Misses Patsey Smith and Elizabeth Leary 
— upholding the affirmative ; Sigma Lambda — Misses Ruth Critz and 
Tinsley Harrison — having the negative. 

Thursday, April 27th: Diploma Recital. Miss Ella Dorroh, pianist, 
assisted by the St. Mary's Orchestra. 

Saturday, April 29th: Annual appearance of the Dramatic Club 
under the direction of Miss Victor and Miss Urquhart in Wilde's com- 
edy, "The Importance of Being Earnest." 

Monday, May 1st: May Day Celebration under the direction of 
Miss Buxton. May Pole, Masques, etc. 

Thursday, May 4th : First public appearance of the St. Mary's 
Chorus, assisting Miss Mary Mitchell Chamberlain, pianist, in her Cer- 
tificate Recital. 

Saturday, May 6th: Lucy Bratton Chapter in the play: "When 
Patty Went to College." 

Friday, May 12th: Celebration of Alumnae Day, the 70th anni- 
versary of the opening of St. Mary's. 



School Gossip. 



Bessie Ebwin and Byrd Henderson. Editors. 



Among the alumnae visitors since the last issue of The Muse have 
been Misses Margaret LeCron, '08, and Marguerite Thompson, '08, of 
Baltimore, who were special guests of "Miss Katie" ; Alice Noble, '10, 
of Chapel Hill; Blair Rawlings ('09-10) of Wilson; Matilda Haugh- 



208 The St. Mary's Muse. 



ton ('06-08) of Washington, N. C, who was on her way to the Chapel 
Hill dances; Mary Wiggins ('08-09) of Suffolk, Va., who was visiting 
Helen McArthur; and Augusta Divine ('08-09) of Kocky Mount. 

"The Climax" and "The Paradise of Mahomet" were the two best 
attractions at the theater which it was possible to see before Lent, and 
they were attended by many. 

Mr. Lay acted as one of the judges of the Trinity-Swarthmore debate 
in Durham on March 4th, when Swarthmore triumphed ; and he at- 
tended the annual convention of the Association of the Presidents of 
Woman's Colleges of the Carolinas in Greenville, S. C, March 8-10. 
While at Greenville he was the guest of Rev. A. R. Mitchell, Mary 
Gibbes Mitchell's father. On his way back from Greenville, Mr. Lay 
stopped by President Pell's invitation at Spartanburg and made an 
address at Converse College on the night of Friday, March 10th. 

The Lenten service during the Rector's absence in South Carolina 
was taken on Wednesday, March 8th, by the Rev. Chas. N". Tyndell, 
of Fayette ville, who delivered a very effective address on "Genuineness." 
On Friday, March 10th, it was a great pleasure to have with us the 
Rev. Percy Eubanks, of Christ Church, Raleigh. 

The girls have been taking full advantage of the opportunity for 
week-end visits to their homes, which are open under the rules, and 
there are few of them within week-end distances who did not get in a 
visit. 

The basket-ball teams of A. & M. and Wake Forest played the first 
inter-collegiate game of basket-ball which has been played in Raleigh at 
Pullen Hall, at A. & M. in March. The following week, at the invita- 
tion of Mr. Lay, the A. & M. team came over to St. Mary's and played 
an exhibition game on our grounds to our great enjoyment. 

Among the parents who have recently visited the school are: Mrs. 
E. J. Lilly, of Fayetteville ; Mrs. W. J. Leary, of Edenton ; Major and 
Mrs. J. M. Williams, of Fort Screven, Ga. ; Mr. and Mrs. G. D. Pngh, 
of Savannah ; Mr. D. H. Jackson, of Petersburg, Va. ; Mrs. Frank 
Wood, of Edenton ; Mrs. W. C. Divine, of Rocky Mount ; Mr. W. W. 
Barber, of North Wilkerboro ; Mrs. E. S. Dorroh, of Greenville, S. C, 
and Mrs. A. McC. Parker, of Princeton, K J. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 209 

Amy Winston Entertains. 

On Monday, February 6th, Amy Winston was the hostess at a beau- 
tiful luncheon given at her home on Blount street. Mrs. Winston 
assisted in receiving the guests who assembled in the reception hall and 
parlor, from whence they adjourned to the dining room. Covers were 
laid for eighteen. The guests included Miss Buxton, Miss Booker of 
Peace Institute, Margaret Erwin, Elizabeth Dortch, Bessie Erwin, 
Jennie D. Harris, Elizabeth Morris, Helen Robinson, Julia Borden, 
Mary Louise Manning, Anne McKimmon, Elizabeth Thompson, Ruth 
Wells, Lucy Dortch, Tinsley Harrison, Amelia Sturgeon and Anne 
Field, and amid much merriment the girls found their places. 

The color scheme of green and white was carried out in every detail, 
from the white lace cover and mats over green to the candles and center- 
piece, which was a large bowl of white chrysanthemums and smilax. 
The shaded lights cast a glow over the whole and added to the beauty 
of the table. 

An elegant six-course luncheon was served, which was greatly en- 
joyed by the hungry schoolgirls. Toasts were drunk and healths pro- 
posed, and every one present had such a merry time that the inclemency 
of the weather was forgotten. 

After lunch, music in the parlor added to the pleasure of the guests 
and they relunctantly departed after a most enjoyable afternoon. 

A. B. F. 



Mrs. Andrews Entertains. 

On Monday, February 20th, Mrs. A. B. Andrews very delightfully 
entertained a number of St. Mary's girls at dinner. Mrs. Andrews was 
a most charming hostess, and her lovely home on Blount street will 
long be remembered as the scene of a very pleasant day. The guests 
were: Jennie D. Harris, Nellie Hendricks, Margaret Barber, Edith 
Bradshaw, Sophronia and Julia Cooper, Elise Smith, Nina Gibbs, 
Pleasant Stovall, Agnes Reese and Rebecca Wood. 



210 The St. Mary's Muse. 



D 



IN MEMORIAM 
Rev. McNeely DuBose, Fourth Rector of St. Mary's School 

December 31, 1859— April 15, 1911. 

Just as this number of The Muse is about to be printed and as Lent reaches its 
end, comes the distressing news from Morganton of the accidental death of Mr. 
DuBose. 

Just back from a winter spent with relatives and friends in South Carolina and 
Florida, a winter spent in recuperating from a breakdown due to too zealous devo- 
tion to the work of his ministry; restored to vigor of body and spirits and about to 
take up with the old interest his new work in Saluda; seemingly with years of great 
usefulness ahead of him as well as behind him; this sudden cutting off of his career 
in its prime (his passing) is one of God's mysteries which we must accept but may 
not fully understand. 

The dispatches tell us merely that Mr. DuBose was out duck-shooting, accom- 
panied by St. Pierre and St. John, his two young sons. He shot a duck which fell 
on the other side of the stream, attempted to cross the stream, which was swollen by 
the heavy rains, lost his balance and was swept away and drowned, and the body 
has not at this writing been recovered. 

Than Mr. DuBose St. Mary's had no better friend. For the four years of his 
Rectorship he gave himself with all his devoted zeal to the work of the School. 
When he resigned the Rectorship four years ago and resumed his priestly duties in 
the parish at Morganton and the work of the surrounding missions, his interest in 
St. Mary's was in no way diminished. As a Trustee he was enthusiastic in his 
advocacy of the improvements which have been made in the school plant, and he 
had been since its organization the Chairman of the Committee on Raising Funds for 
the School. 

A more extended account of Mr. DuBose will be published in a later Muse. This 
page will but attest the universal sorrow which all friends of St. Mary's will feel at 
his loss. 






The St. Mary f s Muse. 



Subscription, One Year. s = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = ■ = s a Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, In 
the Interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1910-1911. 

Nell Battle Lewis, Editor-in-Chief. 
Bessie Smedes Erwin, Caroline Clarke Jones, Janie Ruffin Sims, 

Elizabeth Btrd Henderson, Josephine Tonnoffski, 

Elizabeth Hughes, Isabelle Hester Perry, Rebecca Bennehan Wood. 

Ruth Reynolds Critz. 
Elizabeth Woodard Leary, Business Manager. 
Amelia Pinckney Sturgeon, Asst. Bus. Mgr. 



EDITORIAL. 



Lent. 

Lent has come again with its solemnity, with its altar hangings of the 
purple of passion, with its shadow of the cross. We realize now per- 
haps more than at any other time, the significance of the Christian year. 
Lent is a time set apart by the church for preparation, for self-denial, 
for self-examination. Taking; Lent even in a sense not strictly re- 
ligious, it is good to "come away for a while and be still." A period 
of quietness is always good. At this time we see as always, the wisdom 
of the Mother Church, who, realizing the weakness of her children and 
their need for rest, calls them from the "fretful stir unprofitable" back 
into the shelter of her sweet communion. As church girls we have 
opportunities here with the daily services, and the additional voluntary 
services for making Lent mean a great deal. It rests with us how we 
use these opportunities. 

The Manufacture of Excitement. 

"Anything for the sake of excitement" is the cry we hear. 

'Now, in a school of this kind there is naturally very little real ex- 
citement. And so, what do we do ? Set ourselves about to manufacture 
it. And how do we do it? By talk, talk, talk; to put it plainly, by 



212 The St. Mary's Muse. . 

rank, unadulterated, never-ending gossip. A criticism that is often 
made of us is that we talk about each other so much, and it is a per- 
fectly just accusation. Is there nothing a girl can talk about except 
another girl ? Unless we wish to be the kind of women that eternally 
gossip we ought to do our best to break away from the habit of talking 
about each other, a habit which will grow on us more and more the 
oftener that we indulge. 



The WorK of the Literary Societies. 

The two Literary Societies, organized in 1900 for the purpose of 
promoting and cultivating literary taste and interest, have continued 
ever since with that purpose in view. The work in both societies is 
practically the same. 

From a business point of view, the following has been accomplished 
this year: In 5 A 36 new members were taken in, inE All the mid-year 
elections have been held, the constitution of 2 A revised, while that of 
E A n is even now in process of revision and the annual debaters and 
commencement marshals have been elected in both societies. The meet- 
ings have been held regularly every Wednesday night. Besides the 
meetings of the Societies there have been no entertainments except the 
receptions given in the fall by each Society to its new members ; but on 
four occasions there have been inter-society meetings : on Founder's 
Day, Thanksgiving Day, Lee's birthday, and on February 15th, when 
Mr. Lay gave his talk on "The Responsibility of Personal Charm." 
At the meetings of both societies there has usually been a talk by some 
member of the faculty and the girls have discussed subjects of interest 
in and out of school ; then, too, from time to time there have been de- 
bates which are always exciting. In 2 A such programs as this have 
often been supplemented by music, and inE All the recitation of two 
literary classics occurs at each meeting. But the greatest event in the 
literary societies will be the inter-society debate, occuring the 26th of 
April. I. H. P. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 213 

A Letter from Miss Jones. 

We are glad to publish the following letter from Miss Margaret Jones, 
who always took such an interest in all athletic affairs at the school. 
Miss Jones is this year at Teachers' College, Columbia University: 

To the St. Mary's Athletic Club: 

Dear Girls: — I thought perhaps you'd like me to tell you about a 
game of basket-ball I saw the other day — a match game between the 
Barnard College girls and the Teachers' College. 

The game was played in the Teachers' College Gymnasium, which 
is a great, beautiful room, light and splendidly equipped. The floor 
was marked off by painted strips and along the end walls, under the 
baskets, a row of mattresses on edge were placed, so there was no danger 
of knocks and bumps, such as we were so afraid of last year in your 
gymnasium. 

The Barnard gymnasium instructor, a young man, was referee, and 
a T. C. instructor kept time. They played the "girls rules," the 
chief difference, of course, being that the court is barred off into three 
divisions. In the middle the four centers must stay, and two guards 
and two forwards in each of the other two. It is a foul to cross the 
line. Then, you know, the ball can not be struck from the hand. The 
guard must be very watchful and shadow her forward so as to interfere 
with a throw, but must let the ball leave the hand before she strikes. It 
means less scrambling, and a rather leisurely game, but a very pretty 
one. 

Well, the Barnard girls were out in full to "root." A very pretty 
girl was in charge of the yelling, and conducted it in spirited college 
boy fashion. Pretty soon she called out, "Chris, come here and take 
the yelling," and disappeared, to emerge soon after in gymnasium suit, 
and to play center for the second half. She hadn't meant to play, but 
couldn't stand it after the game started. "Chris'' was a very good 
substitute in managing the yelling. 

The "yells" were like all yells. Some of them were songs, and very 
well sung, too. This is one of their best. You might turn it into a 
song and use it at St. Mary's : 



214 The St. Mary's Muse. 

O good gracious! 

How audacious 

That the others dare to face us ! 

Can they lick us? 

No-o-o-o-o-o-o ! 

The T. C. girls had plenty of good ones, too. One of their favorite 
ones was a set of verses they sang to cheer their players : Here's to 
(Bessie Young) ; Drink it down ! She's a (something appro- 
priate, two lines). You know that tune, and its very easy to make good 
verses to fit the players, and easy to sing. 

The game was very spirited, hut the Teachers led from the first. The 
Barnard girls were very fine on foul throws, and made, I think, every- 
one they had, except one. 

They played twenty-minute halves, hut once in each half the referee 
called a three-minute halt for rest, when the girls seemed exhausted. 
They just deducted the time and at the end of the rest put the ball in 
play where it was last in movement. The final score was 9-12 in favor 
of T. C, Barnard being much behind till near the end. 

One of the nicest things about the game w'as that it was so good- 
natured, and yet there was plenty of enthusiasm. 

I thought of you girls all the time and wished you could have been 
there to enjoy the game with me. 

I hope your own ball games are keeping up. Arrange a big match 
game before it gets too hot, and let me read about it in The Muse. 

Yours with the best of wishes, 

Margaret M. Jones. 

New York, March 1, 1911. 



Josephine. 

"Josephine" is a musical drama for which Mr. Owen has written 
some incidental music and songs. It will be presented by amateur 
Raleigh talent under Mr. Owen's direction later on in the spring for 
the benefit of the St. Mary's Alumna? Association. The following is a 
skeleton of the plot: 

Josephine, the heroine, is found as a baby on the battlefield, and 
brought up by the French soldiers. They call her the "Daughter of the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 215 

Regiment." In the course of time she falls in love with a peasant, and 
he with her, and he, in order to be near her, becomes a soldier. But of 
course a little trouble has to arise, and it takes the form of a lady of 
quality who says that Josephine is her niece (she is, in reality, her 
daughter) and carries her off very reluctant to her home of polite life 
and society. The girl naturally does not take kindly to the drawing- 
room, and affords the audience much amusement by shocking the fas- 
tidious guests of her aunt. Eventually the lover becomes an officer, 
finds a way to Josephine, and the mother, softened by her own experi- 
ences in days gone by, consents to the marriage, and confesses that she 
is Josephine's mother. The comedy and music is light throughout, in 
a word it is exactly suited to the diverting and highly improbable story. 

R. B. O. 



Timely Topics. 



The Proper Way to Think,- 

My dears, a thinking woman 

It is difficult to find; 
But I do not hold this fault results 

From any lack of mind. 

Nor am I for one moment 
Of her intellect complaining; 

Her carelessness, I am convinced, 
Results from lack of training. 

Though the Bible is my subject, 
I digress — I think I ought — 

For I think I'm fully justified 
In teaching proper thought. 

You have found from previous study 
Moses learned to "handle men," 

And now who can tell the color 
Of Job's old red turkey hen ? 

This question is important, 

And a point you should not miss, 

For your knowledge is dependent 
To a great degree on this. 



216 The St. Mary's Muse. 



And another puzzling question 

I would now propound to you: 
If Abraham set out from Ur, 

Pray what did Sarah do? 

Why, you say, there's no connection! 

I can hardly think you sane, 
For 'tween Ur and her the likeness, dears, 

Is absolutely plain. 

Now, the husbands of two women died 

( A natural thing to do ) . 
'Tis a most distressing question, 

But what were these women two? 

Why, these poor, forsaken ladies twain 

Were widows, don't you see? 
And now who's the worthy sire 

Of the sons of Zebedee? 

If the tribe of Dan was on the left 

Of Jordan's rushing tide, 
What tribe — your whole attention — 

Was not on the other side? 

And if Samuel judged in Ramah, 

As I'm sure you've often heard, 
What was the place where Samuel judged? 

The answer is one word. 

This question stumped my Ethics class, 

So answer just as quick as 
Your mind can work, and tell me now 

How many ends a stick has. 

If you'd give each day an hour 

Thus to keen deliberation, 
The increase in your power for thought 

Would be a revelation. 

Nell Battle Lewis. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ceuikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnee Association. 

Honorary President - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

H n x, m . BT Vir-v PnFsinFNTs I Mrs - Kate de R - Me ares, Wilmington. 

Monorary Vice-Presidents } Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh. 

President -.- - Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 

Secretary ... - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer ... - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 

Field Secretary - Miss Mary F. Henderson .Salisbury. 

A Much Appreciated Letter. 

65 State Street. Portland, Maine, 
To the Editors — January 14, 1911. 

Dear Girls: — Miss Katie's birthday seems the most appropriate time to be writ- 
ing to St. Mary's. * * * 

The names of the girls of today are almost as familiar now as the old ones; and 
whenever I see the names of twenty years ago recurring, I begin to wonder if this is 
a daughter or a niece of the families whom I knew best. It was very pleasant to 
hear, through your columns, of the marriage of my old friends, Mary Bynum and 
Mary Gatlin, from whom I had not heard for years; and to read of Miriam Lanier, 
Mabel Green Elliott, and many others, in connection with the Smedes Centennial. 

The latest number recalls the merry days when I played Chauncey Oglethorpe in 
"A Box of Monkeys," in '93 or '94. With the egotism of amateur actors, I have 
forgotten the rest of the cast; but the program is stowed away in the attic of my 
own home in Massachusetts — together with Miss Slater's rhyming invitation to a 
"spread" for the actors, the week after the play. We really ought to have feasted 
her, after all the work she had in coaching us. 

The principal of my school here has a small niece, Virginia Royster, at St. Mary's; 
so The Muse has a personal interest for two people in this far-off corner of the 
States; and time fails me to tell of all the pleasant recollections, and connections, 
which it has brought to me. 

With all good wishes, 

Very cordially yours, Jessie Degen, '94. 



Died: At Y}er Home in Oberlin, March 26, 1911, Lavinia Locl^hart 

In the passing of "Aunt Lavinia," for many years a faithful servant 
at the School, St. Mary's girls will realize that they have lost a friend 
who knew well how to appreciate their many kindnesses to her when she 
had grown too old to support herself. They will remember their pleas- 



218 The St. Mary's Muse. 

ant walks through the woods to her home and her pleasure in giving 
them the flowers which she raised specially for her St. Mary friends. 

Her life, though an humble one., is an example to us of patience and 
fortitude in suffering and trial ; of loyalty to her friends and to* what 
she believed to be right. 



Alumnae Weddings. 



Ducey -Sand ford. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Andrew Sandford 

announce the marriage of their daughter 

Carol Cabell 

to 

Ensign David Francis Ducey 

United States Navy 

on Saturday, the twenty-fifth of March 

nineteen hundred and eleven 

Norfolk, Virginia 



Ball-CIarKson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Garden Clarkson 

request the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Emily Heyward 

to 

Mr. Alexander Kelsall Ball 

Saturday evening, April the twenty-second 

at seven o'clock 

The Episcopal Chapel 

in the Sand Hills 

Eastover, South Carolina 



The St. Mary's Muse. 219 

Dexter-ParKer. 

Mr. John Daniel Parker 

requests the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of his daughter 

Caroline Ashe 

to 

Mr. Charles Edwin Dexter 

on Tuesday evening, the eighteenth of April 

at seven o'clock 

Saint Paul's Church 

Monroe, North Carolina 



Mott-Trapier. 

Mrs. Edward Shubrick Trapier 

requests the honor of jour presence 

at the marriage of her daughter 

Elizabeth Graham 

to 

to Mr. Floyd Stephen Mott 

on Tuesday afternoon, April the eighteenth 

at half after seven o'clock 

Christ Church 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



Dix-Dortch. 

Miss Hogg 

requests the honor of 

your presence at the marriage of her niece 

Miss Janet Dortch 

to 

Mr. George Evertson Dix 

on the evening of Wednesday, the nineteenth of April 

at half after six o'clock 

at Christ Church 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



220 The St. Mary s Muse. 

Elliott-MacRae. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Strange Ma.cE.ae 

request the honor of your presence at 

the marriage of their daughter 

Dora Virginia 

to 

Mr. George Douglas Elliot, Jr. 

Wednesday, the twenty-sixth of April 

at eight o'clock 

nineteen hundred and eleven 

Chapel of the Cross 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 



A Surprise Party. 

On Saturday afternoon, February 25th, Mrs. I. M. Pittenger enter- 
tained with a surprise party in honor of her niece, Miss Tissie Harrison. 
The Grill Room was transformed by the decorations of greens, palms, 
etc., and the shaded lights threw a soft glow over the lovely table, sur- 
rounded by seventeen happy faces. A large vase of beautiful pink car- 
nations formed the centerpiece. At the head of the table was the huge 
birthday cake with eighteen candles. The color scheme of pink and white 
was carried out in every detail, mints, ices, etc. Dainty place-cards at- 
tached to bunches of violets enabled the guests to find their seats without 
difficulty. The "perfectly luscious" refreshments were served in five 
courses after which the cake was passed around. Beginning at the right 
of the honoree, each girl lighted a candle, blowing it out as she made a 
wish for Tissie. Then amid much laughter and merriment the guests 
"toasted her in wine ( ?)" 

Those who were fortunate enough to be so hospitably entertained 
were : Miss Sutton, Helen Robinson, Ruth Wells, Elizabeth Morris, 
Tinsley Harrison, Patsey Smith, Katherine Parker, Caroline Jones, 
Mary Louise Manning, Julia Borden, Ruth Critz, Rebecca Wood, 
Amelia Sturgeon, Nell Lewis, Byrd Henderson and Hortense Jones. 



READ !— MARK !— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 

eaders of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 

principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 

them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 

it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



' It's worth the difference " 



WHARTON & TYREE 



" Workers in Artistic Photography" 



The Senior Class offers 

THE 1911 ANNUAL MUSE 

$2.50 

On sale May 1st. Send in your order. 



THE DQBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 
MILLINERY 



Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES AND SHIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEftRGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVII.LE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGn, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



Herbert Rosenthal 

LADIES' FINE SHOES 



INSURE IN THE 

Jefferson Standard Life Ins. Go. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Strongest in the South 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 
COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 



131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 



COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 



5 West Hargett St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY 

CANDY — CHINA — TOYS 
PICTURES STATIONERY 



NORFOLK 

OYSTE RS 

DAILY 
Wade's Fish Market 

113 E. Martin St. Both Phones 356 


J. SCHWARTZ 

RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 


ROBERT SIMPSON 

DRUGGIST AND PRESCRIPTIONI8T 


H. T. HICKS & COMPANY 

For Toilet Requisites and 
Colds Drinks 


GOOD THINGS ALWAYS AT 


BRETSCH'S BAKERY 


ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 


EAT 
BETTS' ICE CREAM 


RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 



Advertisements. 



fart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



POOL & CROCKER 

up-to-date 
FOOTWEAR 

Special Attention to Fit 

105 Fayetteville St. 



KING-CRO WELL'S DRUG STORE 



AND SODA FOUNTAIN 



/orner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 
President. Treasurer. 

G. H. DORTCH, R. S. BUSBEE, 

Secretary. General Manager. 



Dr. L. J. PEGRAM 

DENTIST 



Office 209% Fayetteville St. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
College Postals 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King'Crowell 



I. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON <fc HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING NOTHING 
EXCEEDS THE 

GAS RANGE 

Always Ready. No Dirt. No Ashes 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the Wetsbach, "The Light that Does 
Not Flicker." 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



DARNELL & THOMAS 
Music House 

Established 1887 

Pianos, Organs, Small Instruments, Sheet 
Music and Instruction Books 



Raleigh, 



North Carolina 



MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 
OF RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital 1100,000.00 4 per cent paid in Savings 

Department 
E. C. Duncan, Pres. W. B. Drake, Jr., Cash. 

A. H. FETTING 

Manufacturer of Greek Letter Fraternity 

Jewelry, 213 N. Liberty St., Baltimore, Md. 

Factory: 213 Little Sharp St. 

49=" Memorandum package sent to any fraternity 
member through the Secretary of Chapter. Special 
designs and estimates furnished on class pins, rings, 
medals for athletic meets, etc. 




CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 
and Power 

f 174 



Both Phones: 



I 226 



The Yarborough House 

invites your patronage 



K I N'G ' S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



E. M. UZZELL & CO. 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

only high grade work 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

INSURANCE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE 
Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 
THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 



SEND TO 

Plummer's Stables 

For Riding and Driving Horses 

YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 

S. Wilmington Street 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. PULLEN, 

Pres., Chas. Root, Cashier. Capital and Surplus 
$75,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 



Advertisements. 



Chas. E. Johnson F. H. Briggs 

PRESIDENT CASHIER 

THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST GO. 

"ROUND 8TEPS BANK" SINCE 1865 

WE APPRECIATE OLD FRIENDS 

AND 

WELCOME THE NEW 
4% Time Certificates of Deposit Call at the Bank 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

Jolly &- Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 

DR. F. D. CASTLEBURY 

DENTIST 

AYCOCK & WINSTON 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW RALEIGH, N. C. 

JOHN C. DREWRY 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 

Dr. V. E. TURNER 

DENTIST 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 

Dr. D. E. EVERETT 

DENTIST 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 

HUNTER BROS., & BREWER COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

J. R. FERRALL & COMPANY— GROCERIES 

BEST OP EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 

222 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

It will well pay you to buy your Ready-to-Wear 

Garments at our store because we sell 

better goods for less money 

THE FASHION 203-205 Fayetteville St. 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

109 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 

Why is Brantley's Fountain the Most Popular ? 
ASK THE GIRLS 

ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 




St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 

Raleigh, N C. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 

C. E. HARTGE— ARCHITECT 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

MRS. FRANK REDFORD-MILLINERY 

13 West Hargett St. Phone 632 

10% off to Faculty and Boarding Pupils 

SHOES 

12 East Martin Street 
PEEBLES & EDWARDS 

DR. ERNEST H. BEOUGHTON 

DENTIST 
116 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

DR. E. B. HOWLE 

DENTIST 

BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

Books and Stationery 

113 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 

GREEN & WATSON 

i pT Storp 
11 West Hargett St" Raleigh, N. C. 



WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 

Phone 953-R 

217^2 Fayetteville Street 



N. H. MOORE 

Repairer of Fine Shoes 

Fayetteville Street 



MISS SMITH 

DRESSMAKER 

Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware 
Repairing promptly done 

Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located at 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th St?., Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 



School Calendar. 
April-May, 1911. 

April 9 : Palm Sunday. Ann vial Visitation of the Bishop at 5 : 00. 

April 14: Good Friday. Holy Day. 

April 16: Easter Day. Services at 7:30, 11:00 and 5:00. 

April 24 Monday, 8:30 p. m. : Peace-St. Mary's Series. Final Concert. Paul 
Kefer, Cellist. 

April 26, Wednesday, 8:00 p. m. : Inter-Society Debate. "Resolved, That the Mod- 
ern Stage Has a Beneficial Rather Than a Harmful Influence." 

April 27, Thursday, 8:30 p. m. : Diploma Recital. Miss Ella Dorroh, piano, assisted 
by the St. Mary's Orchestra. 

April 29, Saturday, 8:30 p. m.: The Dramatic Club in "The Importance of Being 
Earnest." 

May 1, Monday, 8:30 p. m. : Organ Recital. Miss B. M. Luney. 

May 4, Thursday, 8:30 p. m.: Certificate Recital. Miss Mary Mitchell Chamber- 
lain, piano, assisted by the St. Mary's Chorus. 

May 6, Saturday, 8:30 p. m. : Lucy Bratton Chapter in "When Patty Went to Col- 
lege." 

May 11, Thursday, 8:30 p. m.: Pupils' Recital. Miss Ada Burfoot, piano, and Miss 
Emilie Rose Knox, violin. 

May 12, Friday: Alumnae Day. Sixty-ninth Anniversary of the Founding of St. 
Mary's. 

May 13, Saturday, 8:30 p. m.: Teachers' Recital. Misses Sherwin and Paulsen, vio- 
linists; Miss Luney, pianist. 

May 15, Monday, 8:30 p. m. : Certificate Recital. Miss Amelia Sturgeon, piano, 
and Miss Julia Borden, piano. 

May 20, Saturday, 8:30 p. m. : Certificate Recital. Miss Zona Shull, soprano, 
assisted by Mr. Henry Grady Miller, baritone. 

May 16-20: Examination Week. 

May 21-25 : Commencement Week. 



Location Central for the Carolina^. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. " 

(for girls and young women). 

69th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 15, 1910. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 26,. 1911. 



St. Mary's 



1. TEE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 
S. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



offers instruction in these 

Departments: I £ THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1910-11 are enrolled 225 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and oilier information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector. 






iWap, 1911 



&aletgf), M. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Vol. XV. May, 1911. No. 8. 



What Cantaloupes Can be Used F° r - 



A New Use for Cantaloupes. 

"Oh ! if that 'phone would only stop ringing," exclaimed Sue the 
maid, who, to her mind, had done nothing but answer the 'phone that 
morning. 

"Hello ! is that 380 ?" said an excited voice. "Well, may I speak to 
Miss Kandolph ?" 

"Yes, sir." 

The maid tapped sharply upon Peggy Randolph's door. "Come in," 
called a sleepy voice. 

"Miss Peggy, somebody wishes to speak to you at the 'phone." 

"Tell them I'm asleep," answered Peggy. "But suppose it is Bob !" 
She quickly picked up the 'phone, which she kept near her bed, and took 
down the receiver. 

"All right." 

"Is that you, Peggy ? Everything is ready !" cried Bob. 

"Oh, that is great ! What time did you say you were coming? I'm 
too excited for words !" 

"Five this afternoon. Say, you had better write it down before you 
forget." 

"I won't forget," responded Peggy, who was thinking of what her 
poor dear papa was going to say when he heard that she had eloped with 
Bob Phillips. 

"j'ist think, tomorrow we shall be safe on our way to New York!" 
Bob exultingly called back to her. 

"Bob, please don't talk so over the 'phone, for somebody is sure to 
hear." 

"But, dear, I can't help it." 

"No time for that now, though, Bob." 



222 The St. Mary's Muse. 

"Well, I will be waiting by the tea pagoda, for I am afraid to bring; 
the car very near the house." 

a Oh, dearest, I hear somebody coming! Good-bye until five." 

Down went the receiver. 
"Mercy! that sounds like papa. I wonder what time it is." Peggy 
pressed the bell, and in a second the maid appeared with her breakfast. 

"What time is it ?" 

"Twelve-thirty," answered Sue. 

"I thought I heard papa coming up the steps a few minutes ago. 
He hasn't gone to the office yet ?" asked Peggy. 

"I think I heard him say that he wasn't going to his office today, 
ma'am ; and I heard him and your mother inviting some people to have 
tea this afternoon with them." 

"Heavens ! In the tea house ! Sue, please hand me the 'phone." 

"Hello ! Is that 6973 ? Well, is Mr. Phillips there ? May I speak 
to him ? What ! he isn't going to be there any more today ? Thank 
you, perhaps I may catch him at the club. Good-bye." 

"I just must find him. Suppose he drives up to the pagoda and finds 
papa and mamma and lots of other people already there. What must 
I do ?" 

Her efforts to reach Bob over the 'phone were in vain. Never had 
Peggy Randolph spent such an exciting day. At ten minutes to five she 
was standing by her bedroom window. There was no possibility of 
getting away, for her younger sister had company on the porch and then 
there was that tea party in the pagoda. 

"I could pretend I was going shopping, but here's my suit case and I 
will just have to have it if we are going to New York." 

At five minutes to five she was almost wild. 

"How on earth is Bob to know that I can't possibly meet him ?" 

Just then Peggy happened to look out of the window and saw the 
grocery boy carrying towards the rear of the house a basket of canta- 
loupes, ordered for the next morning's breakfast. Suddenly a brilliant 
idea came to her. 

"Sue, get me some cord and a cantaloupe as quickly as possible, and 
ask no questions !" 



The St. Mary's Muse. 223 

Arriving at the tea house at five, Bob Phillips found to his horror not 
Peggy but all the other members of the family. 

Necessity is the mother of invention. Bob quickly decided that he 
would leisurely saunter up the path towards the house as if to call, but 
hardly had he gotten out of sight of the tea house when he suddenly 
stopped, and then turning he left the grounds by a side gate, a sadder 
but a wiser man. 

Actions had been far more eloquent than words — from Peggy's win- 
dow, suspended on a string, hung a cant-a-loupe. 

Sadie Williams. 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT. 



Chihuahua and Its People. 



HELEN SCOBELL. 



Two hundred miles directly south of El Paso, Texas, in a valley be- 
tween high mountains, on a plateau four thousand nine hundred feet 
above the sea, is the capital of Chihuahua State, the city of Chihuahua, 
and though restricted in area it has a rather dense population of about 
thirty-five thousand. The houses, with the exception of a few modern 
buildings, are of only one story and are built of adobes, or mud bricks. 
There are no yards surrounding the buildings, but instead there are 
inside courtyards on which all the rooms look down. Most of these 
courtyards consist of a garden bounded by stone walks, and, in addition, 
some have a portion of the patio, or yard, roofed over, thus forming an 
enclosed court which is used very much as a porch is used in this country. 
As there are no side yards, the houses are all built touching each other, 
thus enabling one to walk from one's own roof onto those of the entire 
block. 

The public buildings of interest in Chihuahua consist of a very large 
Opera House built of red brick and carved white stone, adorned inside 
with beautiful paintings and brilliantly lighted both inside and out, and 
is often the scene of hundreds of pleasure seekers, for all Mexicans love 
entertainments and amusements. Other buildings of which Chihuahua 



224 The St. Mary's Muse. 

is justly proud are three government buildings, one erected in the eigh- 
teenth century, but the others are modern. The city water supply comes 
through an aqueduct from a distance of five miles, the aqueduct itself 
being over two hundred years old. 

The principal church is the Roman Catholic cathedral, a large edifice 
built in the seventeenth century, facing the plaza, or general gathering 
place of the people. This plaza is a large, open square in the center of 
the city, around which is a very wide cement walk provided with iron 
benches, and in the middle is a large bandstand, where the military 
band plays on Sundays and Thursdays. Beautiful lawns and well-kept 
flower beds add to the beauty of the scene. In other parts of the city 
are three similar plazas, as well as an extensive park, thus affording 
ample space and opportunity for much social intercourse. 

While the city and surroundings are beautiful and attractive in many 
ways, probably of more interest to those who have never seen a Mexican 
city will be an idea of the life of the Mexicans themselves. The lan- 
guage and customs are very different from those of Americans. Spanish 
slightly mixed with the Mexican Indian is predominantly spoken, a lan- 
guage rich and musical. The prevailing religion is Roman Catholic. It 
is customary, therefore, for the citizens to go to early mass or high noon 
services on Sunday, after which to be free to attend dances, the plaza 
or the park, to hear the band play, seeking amusement of various kinds. 
Events which afford much pleasure are picnics in the surrounding 
woods where, having spread a carpet on the sand, many dance to the 
music of violins. Others of the favorite amusements in Mexico are 
the Sunday afternoon bull fights and cock fights, which the people 
attend in large numbers. 

The Mexicans are very fond of holidays and of celebrating, so when- 
ever there is the slightest excuse for a gala day, they will certainly take 
advantage of it, having music in the park in the afternoons and music 
and fireworks in the plaza at night. During these celebrations the 
girls walk in one direction around the walks of the plaza and the men in 
another, though occasionally a girl is permitted by her chaperone to 
promenade with a man. 

Though baseball is popular in Mexico, football and other American 
sports are hardly known. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 225 

The highest class dresses practically as the Americans do, and the 
dress of the men of the middle class also differs in no marked way, with 
the exception of often wearing long capes instead of coats. However, the 
men of the lowest class wear a sort of blouse which they knot loosely at 
the bottom in front, home-made sandals, and usually broad-brimmed 
hats with very high peaked crowns. The women, on the other hand, 
rarely wear hats. They usually wear soft mantillas or shawls draped 
gracefully over the head ; though as a protection from the cold they wrap 
zarapes or blankets around the head. The dress, though not conven- 
tional with our habits in that line, is often very pretty and effective, 
particularly becoming to the brunette beauty of most Mexican girls. 



Everyday Sketches. 

No. 12. 



Commencement Reveries. 

A warm May evening, at that wonderful hour of the day when the last 
rays of the setting sun are fading softly, and light and oncoming dark- 
ness are merging into those perfect moments of twilight, mystical mo- 
ments in which one loves to spend the time in idle dreams and quiet 
revery. The girl sitting alone on the bench under the guarding oaks, 
waiting for her chum to join her, is quietly drinking in the beauty of 
all and wishing that there were to be many more such evenings, dread- 
ing the partings that Commencement always brings. Her letters lay 
unopened in her lap as things out of harmony with her surroundings. 

Fragments of merry banter and peals of girlish laughter come to her 
ears from the groups of daintily gowned girls standing around, exchang- 
ing confidences and idle talk of happenings of the day, others gaily 
making engagements for dances among the merry throng assembling in 
the old-fashioned parlor, where some one is playing the latest waltz. 

Breaths of sweetest perfume are wafted across the grove on the sum- 
mer breeze, laden with the fragrance of clover and wild honeysuckle 
which grow in wild profusion in distant parts of the campus. Overhead 
tiny stars begin to glimmer one by one through the leafy boughs of the 
overshadowing trees, and the silvery moon in all its glory is rising 



226 The St. Mary's Muse. 

above the chapel, casting a bewitching light of softest radiance over the 
whole. 

The strains of the recessional hymn sung by the sweet girlish voices 
as the long line solemnly filed from chapel are echoing faintly in her 
mind, and for a moment she is in spirit again on bended knee before the 
flower-crowned altar, receiving the benediction of the minister's parting 
words resounding through the hushed stillness that has fallen upon the 
kneeling figures. 

Her thoughts fly swiftly over the bygone months of this her Senior 
year, dwelling with especial tenderness upon certain events which have 
been to her the dearest experiences of her life, events which have so aided 
in the development of her character that without them she feels the Best 
would never be hers to attain. The friendships formed, the lessons 
learned, and the knowledge acquired during the four years spent be- 
neath the stately old walls of this, her beloved school she is so soon to 
leave forever, have exerted a far greater influence upon her life than 
even she herself realizes, but the consciousness of Truth, Honor, Earn- 
estness, Loyalty, and Love are emblazoned in burning letters on her 
heart, all lessons that are treasured by her as the rarest gifts of her 
Alma Mater. 

A voice is calling her name, and though it is the voice of her dearest 
friend it breaks with harshness upon the quiet revery of her thoughts, 
recalling her from the Land of Dreams and Ideals to the realization of 
the present. Rising slowly from her place on the weather beaten bench, 
she advances to meet the friend with these words echoing sadly in her 
heart, sadly for sadness is ever mingled with joy at Commencement, and 
yet the words have a joyous, exultant ring — "I shall keep the compass 
needle of my soul true to the North Star of a Great Ambition ! I shall 
keep the tryst !" Anne B. Field. 



Commencement at Cornell. 



At this Commencement season it may be of interest to the readers of 
The Muse to read something of the similar festivity at Cornell Uni- 
versity. And as firsthand knowledge is generally most valuable in 



The St. Mary's Muse. 227 

description, I shall merely relate to the best of my ability the events of 
"Senior Week" of June, 1910. 

The week started Friday with the musical club's concert, followed by 
dances given by the Phi Psi and Sigma Phi fraternities to the Seniors 
and their guests. Saturday the Seniors played baseball against the 
alumni, who hold class reunions at this time of the year, and this 
event was most amusing. Each class that "reunes" adopts some fan- 
tastic costume, and on the day of the baseball game they all form in line 
with many bands — some good, some otherwise — and parade all over 
Ithaca. And on the baseball field their antics were positively side- 
splitting. The game itself was rather well played. 

Sunday the Baccalaureate sermon was preached. To this function 
all the Seniors wore their caps and gowns — and it is one of the few 
functions at which the entire class appears as a body. The sermon, de- 
livered by the Eector of St. Andrew's Church of Buffalo, 1ST. Y., was 
most impressive, and I'm sure that few who heard it will ever forget 
its message. 

Monday night the masque. The men's dramatic club gave "The 
Importance of Being Earnest." Those who saw this play recently at 
St. Mary's can fully appreciate, I'm sure, the amusement that was 
added by having the girl parts taken by men. 

Tuesday there were so many alumni banquets and meetings of differ- 
ent sorts going on that nothing that pertained directly to Senior week 
was scheduled. But each of us found more than enough to do in 
endeavoring to show to fond friends and relations all the beauties of 
Ithaca that we had been raving about during the four years just past. 

But Wednesday was the crowning day of all. We girls had our 
Senior banquet from two till six in the evening, and it was the hap- 
piest and at the same time saddest event of the whole four years — we 
had come together for the last time and it was not pleasant to think of. 
But the fun came when each girl in turn was solemnly asked if she had 
appropriated any one's undying love and affection. Only seven of the 
eighty-five girls 'fessed up, but we all had a sneaking suspicion that 
some had quibbled. This was one big event of the day — the other was 
the Senior ball, the last of a series of four dances which as a class 1910 
had given. And it is the one dance of the year which the faculty allows 



228 The St. Mary's Muse. 

to continue after 4 a. m. And you can well imagine that the sun was 
already up when "Home, Sweet Home" was played. 

And then Thursday — the last of everything! At 11 a. m. the entire 
Senior class, six hundred and twenty-five in number, all in their caps 
and gowns, preceded by the faculty in all its glorious apparel, marched 
across the campus, into the armory, and there each received his degree — 
the reward, presumably, of four years work, but which at that time 
seemed like a compulsory ticket of exit. After these exercises, we all 
went up on the campus again and there were read the class history and 
prophecy — and for the very last time 1910 stood together and sang 
"Alma Mater." N. VanD. 



Notes. 



Caroline Jones and Elizabeth Hughes, Editors. 



The Music Festival, April 18th and 19th.. 

The May Festival, which came much earlier this year, was well 
patronized by St. Mary's girls. This series of concerts, given under 
the auspices of the Raleigh Choral Society with Mr. Wade R. Brown as 
director, takes place every year at the Academy of Music. The pro- 
gram of the first concert consisted of Handel's oratorio, "The Messiah," 
which, accompanied by Victor Herbert's orchestra, was sung by four 
noted soloists and the Raleigh Choral Class. The most popular concert, 
perhaps, was the Tuesday afternoon one, when Victor Herbert's orches- 
tra played. All the selections were thoroughly enjoyed, but none of 
them were more charming than the parts played of Victor Herbert's 
own opera, "ISTatona." The last concert was another choral production, 
"The Swan and the Skylark." 

As usual at Easter there are many gifts made for the use of the 
Chapel. This year the Altar Guild presented the Chapel with an alb, 
amice and girdle and St. Anne's Chapter gave a silver wafer box. The 
memorial window to Gertrude Sullivan was also dedicated. This win- 
dow was given by her old school friends and comrades. 

One of the most unique evenings we have ever had at St. Mary's was 
when Mr. Plater came up to whistle for us. Mr. Plater is one of the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 229 

two best whistlers in the world, but we all think he is the very best. 
Col. Olds came up with him and added much to the pleasure of the 
evening by asking for volunteers from among the girls to play and sing. 
The evening was altogether very informal and was most enjoyable. 

Intersociety Debate, April 26th. 

After having had, at different intervals throughout the winter, a 
series of debates in which both the E A n and 2 A literary societies had 
discussed, in the most interesting manner, questions of expediency, came 
the inter-society debate on the evening of April the twenty-sixth. From 
the E A n Society Patsey Smith and Elizabeth Leary, and from the 2 A 
Tinsley Harrison and Ruth Critz were chosen to decide whether or not 
the modern stage has a beneficial rather than a harmful influence — the 
affirmative side being taken by E An and the negative by 2 A. 

In a fashion truly Pythian the contestants entered into the spirit of 
the debate. Miss Smith began the discussion and, after having given 
some very plausible reasons why the matter at hand was a weighty one, 
proceeded to prove that the stage had been an important factor in bring- 
ing about the progress of the nation by affording healthy amusement, 
giving a conception of right and wrong, and developing the aesthetic 
sense. She admitted the fact that evils did exist, but, at the same time, 
asked this question : "What would be the good of trying to teach a lesson 
from the parable of the Prodigal Son if we left unmentioned all the 
prodigality and told only of the home-coming and the father's welcome ?" 

Miss Critz was the first to take up the negative point of view. She 
admitted that the stage had possibilities, but proved that according to 
facts, advantage had not been taken of the possibilities in a way which 
had been beneficial. In her conclusion she quoted what Tom Moore had 
said of popular songs — "So many good tunes are turned over to the 
Devil." 

Both Miss Leary and Miss Harrison continued the argument taken 
up respectively by their colleagues, each citing instances to show that 
the stage was, first, in Miss Leary's hands, beneficial, and then, in Miss 
Harrison's, harmful. Miss Leary contended that there could be no one 
who would doubt the beneficial effects of Shakespeare ; Miss Harrison 



230 The St. Mary's Muse. 

I 

regretted that it was not Shakespeare who was appreciated by the ma- 
jority, but rather plays "with spice enough, meaning vice enough." 

The rebuttals were short and to the point ; the affirmative maintained 
that the aesthetic benefit outweighed the demoralizing harm; the nega- 
tive asserted that the benefit was greatly overshadowed by the evil, 
and the judges, Prof. Summey of the A. & M., Dr. Shore and Mr. 
Joseph B. Cheshire, Jr., with a decision of two to one, gave the negative 
the palm. 

The audience was highly entertained from the beginning to the end. 
The debates themselves were exceedingly interesting, and the manner 
in which they were spoken by the four contestants would have done credit 
to any school of oratory. It wa£ indeed gratifying to those interested in 
the spirit of the two literary societies to note, by the many bouquets of 
flowers received by the debaters, how eager the girls were to show their 
interest. A. N. B. 






April 27th — Graduate Recital — Miss Ella Dorroh. 

Miss Dorroh' s graduate recital on April 27th was delightful. She 

has been studying under Miss Dowd for several years, and last year 

gave a certificate recital. As a musician Miss Dorroh excels, and her 

program, as before, was thoroughly enjoyed and was entirely a success. 

The St. Mary's Orchestra assisted her with several very attractive 

selections. 

PROGRAMME. 

I. Sonata, Op. 7 Grieg 

Allegro Moderate 
II. Impromptu, Op. 142, No. 3 Schubert 

III. Waltz in A flat, Op. 34, No. 1 Chopin 

Etude, Op. 10, No. 5 Chopin 

IV. Symphonie, No. 1 Schumann 

Allegro. 
Spring Song . . -. Mendelssohn 

Orchestra. 

V. Gondoliera, "Venezia e Napoli" Liszt 

VI. Tarantelle, Op. 27, No. 2 Moszkoivski 

VII. Concerto, C major Beethoven 

Allegro. 

Second Piano — Miss Ada Btjrfoot. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 231 

"The Importance of Being Earnest," a play by Oscar Wilde, was 
given by the Dramatic Club on the 29th of April. The "all-star" cast 
was as follows : 

CAST. 

John Worthing, J. P Miss Kate Smith 

Algernon Moncrieff Miss Helen McArthub 

Rev. Canon Chasuble, D.D Miss Mary Owen 

Merriman ( Butler ) Miss Elise Lloyd 

Lane (Man Servant) Miss Marie Thomas 

Lady Bracknell Miss Mary Gaither 

Hon. Gwendolen Fairfax Miss Elizabeth Morris 

Cecily Cardew Miss Tinsley Harrison 

Miss Prism (Governess) Miss Byrd Henderson 

The last of the Peace-St. Mary's concerts was held Monday night, 

April the twenty-fourth. The following notice of it is taken from the 

Evening Times: 

PAUL KEEFER, SOLO 'CELLIST. 

The Last Concert in Peace-St. Mary's Series a Great Success. 

Paul Keefer, the celebrated solo 'cellist, appeared at St. Mary's last night, this 
being the last in the series of Peace-St. Mary's concerts, which have furnished so 
much delight during this season. 

He was greeted by a large and most appreciative audience, who enjoyed every 
number to the fullest. Mr. Keefer has a most pleasing personality and he graciously 
responded to many encores and at the conclusion of Schumann's "Traumerei" there 
was no appeasing the audience until it was played over again. 

Mr. Blinn Owen, as usual, was a sympathetic accompanist. 

programme. 
Sonata ( Seventeenth Century ) Corelli 

( a ) Aria Bach 

(b) Allegro Appassionata Saint Saens 

( c ) Gavotte Hadley 

Symphonie Variations Boellman 

( a ) Traumerei Schumann 

(b) Hungarian Rhapsody Papper 

Organ Recital at St. Mary's, May 1st. 

The organ recital Monday evening, May 1, in St. Mary's Chapel, 
given by Miss Bertha M. Luney, assisted by Miss Sherwin, violinist, 
and by Dr. Hubert Royster, baritone, was an artistic success greatly 
enjoyed by the large audience assembled. 



232 The St. Maky's Muse. 

Miss Luney is a player of sound musicianship and masterly technique, 
with a thorough understanding of the organ and its resources. Her 
rendering of the entire program was faultless, but she was at her best, 
possibly, in the beautiful group number — the delicate "Gavotte" with its 
flute effects ; the melodious "Cloches de Sainte Marie," and the brilliant 
"Toccato." 

Miss Luney was ably assisted by Miss Sherwin, whose violin never 
fails to delight her hearers ; and by Dr. Hubert Royster, whose rich 
baritone is too seldom heard. Dr. Royster' s voice was particularly good 
in the second selection, "My God, My Father, While I Stray." 

The program is given below : 

1. Allegro Symphonique Luard-Selby 

Miss Luney. 

2. Lareo Handel 

Miss Sherwin. 

3. O For a Closer Walk with God Schnecker 

Dr. Royster. 

4. (a) Gavotte from Twelfth Sonata Padre Martin 

( b ) Les Cloches de Sainte Marie Lacey 

(c) Toccato Dubois 

Miss Luney. 

5. Preislied from The Meistersinger Wilhelmj '-Wagner 

Miss Sherwin. 

6. My God, My Father, While I Stray G. H. Marston 

Dr. Royster. 

7. (a) Canzona Wheeldon 

( b ) Allegro quasi Marcia Cole 

Miss Luney. 

May 4th— Certificate Recital — Miss Mary Mitchell Chamberlain. 

Miss Chamberlain, another pupil of Miss Dowd, assisted by the 
Chorus Class, gave her certificate recital Thursday night, May 4th. 
The concert was very pleasing and was greatly enjoyed by all. The 
program was as follows : 

1. Concerto in A major Mozart 

Allegro. 

(Miss Dorroh at Second Piano.) 

2. Sonata, Op. 26 Beethoven 

Andante with Var. I and II. 
Marcia. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 233 

3. Hunting Song Mendelssohn 

4. Chorus of Cigarette Girls from "Carmen" Bizet 

"Angelus" Chaminade 

Chorus Class. 
(Miss Ada Burfoot, Accompanist.) 

5. Prelude, C sharp minor Rachmaninoff 

Serenade Olsen 

6. A Deserted Farm (Woodland Sketches) MacDowell 

The Eagle MacDowell 

7. Scherzo and Chorale Dubois 

8. "Good Night" Reinecke 

Chorus Class. 

Palm Sunday and Easter. 

On the morning of Palm Sunday the baptismal service was adminis- 
tered, and at five o'clock Bishop Cheshire made his annual visitation 
and confirmed a class of eight. Easter Sunday was a beautiful day for 
the three services at the Chapel. The choral service at early commun- 
ion, which we have been having for the past few years, was especially 
sweet and impressive. 

Ada Burfoot's and Emilie K n °x's Recital. 

(From News and Observer.) 

Miss Ada Burfoot, pianist, and Miss Emilie Rose Knox, violinist, assisted by Miss 
Zona Shull, soprano, gave a most enjoyable musical program in St. Mary's audi- 
torium May 11th. 

Miss Burfoot is a young pianist of ability and much promise. She plays with 
good technique, clean, clear phrasing, and with a mental and musical grasp of the 
composer's thought. 

Miss Emilie Rose Knox has often before proved her talents as a young violinist. 
She plays with pure tone, with brilliant technique, with verve and magnetism; but 
her rendering of the de Beriot Concerto last evening was a surprise even to those 
who know her best and showed that her gifts are developing richly. The vocal 
number by Miss Shull, with violin obligato by Miss Knox, was very artistic in the 
interpretation and showed the lyric soprano to great advantage. Those who heard 
her will look forward to her own certificate recital on Saturday evening, May 20th. 

The programme is given below: 

1. Concerto in D major (first movement) Haydn 

Miss Burfoot. 
(Miss Dorroh at Second Piano.) 

2. (a) Am Fruhling Grieg 

( b ) Souvenir Drdla 

Miss Emilie Rose Knox. 



234 The St. Mart's Muse. 

3. (a) Gavotte from second violin Sonata Bach-Saint Saem 

(b) Etude Melodique in A Raff 

Miss Btjbfoot. 

4. Allegro moderato from 6th Concerto Be Beriot 

Miss Emilie Rose Knox. 

5. Fruhlingslied Weil 

Elegie Massenet 

Miss Shull. 
(Violin obligate by Miss Knox.) 

6. Etude ( Le Reveil des Fees ) Prudent 

Miss Burfoot. 



School News. 



Rebecca Wood and Ruth Critz, Editors. 



Easter Monday. 

Easter Monday was as all Easter Mondays heretofore have been, a 
very full one, and we were all "on the go" the whole day. In the morn- 
ing we went to the "track meet" between Carolina, A. and M., and 
Wake Forest. As we were all very thrilled over this, a large crowd 
went back out to A. and M. after lunch to the A. and M.-Wake Forest 
game. 

That night we had in the parlor our first dance since Lent. This 
was a regular german, and was very successfully led by "Mr." T. Har- 
rison and Miss Mary Louise Manning. We all enjoyed ourselves thor- 
oughly and all too soon the nine-thirty bell rang. 

Teas, Etc. 

The Junior Auxiliary Chapters are greatly indebted to Mrs. Lay for 

the good times she has given us this month. She has so delightfully 

entertained us that we wish to extend her a universal vote of thanks 

and appreciation. There has been quite a number of parties, teas and 

dinners, too, given to many of the girls by their town friends, which of 

course has helped much to cheer them up in their last month of "toil 

and trouble." 

A Surprise Party. 

The Muse Club was quite informally yet most happily "entertained" 
one night right after study hour by its "Faculty Director." The taste 



The St. Mary's Muse. 235 

of that delicious ice cream and the altogether good time we had will 
long be remembered. At this party Amelia Sturgeon and Anne Field 
were elected as Business Manager and Assistant Business Manager, 
respectively, for next year. Patsey Smith, at a former meeting, had 
been elected Editor-in-Chief, so the only other business that was trans- 
acted was the election of new Muse Club members for next year. 

FAay 8th and 9th — Ben Greet's Second Kdeigh Visit. 
Ben Greet has come and gone ! This was his second appearance in 
Raleigh, and as before his out-of-door plays have been long looked for. 
On account of bad weather on Monday night, ''The Tempest" was played 
in "our" Auditorium. "Twelfth Night" and "She Stoops to Conquer" 
were played, as advertised, in the yard of the Governor's Mansion. 
The entire series was simply fine and was enthusiastically enjoyed. Of 
course having "The Tempest" at St. Mary's caused great excitement 
for us. The actors dressed in Senior Hall, where their trunks were 
brought. The girls were delighted with them all, but "Ariel's" good 
looks, sweet voice and gracefulness were just too capitvating for words. 



School Gossip. 



Bessie Erwin and Btrd Henderson, Editors. 



Miss Buxton had a short visit from her mother in April, and on May 
5th, from her father, Hon. J. C. Buxton, and her sister, Mrs. Edwards 
from Dallas, Texas. 

Among the parents who have recently visited their daughters are: 
Mr. Burfoot of Elizabeth City, Mrs. Williams of Ringwood, Mr. Barber 
of Wilkesboro, Mrs. Manning and Mrs. Erwin of Durham, and Mr. 
Woodruff of Summerville. 

Among other relatives who have been at the school are Janie Sims's 
aunt, Miss RufKn ; Elizabeth Leary's and Rebecca Wood's brothers, who 
came down from Chapel Hill ; Amelia Sturgeon's sister, Mrs. Collier 
(nee Betty Sturgeon) of Atlanta ; Elizabeth Tarry's sister, Mary But- 
ler's brother, Bessie Barnwell's brother, Edith Bradshaw's sister, and 
Katherine Bruce's sister, who expects to return next year as a student. 



236 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Eva Rogerson, Fan Lamb Haughton, Alice Vanderford and Eloise 
Robinson, on their return from Chapel Hill, where they attended the 
Easter dances, paid us a short visit. Among the other alumnae who 
have lately visited us are Rena Clark, Mariel Gary, Reba Shields, 
Martha Bird Spruil, Jennie Jackson and Mary Gladstone. 

Mr. Henry Lay, who has been visiting his brother, Mr. Geo. W. Lay, 
has returned to his home in Telluride, Col. 

Caroline Jones and Margaret Quince, who were recently called home 
on account of illnesses in their families, have now, we are glad to say, 
been able to return. 

Amelia Clarkson has just returned from her home in Eastover, S. C, 
where she attended the wedding of her sister Emily to Mr. Alexander 
Kelsall Ball. Jennie D. Harris has also been home to act as maid of 
honor at the wedding of one of her friends. 

We are very sorry that Miss Wilson, Carol Woodson and Dorothy 
Brown were obliged to leave school before the end of the year on account 
of ill health. Bessie Erwin also spent several weeks at her home in 
Durham on account of illness, but has now returned. 

John Carroll Mann. 
Every one connected with St. Mary's felt very close to John Carroll 
Mann, and when the little life was taken, each heart went out to his 
parents in sincerest sympathy. The funeral took place at five o'clock 
on Thursday, May the fourth, Dr. Pittenger and Mr. Lay officiating. 
A hymn, "Jesus, Tender Shepherd," was sung by six St. Mary's girls, 
friends of the little boy. A second hymn, "Safe in the Arms of Jesus," 
was sung by the tiny grave. Mingled with the great sadness one could 
not but feel a certain sweetness, a certain simplicity, that seemed to 
speak of the purity of the little life now ended. 

TlNSLEY HARRISON. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, 3 ■ = = a Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, In 
the Interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1910-1911. 

Nell Battle Lewis, Editor-in-Chief. 

Bessie Smedes Erwin, Caroline Clarke Jones, Janie Ruffin Sims, 

Elizabeth Btrd Henderson, Josephine Tonnoffski, 

Elizabeth Hughes, Isabelle Hester Perrt, Rebecca Bennehan Wood. 

Ruth Reynolds Critz. 

Elizabeth Woodard Leart, Business Manager. 

Amelia Pinckney Sturgeon, Asst. Bus. Mgr. 



EDITORIAL. 



So Commencement is upon us at last ! Commencement with its dis- 
tribution of honors, its many pleasures, the bringing together again of 
many visiting friends, and with its partings ; yet such partings as are 
in themselves "sweet sorrow." There have been objections raised to 
the term "commencement" being applied to graduating exercises, but 
is it not after all a word most appropriately used ? To the Freshman 
it marks the beginning of the long-looked-for Sophomore career ; for 
the Sophomore it is the first step into the joys of becoming a Junior; 
and for the Senior it is the beginning of what poets have been wont 
to call "the voyage on the ocean of life." All commencements are fine — 
none are failures, and let us put forward all of our enthusiasm and 
make this the very best Commencement yet. To Preps, Sophs, Juniors, 
Seniors and faculty alike, may it be a commencement of the many joys 
and festivities of a happy summer vacation. 



238 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Ode to Spring. 



Men always write these odes to spring, 

You see them every day; 
But now that my turn has arrived, 

I don't know what to say. 

I have been told, on no account, 

To pick out "hackneyed words"; 
But how tell of the "joyful spring" 

And not the "chanting birds" ? 

And how tell of the bright green trees 

In all their "budding glory," 
And not pick out the phrases used 

In almost every story? 

And so you see I can not write 

This horrid "ode to spring"; 
My mind is such a blank I know 

Not one original thing. 

Evelyn Maxwell. 



READ !— MARK !— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



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CASHIER 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO. 

"round steps bank" since 1S65 

WE APPRECIATE OLD FRIENDS 

AND 

WELCOME THE NEW 
4% Time Certificates of Deposit Call at the Bank 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

Jolly &• Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 

DR. F. D. CASTLEBURY 

DENTIST 

AYCOCK & WINSTON 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW RALEIGH, N. C. 

JOHN C. DREWRY 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 

Dr. V. E. TURNER 

DENTIST 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 

Dr. D. E. EVERETT 

DENTIST 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 

HUNTER BROS., & BREWER COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

J. R. FERRALL & COMPANY— GROCERIES 

BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 

222 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

It will well pay you to buy your Ready-to-Wear 

Garments at our store because we sell 

better goods for less money 

THE FASHION 203-205 Fayetteville St. 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

109 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 

Why is Brantley's Fountain the Most Popular ? 
ASK THE GIRLS 

ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 




St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 

C. E. HARTGE— ARCHITECT 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

MRS. FRANK REDFORD— MILLINERY 

13 West Hargett St. Phone 632 

10% off to Faculty and Boarding Pupils 

SHOES 

12 East Martin Street 
PEEBLES & EDWARDS 

DR. ERNEST H. BROUGHTON 

DENTIST 

116 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

DR. E. B. HOWLE 

DENTIST 

BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

Books and Stationery 

113 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 

GREEN & WATSON 

Art Store 

11 West Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 



WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 

Phone 953-R 

217H Fayetteville Street 



N. H. MOORE 

Repairer of Fine Shoes 

Fayetteville Street 



MISS SMITH 

DRESSMAKER 

Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 
Rich Jewelry and Silverware 
Repairing promptly done 

Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located at 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th St?., Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable na 
ture. Manufacturing of new jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 




Calendar for 1911-1912. 



1911. 

September 18, Monday: Faculty assemble at St. Mary's. 

September 19, Tuesday: Registration and Classification of City Pupils; New Board- 
ing Pupils report by 7 p. m. 

September 20, Wednesday: Preliminary Examinations; Old Boarding Pupils report 
by 7 p. m. ; Registration and Classification of Boarding Pupils. 

September 21, Thursday: Opening Service of Advent Term (First Half-year) at; 
9 a. m. 

November 1, Wednesday: All Saints; Founders' Day. 

November 23, Thursday: Second Quarter begins. 

November 30: Thanksgiving Day. 

December 15-January 3 : Christmas Recess. 

1912. 

January 3, Wednesday: All pupils report by 7 p. m. 

January 25, Thursday: Easter Term (Second Half-year) begins. 

February 21, Ash Wednesday: Lent begins. 

March 21, Thursday: Last Quarter begins. 

March 31, Palm Sunday': Annual Visit of the Bishop for Confirmation. 

April 5, Good Friday: Holy Day. 

May 12, Sunday: Alumnae Day; 70th Anniversary of the Founding of St. Mary's. 

May 16, Thursday: Ascension Day. 

May 26-May 28: Commencement Season. 

September 19, Thursday: 71st Session begins. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Marts School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

70th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 21, 1911. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1912. 



St. Mary's 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 
S. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



offers instruction in these 

Departments: j. THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1910-11 were enrolled 250 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector 



o +. 



AUT. JR 



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